By Tom Blumer | October 26, 2016 | 11:00 PM EDT

Joe Biden appeared on MSNBC's Hardball on Tuesday, and claimed that "You never heard me criticize the tea party." Millions of people with decent memories and the ability to hear know that this is not true. Those with longer memories know that Biden's strident criticisms of the Tea Party movement, its members and its political candidates and officeholders go back over six years.

Center-right outlets are having a field day with Biden's bogus claim, as they should be. Meanwhile, the establishment press is predictably virtually ignoring what Biden said. One person who has mostly escaped criticism thus far is Chris Matthews, Hardball's host. Matthews didn't challenge Biden's obviously untrue statement, even though he discussed the Vice President's fiery rhetoric five years ago when he made a speech at a union picnic in Cincinnati. At the time and in the context of other events that day, Matthews and his guest clearly believed that Biden was targeting the Tea Party.

By Tom Blumer | October 23, 2016 | 10:00 PM EDT

I hope I'm right when I contend that most people in Oregon aren't as dumb as the writer of a photo caption in an article found at Oregon Live, the web site of the Oregonian, apparently is (or, one hopes, is only pretending to be). The caption's writer, commenting on a 2.5 percent gross receipts tax — not an income tax, but a tax off the top on sales — claims that "One question Oregonians have about a corporate tax measure on the November ballot is whether it would increase costs for consumers." He further notes that grocery stores "are one industry that could raise prices to cover the cost of the tax." The idea that Oregonians won't (excuse the expression) eat the cost of the tax imposed if what is known as Measure 97 passes, either through higher prices or other means, becomes more absurd the more one learns about the details of the tax.

By Walter E. Williams | October 20, 2016 | 2:51 AM EDT

If a person wants to go into business as a taxicab owner, what requirements should be imposed to protect the public? The prospective taxicab owner should show that he is honest and can operate a vehicle safely. His vehicle should pass a safety inspection, and he should have a liability insurance policy. Some cities require the purchase of an existing license, sometimes called a medallion. A medallion has cost as much as over $1 million, as in the case of New York City, and the cost has reached $700,000 in Boston and $360,000 in Chicago.

By Walter E. Williams | October 12, 2016 | 12:27 PM EDT

Detroit school students, represented by the Los Angeles-based public interest firm Public Counsel, filed suit last month against the state of Michigan, claiming a legal right to literacy based on the 14th Amendment to the Constitution. Ninety-three percent of Detroit's predominantly black public school eighth-graders are not proficient in reading, and 96 percent are not proficient in mathematics. 

By Erik Soderstrom | September 23, 2016 | 7:26 PM EDT

In its season two opener, NBC’s big box store comedy, Superstore, continued its sharp left turn left. At the end of the show’s first season, a majority of Cloud 9’s employees went on strike after the store manager was fired for “suspending” an employee, with pay, who had just given birth in the store because the corporate office had refused to offer maternity leave to its associates.

By Tom Blumer | September 8, 2016 | 5:39 PM EDT

"Firsts" — first man on the moon, first black president, first state to legalize something which was previously a crime, etc. — are supposed to be a big deal, right?

Tuesday evening, the Houston Chronicle reported a first in the entire history of organized labor in the U.S., and the national press is ignoring it. That's likely because it's really bad news for Big Labor. The jury verdict in a lawsuit filed by PJS Janitorial Services against the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) represents "the first time that a jury has found against a union in a business defamation or disparagement case."

By Curtis Houck | June 30, 2016 | 9:16 PM EDT

In Thursday’s installment of head-scratching lines uttered by MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, the Hardball host proclaimed that it’s “[c]hilling how good” Joe Biden has been as Vice President and informed guest and AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka that his very appearances on television causes him to be “in a good mood when you come on this show.”

By Michelle Malkin | May 18, 2016 | 12:48 PM EDT

All you travelers stuck in mile-long TSA security lines are pawns. Convenient political pawns. Big Labor bosses want more power and more money. Stranded travelers are just the latest victims in this age-old game of D.C. extortion.


By Tom Blumer | May 14, 2016 | 11:00 AM EDT

The establishment press has given an open mic to proponents of raising the minimum wage nationally, and has cheered $15-per-hour legislation passed in California and New York earlier this year as "historic."

The silence from those same quarters, e.g., the Associated Press, the New York Times and others, is deafening now that one of the predictions of those who have criticized such sharp increases, which take the minimum to double the current federal level of $7.25 and triple the $5.15 seen in early 2007, is beginning to come true. Critics have contended that employers would mechanize key processes to control their labor costs faster than they otherwise would have. That is exactly what The Wendy's Company, "the world's third-largest quick-service hamburger company," is about to start doing.

By Tom Blumer | April 23, 2016 | 11:56 PM EDT

In an utterly amazing and totally unexpected coincidence, Verizon is reporting that there has been a spike in vandalism and sabotage against its facilities since workers went on strike on April 13. (That's sarcasm, folks.) Paul J. Gough at the Pittsburgh Business Times has reported the company's claim that "there have been more than two dozen cases of what it called sabotage to cables and its facilities in the week since tens of thousands of its employees went on strike."

Some other local TV stations and outlets have also covered the matter, but it's not national news at the Associated Press or other national outlets, even though the wire service has done several stories on the strike, and even though its scope — 39,000 union members in nine states and DC — is hardly inconsequential.

By Tom Blumer | April 23, 2016 | 9:21 PM EDT

On Friday, the New York Daily News broke the news that "The head investigator for the state Board of Elections probed the 2014 fundraising efforts by (New York City) Mayor de Blasio and his team on behalf of the (New York State) Senate Democrats and found enough 'willful and flagrant' violations to warrant a criminal referral to the Manhattan DA’s office."

The story has attracted virtually no national establishment press attention. The New York Times, which seems to have sensed the gravity of the matter in the nick of time, ran an excuse-making pre-emptive Thursday story which appeared on the front page of Friday's print edition. After the Daily News reported the criminal referral recommendation, the Times returned to the matter on Friday evening — and placed their coverage on Page A17 of its Saturday print edition.

By Tom Blumer | April 10, 2016 | 11:55 PM EDT

On Tuesday, shortly after Governor Jerry Brown signed California's $15-an-hour minimum wage legislation, the Associated Press's Michael R. Blood and Don Thompson called the move "a victory for those struggling on the margins of the economy and the politically powerful unions that pushed it."

As seen in a NewsBusters post on March 31, it's definitely a win for union members whose wages are set at a multiple of the state's minimum wage. But it's not a "victory" for "struggling" workers who will lose their jobs or not be able to become employed at the higher rate. The AP pair would only concede that "the overall goal of helping the working poor might be lessened if some employers cut jobs or, worse, leave the state." Forget the "if" on employers cutting jobs, guys. That's because, as Jeb Graham at Investor's Business Daily reported on Friday (HT Hot Air), two states which have only raised their minimums to just over $10 have already seen seasonally adjusted job losses (bolds are mine):