Racism

By Tom Johnson | May 30, 2014 | 10:43 PM EDT

Talking Points Memo editor and publisher Josh Marshall contended Thursday that there's been a "relatively consistent pattern" of conservatives lionizing those who "hat[e] or insult...some historically or currently discriminated against group." Some of these newly minted right-wing heroes, Marshall argued, lead with their bigotry; others gain fame for "being kind of nuts" and their bigotry emerges later.
 
Marshall opined that Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson definitely would belong in such a group, but added that he's "on the fence" about whether Dr. Ben Carson would qualify.

By Connor Williams | May 30, 2014 | 12:38 PM EDT

In a sick way, you have to hand it to the Left. They seem to be infinitely creative in the ways they charge conservatives with racism.

Both Amanda Marcotte of Slate and Randall Balmer, writing for Politico, recently took to smearing social conservatives by highlighting a small kernel of truth in an idea that is largely inaccurate.

By Tom Blumer | May 28, 2014 | 1:35 AM EDT

Melissa Harris-Perry seems to have a problem with some African-Americans making a lot of money in professional sports, apparently because some other people also make money in the process. Specifically, she seems to believe that the relationship between players in the National Basketball Association and their teams' owners is a form of slavery.

It's hard to conclude otherwise based on statements made by the MSNBC host this past Saturday. Perry introduced her segment about the Mark Cuban "controversy," wherein the owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks expressed self-preservation-related desires — which he inexplicably attributed to being personally "prejudiced" and "bigoted" — to move to the other side of the street upon seeing a "black kid in a hoodie" or "a white guy with a shaved head and lot of tattoos," by saying: "You can’t really talk about (slavery) reparations and ignore the modern day wealthy Americans who own teams made up predominantly of black men and profit from their bodies and labor." In case viewers missed her take the first time, she went there again, as seen in the video which follows the jump (HT TruthRevolt via BizPac Review):

By Tom Johnson | May 26, 2014 | 9:45 PM EDT

This isn't a golden age for Republicans. The party is out of the White House -- in fact, it's lost the popular vote in five of the last six presidential elections -- and it hasn't controlled the Senate since 2006.

And now here comes Salon's Joan Walsh to argue that things will get even worse for GOPers once they lose their "galvanizing and unifying issue," namely "irrational, implacable hostility to [President] Obama...often fed by a wellspring of conscious and unconscious racism."  

By NB Staff | May 23, 2014 | 5:00 PM EDT

When you've saved countless lives with painstaking precision in long, intense hours of neurosurgery, being outnumbered three-to-one in a political discussion on cable TV is a piece of cake. Dr. Ben Carson appeared live in studio on the May 22 edition of MSNBC's All In with Chris Hayes with the program's host and liberal think-tank president Heather McGhee. Newly-minted MSNBC host José Díaz-Balart rounded out the panel, appearing via satellite. 

Carson was on the program in part to plug his new book, One Nation, and was asked by Hayes to defend his thoughts on how liberals exploit racial categorizations to divide Americans. Carson noted that his experience as a neurosurgeon has enforced his colorblind view of the world [watch the segment by clicking play on the embed below the page break]:

By Tom Blumer | May 21, 2014 | 9:03 PM EDT

At a website called Girard at Large in Manchester, New Hampshire, proprietor Richard Girard videotaped and reported on the proceedings of a debate held at St. Anselm's College on the Common Core educational standards — something you'll almost never see anyone in the establishment press deign to do.

Girard appropriately described proponents' descriptions of and arguments in favor of the standards "revealing," "enlightening," and "well, frightening." Perhaps no statement made during the two-hour event Monday contained more of all three adjectives than one made by Dr. David Pook, a teacher at The Derryfield School in Manchester, about what motivated him to get involved with having input into the English Language Arts standards. Brace yourself (HT BizPac Review; specific audio segment is at this link; bolds are mine throughout this post; May 22 Update: Mr. Pook's comment was slightly revised at the original link for accuracy; that revision is now reflected below):

By Lillian Bozzone | May 21, 2014 | 12:19 PM EDT

A darling of the lefty entertainment establishment has taken a prosthetic nose dive into hot water. At Macklemore’s May 16 Seattle performance at the opening of “Spectacle: The Music Video,” the rapper lionized for his pro-gay stance appeared on stage in a stereotypical Jewish costume, singing his hit, “Thrift Shop.”

Bad move for a guy celebrated for injecting “tolerance and acceptance and equal rights” into hip hop.

By Tom Blumer | May 20, 2014 | 3:09 PM EDT

If there was ever drop-dead obvious proof that it's more than fair to call the Associated Press the Administration's Press, it's in the opening phrase of the first sentence of the wire service's Monday morning report on the House's select committee on Benghazi: "Republicans hoping to ride their Benghazi investigation to a November election sweep ..." As far as reporters Donna Cassata and Bradley Klapper are concerned, there can't possibly be any other motivation for holding the hearings.

Cassata and Klapper's agenda-driven drivel makes several trips into the land of "Republicans say," when the correct words should be: "The facts are." More crucially, Klapper completely ignored two reports he filed on October 10, 2012 which showed that the State Department "never believed" that the murder of Christopher Stevens and three other Americans in the Benghazi attack was inspired by an anti-Muslim video (bolds numbered tags are mine throughout this post):

By Tom Johnson | May 15, 2014 | 10:59 PM EDT
By Tim Graham | May 15, 2014 | 9:34 PM EDT

You can guess you’re on the NPR website – and the “Code Switch” race-matters blog – when an article on ice-cream trucks comes with an editor’s warning: “This article is about a virulently racist song. Read no further if you wish to avoid racist imagery and slurs.”

Some trucks apparently play the well-known melody “Turkey In the Straw,” and Theodore R. Johnson III blamed "a great many" ice cream trucks for playing a melody apparently popularized by a blackface song named “Zip Coon” and a horrid 1916 ditty titled “"Ni--er Love A Watermelon Ha! Ha! Ha!"

By Matthew Balan | May 14, 2014 | 4:04 PM EDT

Tauriq Moosa slammed Nintendo in a Monday item for The Daily Beast for supposedly perpetuating "anti-gay bigotry." The writer singled out the Japanese video game company for rejecting same-sex relationships as an option in its "life simulator" game Tomodachi Life, and lamented that its decision "has a huge effect on creative media, on culture, and thus people themselves."

Moosa used the Nintendo controversy as a jumping off to hammer the video game industry in general for its apparent negative attitudes towards homosexuals and women:

By Jack Coleman | May 13, 2014 | 7:07 PM EDT

Ed Schultz briefly revealed what he actually thinks on his radio show yesterday, then quickly retreated to the comforting confines of the nonsensical.

Schultz was talking about embattled Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling and his interview with Anderson Cooper of CBS about racist remarks made by Sterling and recorded by a gold-digger girlfriend working for him as an "archivist." (Audio after the jump)