Racism

By Mark Finkelstein | June 30, 2014 | 8:24 AM EDT

Hobby Lobby's objection on religious grounds to paying for abortion-causing contraceptives for its employees reminds Eugene Robinson of segregationists who cited the Bible in support of their views.  In his great magnimity, Robinson allowed that the Hobby Lobby case "is perhaps a bit different." But if the WaPo columnist didn't think the segregation analogy were relevant, he presumably wouldn't have cited it in the first place on today's Morning Joe.

There was also a point of light on the show.  Donny Deutsch, after announcing that he was "far from a conservative," nevertheless went on to make the explicitly free-market argument that "nobody is forcing anybody to work at Hobby Lobby."  View the video after the jump.

By Kyle Drennen | June 25, 2014 | 4:20 PM EDT

Shortly after news broke on Wednesday that Diane Sawyer would step down as anchor of ABC's World News and be replaced by David Muir, Temple University journalism professor Karen Turner ranted to MediaBistro's TVNewser blog: "In this growing multicultural nation, it's unconscionable that as of September three white men will lead their respective networks."

By Tim Graham | June 19, 2014 | 11:17 PM EDT

The Washington Post might lament the rise of extremism in politics, of bitterness and incivility, that our politics are “broken.” If they really meant that, then why promote Ta-Nehisi Coates?

There he is, on the front of Thursday’s Style section, being honored for a huge article in The Atlantic magazine demanding black Americans get reparations from white Americans for ancient sins that happened long before today’s Americans of all colors were born. He’s bitter, he’s extreme, and he has a racial animus. And the Post loves him for it.

By Kyle Drennen | June 19, 2014 | 5:20 PM EDT

At the top of Wednesday's NBC Nightly News, anchor Brian Williams seized on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office revoking the trademark of the Washington Redskins as part of the liberal crusade to force the team to change it's name: "Taking a hit. The feds go after the Redskins where it hurts the most, money from team merchandise, as the controversy over the team's name takes a surprise turn." [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

Introducing the later report, Williams proclaimed: "The pressure just increased on the Washington Redskins to change their team name. Starting with the fact that they may no longer have the exclusive use of their own name in the lucrative business of NFL merchandise." Correspondent Kristen Welker touted the government abuse of power as "A victory for Native Americans who say the name should go, calling it just as racist as the 'N' word."

By Jeffrey Meyer | June 18, 2014 | 11:06 AM EDT

Hillary Clinton sat down with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour for a town hall interview on Tuesday, June 17  to promote her new book “Hard Choices” and was greeted with questions that tilted five to one in favor of liberal issues.

The interview focused on a variety of domestic and foreign topics but it was Amanpour’s question to Clinton about racism towards President Obama that caught a lot of attention. The CNN reporter wondered “Senator Jay Rockefeller said recently and he suggested basically that some of the political opposition to President Obama could have something to do with the color of his skin. Do you agree with that? What do you think about that?” [See video below.]  

By Jackie Seal | June 17, 2014 | 11:19 AM EDT

In a desperate effort to tout the collapse of the Republican Party, guest host of The Last Word, Ari Melber was joined by Howard Dean and David Frum on Monday evening to discuss the lack of serious ideas coming from the right. According to the MSNBC liberals, the fearful Tea Party wants to go back to a pre-Civil War America.

The guests swapped theories on the relationship between the GOP and the Tea Party. Howard Dean used the textbook MSNBC talking point that the Tea Party is just frustrated that the people leading the country “don’t look like them anymore.”

By Randy Hall | June 14, 2014 | 5:35 PM EDT

While acknowledging that racism “isn't limited to Texas,” a Democratic activist from the Lone Star State told guest host Michael Eric Dyson during Thursday's edition of The Ed Show on MSNBC: “We're just more out and proud with it” and “don’t segregate and live apart from each other, like they do in the Northeast.”

Sarah Slamen -- a party official from Fort Bend County -- made the remark while discussing the comments of two-term La Marque City Council member Connie Trube, who is under fire after an audio of her calling for removal of “those blacks off the school board” was leaked to the public.

By Jeffrey Meyer | June 12, 2014 | 3:45 PM EDT

June 13 marks twenty years since O.J., Simpson’s ex wife and boyfriend were found murdered outside their condo in California, and MSNBC’s Joy-Ann Reid chose to use her June 12 The Reid Report  program to discuss the O.J. Simpson and how in Joy-Ann Reid’s words “race played into that trial.” 

Lisa Bloom, legal analyst for NBC News and daughter of feminist lawyer Gloria Allred, appeared with Reid and proclaimed “I have a race discrimination case going on right now. I’m sure hoping I get African-Americans on the jury. Because I don't think whites really understand the black experience here in Los Angeles.” [See video below.]

By Jackie Seal | June 10, 2014 | 4:50 PM EDT

Leave it to MSNBC to exploit a shooting by a pair of deranged extremists to push the notion that violence is on the rise as a racist reacting to having a black man in the Oval Office.

That's what MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell did in a segment of the Tuesday edition of her MSNBC program, asking political consultant and former Attorney General Eric Holder spokesman Matthew Miller if the shooting was in part fueled by the fact that “we have an African-American president.”

By Tom Blumer | June 10, 2014 | 12:53 AM EDT

In a video segment (HT Twitchy) entitled "How Low Can You Go?" on MSNBC's "Last Word," which the network's web site corrected as this post was being drafted, substitute host Ari Melber, filling in for Lawrence O'Donnell, is seen bemoaning the resignation of a Democratic legislator in Virginia. An accompanying visual originally showed a map of North Carolina. Apparent the answer to the map's captioned question — "How Low Can You Go?" — is, "further south than Virginia actually is."

The far-left network and Democrats in general are apopleptic over the sudden resignation of Demcorat Phillip P. Puckett from the State Senate, giving the GOP a 20-19 majority in that body. As a result, the Washington Post reported on Monday that Puckett's resignation caused "Democratic negotiators ... (to agree) in a closed-door meeting Monday to pass a budget without expanding health coverage to 400,000 low-income Virginians." 

By Tom Blumer | June 2, 2014 | 6:44 PM EDT

This past weekend at the Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans, attendees who voted in a straw poll gave almost 60 percent of their straws to Hispanic-American Ted Cruz (30.3 percent), who edged out African-American Ben Carson (29.4 percent), leaving all others, only one of whom broke 10 percent, in the dust.

In what should be considered embarrassing timing, LA Weekly Magazine is running a June 1 cover cartoon showing establishment and anti-establishment Republicans playing tug-of-war with an elephant in the middle. Among those pulling on the anti-establishment side is a hooded Klansman who serves as the primary puller (reproduced after the jump for fair use and discussion purposes; HT Joel B. Pollak at Breitbart via Godfather Politics):

By Tom Blumer | May 31, 2014 | 4:28 PM EDT

I guess the PC sports press was hoping for a high-tech lyching of sorts, wherein Donald Sterling, the owner in limbo who is soon to be former owner of the National Basketall Association's Los Angeles Clippers, would be frog-marched out of his office and dumped onto Skid Row, never to be heard from again, for his undeniably racist remarks to his now ex-girlfriend about how he didn't want her bringing blacks to Clippers games while directing racial invective at other specific persons.

It's not working out that way. In fact, quite the opposite. Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is reportedly paying $2 billion for the Clippers. That's quite a windfall for Sterling, considering that he apparently paid about $12.5 million for the team in the early 1980s and that the team was valued at about $575 million in the most recent related edition of Forbes. At Huffington Post and ESPN, Earl Ofari Hutchinson and Scoop Jackson, respectively, are almost beside themselves.