Racism

By Randy Hall | April 29, 2015 | 6:28 PM EDT

During Tuesday's edition of The Nightly Show on the Comedy Central cable channel, host Larry Wilmore used a combination of bad comedy and vulgarity to criticize how the Cable News Network and the Fox News Channel covered the riots and chaos in Baltimore the night before.

With the phrase “What a Riot” over a picture of a burning car, the black liberal began the segment by stating: “We're talking about the devastating events in Baltimore” before playing a clip of a CNN reporter noting that Maryland governor Larry Hogan had declared a state of emergency, and school was canceled after the riots on Monday night.

By Tom Johnson | April 29, 2015 | 10:51 AM EDT

Late in the Reconstruction period and for many years thereafter, white-supremacist paramilitary groups often committed acts of terrorism in the southern United States. That much is clear. Also clear, at least to Daily Kos's Denise Oliver-Velez, is that the spirit of those groups lives today in American police departments and in the viewership of Fox News.

“They don't kill us in bunches anymore. Now they just murder us one by one,” argued Oliver-Velez in a Sunday post. “One by one, as we are murdered by red shirts in blue, the message is re-enforced by bullets in the back, and chokeholds around our necks, no different than the nooses hung from trees. The audience is now on Fox News, rather than standing around the bonfires of death.”

By Tom Blumer | April 28, 2015 | 11:19 PM EDT

At NewsBusters this morning, Matthew Philbin posted on how Michael Eric Dyson, in a guest appearance on MSNBC (where else?), placed a great deal of blame for Baltimore's blight on "the ways in which the Baltimore Ravens and Baltimore Orioles with their tax-exempt status were given tremendous goodies to stay into the city."

It would be reasonable to believe that Dyson, who has revealed a vengeful streak in the recent past, is quite pleased at the financial losses the Orioles, their employees, and businesses in the vicinity are being forced to absorb. Thanks to arguably necessary decisions made today, they will continue.

By Tom Blumer | April 28, 2015 | 7:12 PM EDT

The language police came out in full force today, expressing outrage that President Barack Obama employed an accurate word — "thugs" — to describe many of those involved in Baltimore's three days of rioting.

The PR flaks at a leftist media group went to a spokesperson for a Latino "organizing" group. He attacked Obama, not for using the word, but for having the temerity to apply it a "handful" (Obama's word) of rioters instead of to the police — "President Obama Should Call Freddie Gray’s Murderers Thugs, Not Protesters." The Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, has dutifully fallen into line, not only protecting Obama by ignoring his use of the word, but also by giving prominence to Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's pathetic apology for having previously used it.

By Mark Finkelstein | April 28, 2015 | 1:20 PM EDT

Let's begin by answering Andrea Mitchell's question. "How would it have appeared" if Baltimore mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake had called the Maryland governor to request National Guard troops just afer Freddie Gray's funeral? It would have appeared that she was doing her job, protecting people and property, rather than being overly concerned with photo-op politics.

On her MSNBC show today, Mitchell asked Rep. Elijah Cummings to explain why the mayor waited three hours after the rioting started to call the Governor for help.  Good question.  But when Cummings criticized "Tuesday morning quarterbacking" and mentioned that the Gray funeral had just ended, Mitchell backed off.  She thanked Cummings for his "context." Andrea then apologetically added "you're right: how would it have appeared if she called up the National Guard as the funeral was taking place?"

By Tom Johnson | April 28, 2015 | 1:08 PM EDT

In a Monday-night blog post, the writer for The Atlantic argued that calls for non-violence in response to the rioting in Baltimore are essentially “a ruse” and “a con,” given the city’s recent history of police brutality.

“When nonviolence begins halfway through the war with the aggressor calling time out,” wrote Coates, “it exposes itself as a ruse. When nonviolence is preached by the representatives of the state, while the state doles out heaps of violence to its citizens, it reveals itself to be a con. And none of this can mean that rioting or violence is ‘correct’ or ‘wise,’ any more than a forest fire can be ‘correct’ or ‘wise.’ Wisdom isn't the point tonight. Disrespect is. In this case, disrespect for the hollow law and failed order that so regularly disrespects the community.”

By Matthew Philbin | April 28, 2015 | 10:16 AM EDT

Professional race explainer Michael Eric Dyson said a lot of stupid things on MSNBC’s All In with Chris Hayes Monday. (Yes, it’s still on the air.) And really, that’s understandable, given that his job was to find excuses for the inexcusable violence and looting in Baltimore.

But mixed in with his litany of exculpatory urban dysfunction (“… the slow terror of expulsions from schools, rising rates of lead poisoning, the export of jobs to, uh, places across the waters …”) and awful metaphors (“it’s easy to point a gun of analysis and shoot [the rioters] with the bullets of our condemnation”) he managed to lash out at … professional sports.

By Mark Finkelstein | April 28, 2015 | 8:54 AM EDT

At yesterday's funeral service for Freddie Gray, Pastor Jamal Bryant ended his eulogy by leading the congregation in a highly-charged chant of "No justice! No peace!"  Yet immediately after playing the clip of that moment, Joe Scarborough claimed that the riots that ensued were "something that no one inside that funeral could have ever have wanted."

Had Scarborough listened to his own clip? If not, why not? If so, what does he think "no justice, no peace" means?

By Curtis Houck | April 28, 2015 | 12:59 AM EDT

During CNN’s live coverage on Monday night of the Baltimore riots, CNN commentator Marc Lamont Hill urged viewers to view what was taking place as “not a riot” but “uprisings” in response to African-Americans “dying in the streets for months, years, decades, centuries” due to “police terrorism.” When brought into the discussion by CNN Tonight host Don Lemon, Hill declared that “there shouldn’t be calm tonight” in Baltimore since there’s been “black people...dying in the streets for months, years, decades, centuries.”

By Curtis Houck | April 27, 2015 | 8:29 PM EDT

Early Monday evening during the violent riots in Baltimore, liberal CNN commentator Sally Kohn tweeted her thoughts on the events by lamenting that “looting” was “a real shame,” but “police violence against [the] black community” was [emphasis hers] “FAR MORE shameful.”

By Tom Blumer | April 27, 2015 | 8:17 PM EDT

The headline is already gone from the Associated Press's national site, but it's still present elsewhere.

In the context of events in Ferguson and elsewhere since August of last year, one could argue that it contains more truth than the wire service and the headline's accidental creators will ever admit.

By Tom Blumer | April 27, 2015 | 2:27 PM EDT

At Instapundit, Elizabeth Price Foley caught a real doozy of a column in the Cincinnati area's only daily newspaper — if you insist on calling something which looks like it was cobbled together overnight at Fedex-Kinko's a "newspaper."

If there was a daily prize for the largest quantity of subtle but arrogant condescension in an opinion column, Cincinnati native, Ohio State graduate, and current North Charleston, South Carolina middle school teacher Meg Stentz would be yesterday's hands-down winner. Proving that she's keeping up with the latest trends in political correctness, she even dragged one of the left's favorite new words into her Sunday writeup.