Racism

By Mark Finkelstein | December 4, 2014 | 7:07 AM EST

Amidst all the Morning Joe talk about the Eric Garner case today, there was Al Sharpton looking out for #1. When Mika Brzezinski began to praise NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio for the absence of violence last night, Sharpton jumped in to shut her down and claim credit for himself. There's "the mayor and others," sniffed Sharpton, silencing her, but the real kudos for the lack of violence go to "movements" and "organized bodies."  Which movements and organized bodies, might you ask? Well, Sharpton—sporting a big button from his National Action Network—went on to praise the way a non-violent march on Staten Island had been organized by . . . Al Sharpton.

By Kristine Marsh | December 3, 2014 | 12:32 PM EST

On December 2, Jon Stewart brought on "The Daily Show" “Senior Black Correspondent" Larry Wilmore to bash conservatives for calling out the more deadly epidemic of black on black crime in light of the Ferguson protests. Wilmore is about to take over the "Colbert Report" spot at 11:30 pm after Jon Stewart with "The Nightly Show."

By Matthew Philbin | December 3, 2014 | 10:03 AM EST

They're fixated on Ferguson, but massive violence in the Windy City doesn’t fit Nets' liberal narrative.

By Geoff Harbaugh | December 3, 2014 | 8:00 AM EST

“It’s disingenuous for too many people with hidden agendas, especially lawyers, and people who love racial BS to go on, to act like white cops are out there killing black folks.”

By Tom Johnson | December 2, 2014 | 9:44 PM EST

John Judis of the New Republic and Jeffrey Toobin of the New Yorker believe that young black men often get a raw deal from police, but aren’t convinced that Wilson’s fatal shooting of Michael Brown fits into that paradigm.

By Randy Hall | December 2, 2014 | 7:48 PM EST

Now that the tumult over the decision by the grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri, not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the death of black 18-year-old Michael Brown has begun to subside, the Washington Post and ABC News commissioned a poll to determine what people across the country think about the choice, and the survey resulted in some surprising numbers.

By a margin of 48 to 45 percent, this telephone poll conducted November 25-26 and 28-30 among a random national sample of 1,011 adults -- including users of both conventional and cellular phones – determined that more people approve of the grand jury's action than Barack Obama's handling of the situation.

By Matthew Balan | December 2, 2014 | 5:39 PM EST

On Monday's CNN Tonight, Don Lemon refreshingly pointed out a problematic component of the Ferguson protests. Former police officer David Klinger pointed out that "all the forensic evidence indicates that it wasn't [Michael] Brown with his hands up standing still. All the evidence indicates that he was coming back at Officer Wilson." Lemon replied to his guest by wondering, "So the question is, this 'hands up' rallying cry has – is it a false narrative that people are using to fit their own agenda?"

By Tom Blumer | December 2, 2014 | 1:41 PM EST

Certain members of Congress abused their positions Monday to imply that "Hands up, don't shoot" was something Michael Brown actually said before he was killed by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri in August.

On Friday, the Associated Press irresponsibly gave voice to those who say that the slogan is now a "metaphor" for police brutality targeted against blacks, even though the claim that Michael Brown did or said any such thing has been completely discredited by the physical evidence and the grand jury's credible witnesses. In covering the congressional histrionics, Lucy McCalmont at the Politico, aka Pathetico (HT Seton Motley) took things to the next level.

By Mark Finkelstein | December 2, 2014 | 7:56 AM EST

Day Deux of Joe Scarborough's campaign against public figures making the "hands up, don't shoot" gesture to falsely suggest that Michael Brown was doing the same during his confrontation with Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.

As reported here, yesterday the Morning Joe host took to task the St. Louis Rams players who made the gesture, and the liberal media that has abetted their implicit allegation.  Today, while continuing his righteous rant against the Rams, Scarborough also castigated the three congressmen who took to the floor of the House yesterday to make the gesture.  No fewer than five times, Scarborough called the notion that Brown had his hands up a "lie."

By Curtis Houck | December 2, 2014 | 12:33 AM EST

During a speech in Baltimore on Saturday, Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan justified the violence that took place in Ferguson, Missouri in the aftermath of the grand jury decision and called on African-Americans to “die for something” and “tear this goddamn country up” as peaceful protests only benefit “white folks.” Since Farrakhan’s remarks at Morgan State University became public, the major broadcast networks have all ignored the story completely in both their respective morning and evening newscasts. 

By Tom Johnson | December 1, 2014 | 2:47 PM EST

In an interview with New York magazine, the comedian-actor commented,It’s not that Obama’s disappointing. It’s just his best album might have been his first album.” Rock also dealt with topics including huge improvements in American racial relations and his belief that “Ellen DeGeneres [is] the gay Rosa Parks.”

By Mark Finkelstein | December 1, 2014 | 8:53 AM EST

As Seton Motley, the former MRCer now head of Less Government said in bringing Joe Scarborough's comments to our attention: "credit when it's due."  Because the Morning Joe host had the guts today to speak truth to MSM power, including people at his own network, over the liberal media's cowardly, misleading coverage of Ferguson.

Scarborough tied the media's misinformation to the decision of five members of the St. Louis Rams to take the field last night in a "hands-up, don't shoot" gesture. Said Scarborough: "they might as well have come out with a flying saucer attached to all of their heads," because that happened as much as did Michael Brown make the gesture they thought they were imitating.