By Tom Blumer | February 10, 2016 | 12:17 PM EST

On Judge Jeanine Pirro's Saturday Fox News program, Judge Andrew Napolitano succinctly summarized the implications of the latest revelations concerning Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was the Obama administration's Secretary of State.

One can't help but notice that almost no one else is making Napolitano's obviously valid points. If a Republican or conservative had done similar things on Mrs. Clinton's scale, establishment press reporters and pundits would be making them on a daily basis:

By Matthew Balan | February 3, 2016 | 1:24 PM EST

On Tuesday's America With Jorge Ramos, Fusion's Nando Vila advanced the left-wing cause of reparations to the descendants of slaves. Vila asserted "the moral case for reparations is a clear one. Black people are 16 times poorer than white people, because white people have systematically stolen wealth from black people for hundreds of years — through slavery, Jim Crow, housing discrimination, and various other crimes." He later suggested that one way to pay reparations would be to "pull it from elsewhere in the budget...like our excessive defense spending."

By Tom Blumer | January 31, 2016 | 9:04 PM EST

In trying to explain the current situation in Venezuela, the Washington Post's Matt O'Brien, in a post at the paper's Wonkblog, also inadvertently identified two reasons why authoritarian socialist tyrants like Huge Chavez and Nicolas Maduro are able to achieve and retain power.

The formula is simple: When you first gain power, garner international and media goodwill by giving stuff away, like housing and gasoline. That wlll earn you props from the likes of O'Brien and liberals everywhere who have come to believe that doing so "is a good idea in general." Meanwhile, you can work in the background to overturn whatever checks and balances your country's political system might have. If the populace finally figures out what you're really up to and rises up in opposition, they can't stop you — even if your party gets blown out in elections and takes over what has become, thanks to you, an impotent legislature.

By Tom Blumer | January 29, 2016 | 11:59 PM EST

This afternoon, Catherine Herridge at Fox News reported that "the intelligence community has deemed some of Hillary Clinton’s emails 'too damaging' to national security to release under any circumstances."

This eighth "smoking gun" — on top of the seven an Investor's Business Daily editorial identified last week — wasn't enough to move the Associated Press Bradley Klapper from the AP's default position virtually since Mrs. Clinton's private email server was discovered, naturally referencing unidentified "independent experts," namely that "it's unlikely Clinton will be charged with wrongdoing."

By Tom Blumer | January 22, 2016 | 11:01 PM EST

These people play the press and the courts like a fiddle.

At 2 p.m. Friday — just in time for a slow-news weekend and the onset of what is supposed to be a serious blizzard in the Northeast — the State Department asked a federal court for an extension of time to February 29 to complete its interagency review and release of Hillary Clinton's private-server emails. But State didn't merely use the snowstorm to minimize news visibility. In the court filing, it also cited the weekend snowstorm as a reason why it can't its work done:

By Brad Wilmouth | January 21, 2016 | 8:54 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's Anderson Cooper 360 and again on Thursday morning's At This Hour with Berman and Bolduan, liberal CNN political commentator Donna Brazile ranted against Sarah Palin's recent criticism of President Barack Obama as commander-in-chief, and called her a "liar" after the CNN commentator interpreted Palin's comments as blaming the President for her veteran son's problems with PTSD.

By Matthew Balan | January 21, 2016 | 3:24 PM EST

On Wednesday's AC360, CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin downplayed the latest development in Hillary Clinton's e-mail scandal — the revelation that her private e-mail server "contained highly-classified intelligence from the most top secret of programs," as host Anderson Cooper reported. Toobin asserted that "it's a huge political problem," but added, "I don't think it's a big legal problem. I don't think the FBI is going to wind up charging her with a crime."

By Tom Johnson | January 19, 2016 | 11:49 AM EST

The Dallas-Fort Worth area is, of course, part of the Bible Belt. Nonetheless, according to Christopher Hooks, another faith flourishes there: “It’s also a place that’s responsible in large part for the rise of the new civic religion built around the worship of the most lethal among us.”

Hooks, an Austin-based journalist, was one of about 30,000 persons who attended last week’s world premiere of 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi at AT&T Stadium, best known as the home of the Dallas Cowboys. He detailed what he saw in a Friday article for Gawker, the gossipy New York website that of late has become much more politics-oriented. Though Hooks found 13 Hours technically accomplished, he asserted that its “moral landscape…is poisonous.”

By Mark Finkelstein | January 19, 2016 | 9:56 AM EST

Wow! That was Mika Brzezinski's repeated reaction to Robert Gates' amazingly frank take on the presidential field. Appearing on today's Morning Joe, the former Defense Secretary shot down all contenders mentioned, dumped on two who have not yet entered the race, and retroactively knocked President Obama for always thinking he was the smartest guy in the room. 

Here was Gates' rap on various candidates: Ted Cruz: people proposing carpet bombing "don't know what they're talking about." Joe Biden: "I don't think so." Donald Trump: "if you have never beeen in government, your ability to make the government work is going to be significantly reduced." John Kerry: "I don't think so." Anyone in the field possessing the qualities he'd like to see in a president? "I don't see any."

By Curtis Houck | January 18, 2016 | 7:37 AM EST

In contrast to the other post-Democratic debate analyses on Sunday night, the guests assembled on the Fox News Channel (FNC) repeatedly ripped the three presidential candidates for failing to mention national security or foreign policy in the debates’s first question from NBC co-moderator Lester Holt on what three things they would do in their first 100 days in office.

By Tom Johnson | January 16, 2016 | 12:07 PM EST

During the 1980s, a favorite talking point of liberals was that President Reagan tended to confuse movies with reality. In a Friday article, Zack Beauchamp accused a current Republican presidential candidate, Ted Cruz, of doing something similar, and alleged that the GOPers who took part in Thursday’s prime-time debate stand for a “view of the world [that] is as much a work of fiction as” Michael Bay's new film, 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi.

Towards the end of the debate, Cruz touted 13 Hours. Beauchamp commented, “The movie portrays politicians as ‘abandoning’ the Americans in Benghazi. But in reality, that is a conspiracy theory that has been roundly debunked…This moment, Cruz citing a fictitious movie as truth, was of a piece with the debate as a whole. In it, much of conversation about world affairs existed in a make-believe world, and a terrifying one at that, in which the very existence of America is in perilous danger. In other words, it wasn't just Ted Cruz who was living in a fiction last night — it was the entire stage.”

By Dylan Gwinn | January 15, 2016 | 3:49 PM EST
ISIS has made a habit of targeting Americans. Though this time it appears the “JV squad” has picked a fight with the Varsity.