By Tom Blumer | February 11, 2016 | 5:28 PM EST

The Federal Reserve, Fed Chair Janet Yellen, and the ever-cooperative Associated Press have a message for America: "If there's an economic downturn, even one that turns into a recession, it's going to be the rest of the world's fault. The U.S. economy is fine, and it will stay fine if everybody else doesn't ruin it."

As the AP's Martin Crutsinger reported today ("YELLEN: TOO EARLY TO DETERMINE IMPACT OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENTS"), Yellen told members of the Senate Banking Committee that, in Crutsinger's words, "that global economic pressures pose risks to the U.S. economy," and that the Fed will wait until its next meeting to see "how much economic weakness and falling markets around the world have hamstrung U.S. growth." Folks, to "hamstring" growth, you've got to have growth, and the best estimates at the moment are telling us that at the end of last year there either wasn't any, or that it barely existed.

By Tom Blumer | February 11, 2016 | 2:27 PM EST

As Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential effort has weakened, many on the left in fairly prominent places have begun releasing years of pent-up frustrations about her, her husband, and their record. At long last, the long knives are beginning to come out.

Many of these missives are unhinged, but one which isn't, and deserves a closer look, comes from Camille Paglia at Salon.com. Given that Paglia's views don't neatly check off all of the far-left boxes, the fact that Salon has Paglia back for biweekly commentary on "the presidential race, the culture world, and everything in between" after a four-year hiatus is quite telling. Meanwhile, readers can count on the establishment press hanging on to Hillary as long as they can, while ignoring the mostly excellent points Paglia strenuously made early this morning.

By Tom Blumer | February 10, 2016 | 11:56 PM EST

If you're a couple of reporters at the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, it's one thing to be personally disappointed and even upset at yesterday's move by the Supreme Court to grant a stay to states challenging the "Clean Power Plan" regulation issued by the Obama administration's Environmental Protection Agency last October.

It's quite another thing to falsely portray what occurred and the related impacts, which is what AP reporters Michael Biesecker and Sam Hananel most certainly did early Wednesday morning. The nature of their dispatch, which emphasized the administration's defiant reaction, likely contributed to TV networks' decisions to ignore or downplay what the Court did, choices which Julia Seymour at NewsBusters noted earlier today.

By Tom Blumer | February 10, 2016 | 12:17 PM EST

On Judge Jeanine Pirro's Saturday Fox News program, Judge Andrew Napolitano succinctly summarized the implications of the latest revelations concerning Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was the Obama administration's Secretary of State.

One can't help but notice that almost no one else is making Napolitano's obviously valid points. If a Republican or conservative had done similar things on Mrs. Clinton's scale, establishment press reporters and pundits would be making them on a daily basis:

By Sam Dorman | February 10, 2016 | 11:35 AM EST

Academic bias in favor of government is a real problem according to the professor who sounded the alarm on Flint, Michigan’s lead contamination crisis.

That Virginia Tech civil engineering professor, Marc Edwards, criticized academia for its reluctance to criticize government and decried what he called “perverse incentives” preventing academics from criticizing government agencies that fund their research.

By Tom Blumer | February 9, 2016 | 8:56 AM EST

On Friday, in its January Employment Situation Summary, the government's Bureau of Labor Statistics served up a stack of lemons disguised as lemonade. President Barack Obama declared in a tweet that "We've recovered from the worst economic crisis since the 1930s," and the press dutifully fell in line.

The BLS reported that the economy added seasonally adjusted 151,000 payroll jobs and that the unemployment rate fell to 4.9 percent. As has been their habit for years, business reporters failed to label either key data point as "seasonally adjusted," even though they routinely apply that label to most other government data in their dispatches on the economy. The business press almost never looks at the raw (i.e., not seasonally adjusted) figures in any area. If they had looked at last Friday's raw jobs data, they would have wondered how the BLS could possibly have reported such a large number of additional seasonally adjusted jobs.

By Tom Blumer | February 6, 2016 | 7:25 PM EST

During the 2008 presidential campaign, Republican Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin referred to Madeleine Albright's somewhat well-known saying, found on a Starbucks coffee cup, that "There's a special place in Hell for women who don't help other women." At the time, Albright, who served as Secretary of State under Bill Clinton, huffed: "Though I am flattered that Governor Palin has chosen to cite me as a source of wisdom, what I said had nothing to do with politics." She naturally followed that statement with an intense political attack on Palin and GOP presidential nominee John McCain.

Now that Democrat Hillary Clinton is running for president and is in danger of losing the New Hampshire primary by a substantial margin, Albright has decided that her statement has everything to do with politics, and that women who don't support Mrs. Clinton's candidacy and vote for her deserve that "special place in Hell."

By Tom Blumer | February 4, 2016 | 9:49 AM EST

On Wednesday, Christopher Rugaber at the Associated Press was tasked with covering ADP's morning report on January private-sector payrolls. At 8:15 a.m., the payroll and benefits giant estimated that the economy added 205,000 seasonally adjusted private-sector jobs last month.

Rugaber also attended the 8:30 a.m. conference call which followed the report's release. It's clear that he was on it because his coverage, time-stamped at 9:18 a.m., contains quotes from economist Mark Zandi dealing with a key topic the sunnyside-up Moody's economist addresssed in that call. So why did the AP economics writer fail to report Zandi's acknowledgment that fourth-quarter economic growth, which the government estimated was an annualized 0.7 percent on Friday, could close in on zero in its February or March revision?

By Tom Blumer | January 31, 2016 | 11:45 AM EST

Those in the press who have insisted that the "Ferguson effect" is an urban legend will have a hard time explaining why the two cities with the most potential to be affected by this supposedly mythical phenomenon now have murder rates among the top 20 in the entire world.

St. Louis, Missouri, next door to Ferguson, where a leftist-"inspired" campaign of "protests," civil disorder and rioting began in August 2014, came in at Number 15, with a rate of 59 murders per 100,000 residents. The city's 188 murders in 2015 were up from 159 in 2014 and 120 in 2013. Baltimore, Maryland, where Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake infamously admitted in April 2015, as public safety was deteriorating in her city, that "we also gave those who wished to destroy space to do that," was Number 19, with 344 murders (a rate of 55 per 100,000).

By Tom Blumer | January 30, 2016 | 11:56 PM EST

Observers can be excused for thinking that the politicial establishment is preparing the battlespace to convince us plebes that progress and economic growth are overrated. (That's sort of odd for people who call themselves "progressives," but making sense is not their strong suit.)

How interesting, for example, that Northwestern University economist Robert Gordon's book, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, was released on January 12, even though, as Bloomberg writer Noah Smith notes, Gordon "has been going around for several years making ... (the) case (that) ... the golden days of growth are over." Just in time for the arrival of a more visibly weak economy, Gordon's premise has been getting wildly disproportionate press attention. Smith goes further in his "Economic Growth Isn't Everything" column, referring to "the illusion of stagnation" (i.e., don't believe those weak stats, even if they go negative; everything is really fine), while reminding us of the supposedly marvelous things government has done and supposedly can still do for us.

By Tom Blumer | January 30, 2016 | 10:25 AM EST

Friday morning, the government reported that the economy grew at a pathetic annual rate of 0.7 percent in last year's final quarter.

As it did in covering the disappointing Christmas shopping season, the business press partially blamed yesterday's awful result on the weather, i.e., warm weather.

By Tom Blumer | January 29, 2016 | 11:59 PM EST

This afternoon, Catherine Herridge at Fox News reported that "the intelligence community has deemed some of Hillary Clinton’s emails 'too damaging' to national security to release under any circumstances."

This eighth "smoking gun" — on top of the seven an Investor's Business Daily editorial identified last week — wasn't enough to move the Associated Press Bradley Klapper from the AP's default position virtually since Mrs. Clinton's private email server was discovered, naturally referencing unidentified "independent experts," namely that "it's unlikely Clinton will be charged with wrongdoing."