By Tom Blumer | October 19, 2016 | 4:44 PM EDT

The federal government's fiscal year ended on September 30. As has been the administration's habit for years with news that might draw negative attention, the Treasury Department conveniently released its year-end Monthly Budget Review Friday afternoon to minimize the discussion of its grim news.

The government ran a $587 billion deficit, up from $414 billion the previous year. Andrew Taylor's coverage at the Associated Press glossed over why this occurred, because to do so would call into doubt the questionable Congressional Budget Office projections for future years he relied on to reassure readers that the situation is, in the words of an economist he quoted, "totally manageable." The other two main business wire services performed a bit better, but still missed several key items.

By Matthew Balan | October 19, 2016 | 1:52 PM EDT

CBS was the only Big Three network on Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning to continue reporting on the allegations of a quid pro quo between the FBI and the State Department related to Hillary Clinton's e-mail scandal. CBS Evening News's Scott Pelley gave a brief about Undersecretary of State Patrick Kennedy's denial of a quid pro quo. The following morning, Charlie Rose gave a brief on Wednesday's CBS This Morning about a former FBI official admitting that he proposed it.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | October 18, 2016 | 12:29 AM EDT

A brand new chapter in the Hillary Clinton personal e-mail server saga opened up Monday, as newly released FBI notes revealed a possible quid pro quo between the agency and the State Department. According to the notes State Department official Pat Kennedy wanted a classified Clinton e-mail to be marked unclassified in exchange for the FBI to expand their overseas presence. But ABC and NBC decided to downplay the stunning revelations on their evening broadcasts and instead touted the Clinton campaign’s expansion into “red states.” 

By Tom Blumer | October 16, 2016 | 11:40 PM EDT

A search at the Associated Press's main national site on "Podesta Iran" (not in quotes) returns no items relating to a Wikileaks-released email exposing how Hillary Clinton 2016 campaign manager John Podesta agreed with a Republican senator in July 2015 that the deal which had been "negotiated" by the Obama administration with Iran would lead to "a nuclear war in the Persian Gulf." (The word "negotiated" is in quotes because, other than releasing hostages it never should have captured or held, Iran appears not to have given up anything.)

There's a reason beyond the routine journalistic negligence for which AP is so well-known why it has ignored this (excuse the pun) bombshell. The AP's own self-congratulatory actions contributed to the situation Podesta tersely acknowledged.

By Tom Blumer | October 13, 2016 | 3:17 PM EDT

This latest edition of "Stupid Fact Checks" by Hillary Clinton lapdogs in the press comes from NBC, with follow-up help from the Politico, and is an entry in two categories: "False Equivalency" and "Subsequent Goalpost Moving."

In Sunday's second presidential debate, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump correctly stated that Mrs. Clinton "was there as Secretary of State with the so-called line in the sand." Mrs. Clinton said, "No I wasn't." But she was there when President Barack Obama made his statement threatening action if Syria were to use chemical weapons. NBC's "fact-check" evaluation: "Everyone Is Wrong Here." That's because Trump forgot to describe Obama's "line" as "red." Seriously. An NBC reporter also worked after the fact to cover up her own mistake over Mrs. Clinton's indisputably obvious error.

By Tom Blumer | October 12, 2016 | 5:39 AM EDT

The Democrats insist that "voter fraud is very rare" and that "voter impersonation is nearly non-existent." The press has consistently almost completely ignored evidence that voter fraud and voter impersonation are serious and growing problems.

One can expect that indifference will continue to be the norm even after the latest video produced by James O'Keefe's Project Veritas. The video shows a Democratic Commissioner of the Board of Elections Alan Schulkin of New York County, which is the county-level name for the Manhattan borough of New York City, at a holiday party in December 2015 "admitting that there is widespread voter fraud in New York City."

By Tom Blumer | October 10, 2016 | 10:08 PM EDT

Former late-night TV host David Letterman was famous for his entertaining and fun "Stupid Pet Tricks" segments.

In the current presidential election cycle, the press, while claiming that Donald Trump and his campaign lie so often that the backlog of required genuine fact-checking on important matters is sky-high, is instead engaging in a non-entertaining, not at all fun effort known as "Stupid Fact Checks." If there are so many obvious lies out there, why did NBC and USA Today do unbelievably "Stupid Fact Checks" which focused on Trump's description of the product and cost involved in the Hillary Clinton-ordered deletion of over 30,000 emails her legal team unilaterally decided were all personal?

By Tom Blumer | October 9, 2016 | 2:56 PM EDT

As Mike Ciandella at NewsBusters noted Thursday morning, newly obtained documents indicate that the White House and Secretary of State John Kerry's underlings worked aggressively to "crush" any chance that he might be questioned about Hillary Clinton's use of a personal email account for public business or her stationing of a private server registered under a pseudonym at her Chappaqua, New York home on the March 15 edition of Face the Nation — and he wasn't. Fox News, apparently alone among the major broadcast and cable networks, aired a segment on the matter on Friday. It included a weak response from CBS News. Additionally, a review of the transcript from the related Face the Nation broadcast shows that Mrs. Clinton's email and private server were discussed — just not with Kerry.

By Tom Blumer | October 9, 2016 | 2:01 PM EDT

Many writers on the left and beat journalists in the establishment press contend that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and running mate Mike Pence tell lies so often that it's virtually impossible to keep up with all of them.

If that's so, why, with all those "obvious" falsehoods out there, did two Los Angeles Times reporters have to label an absolutely true statement by Pence about Hillary Clinton's Syrian refugee position "misleading" and then fail, as seen in a Friday NewsBusters post, to even try to explain why it was? And why did the Associated Press's Josh Boak, as will be shown after the jump, pretend on Tuesday that Pence's absolutely true claim about the growth of the national debt under President Obama wasn't true?

By Tom Blumer | October 8, 2016 | 5:46 PM EDT

Assuming it thinks that orchestrated voter registration fraud and fraudulent voting are legitimate problems, the Associated Press's Friday attempt to explain the developing situation in Indiana on Friday was woefully incomplete. Unlike in other instances of documented and alleged fraud cited during this election cycle, and perhaps only because law enforcement is involved, the AP has at least given the Indiana situation national attention. But after two shorter stories describing the growing scope of the probe to nine Hoosier State counties and then to 57 (now 56), a Friday "answers" dispatch by Rick Callahan provided woefully insufficient detail about the ACORN-like group behind the alleged fraud under investigation.

By Tom Blumer | October 7, 2016 | 1:03 PM EDT

Media "fact-checkers" have finally arrived to the point where unpleasant facts stated by people they consider unpleasant can simply be labeled "misleading," and dismissed without anything resembling a coherent explanation.

Apparently Kurtis Lee and Seema Mehta at the Los Angeles Times have access to a special Newspeak news media version of the dictionary which contains a definition of "misleading" differing from the real dictionary: "deceptive; tending to mislead" ("mislead" as a verb primarily means "to lead or guide wrongly; lead astray"). They're using their Newspeak definition to claim that a completely factual statement by Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence about U.S. plans to accept Syrian refugees, which they label an "accusation" in their headline, is, well, "misleading."

By Tom Blumer | October 5, 2016 | 4:30 PM EDT

On Sunday, I posted on the saga of Andrew Spieles, a member of the Young Democrats at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia who admitted to submitting fraudulent voter registrations for 19 dead people, and the national press's virtually complete disinterest in covering the story.

Spieles' activities, which have gained the attention of but not yet prosecution by law enforcement, represent child's play in comparison to the horrible findings reported Friday by the Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) and the Virginia Voter’s Alliance (VVA) after an investigation relating to only a small portion of the state's voter-registration rolls.