ABC's Moran Hypes Dem Talking Points on ObamaCare: Women Would Have Suffered Most

Good Morning America's Terry Moran on Thursday hyped Democratic talking points, parroting fears that if ObamaCare was struck down, women would suffer more. Moran ran through the President's complaints.

He fretted, "And, finally, a lot of people haven't paid much attention to this: Women will pay more. Right now, women pay more for health care than men." (Moran didn't mention how much Americans would, overall, pay more in taxes, should the law stand long term.) The journalist added, "Insurance companies charge them more. This bill outlawed that. If it goes, that goes."

Moran made sure to run through the ramifications of striking down the entire law and the "popular provisions":

TERRY MORAN: But specifically, say the court strikes the whole thing down, the things that go away: One, the big thing. There will be no compulsory insurance. That individual mandate that you buy insurance, that will go away. Two, pre-existing conditions will count. Insurers will be able to deny insurance on the basis of pre-existing conditions if this law falls. That's the most popular part of the law.

GMA anchor George Stephanopoulos sees the ruling sending "shockwaves" through the presidential race.

A transcript of the segment can be found below.


06/28/12
7am tease

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Breaking this morning, decision day. The Supreme Court set to hand down that landmark health care ruling this morning. It will affect all of us. And hundreds are already lined up at the court right now. The ruling will send shock waves through the race for president.

7:07

STEPHANOPOULOS: Now, to the landmark decision coming later today from the Supreme Court. Up or down on President Obama's health care law. How the court rules will affect every American. It's also certain to shake up the race for president. So, let's look at all of the consequences with Terry Moran at the Supreme Court. Jake Tapper at the White House. And, Terry, up or down are two of the options. Actually, the court could also choose some kind of middle path. Whatever they choose, so much is at stake.

TERRY MORAN: Absolutely, George. This is the future of health care in America. It's also the future relationship between government and individual citizens. But specifically, say the court strikes the whole thing down, the things that go away: One, the big thing. There will be no compulsory insurance. That individual mandate that you buy insurance, that will go away. Two, pre-existing conditions will count. Insurers will be able to deny insurance on the basis of pre-existing conditions if this law falls. That's the most popular part of the law. And, finally, a lot of people haven't paid much attention to this: Women will pay more. Right now, women pay more for health care than men. Insurance companies charge them more. This bill outlawed that. If it goes, that goes.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And, Jake, both presidential campaigns, of course, braced to respond today. Governor Romney already signaling that unless the court strikes everything down, he's going to stick to his position of complete repeal and then replacing. The White House has several different options ready depending on what the court decides.

TAPPER: That's right. They have an option and a campaign strategy for the court upholding the law, for that bloody mess scenario when the court strikes down some of it but not all of it and then, of course, for the court striking down the entire law. You're going to hear from Democrats, a very aggressive defense of the bill in either of the two last scenarios, George. And President Obama has signaled if it is the middle scenario, some of the law is struck down but not all of it, you'll hear him talking about what has been upheld. All of the good things in his view, that remains on the books.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Terry, a lot at stake for the court, as well. Is it fair to assume that chief Justice Roberts will take this decision himself?

MORAN: Probably that's the betting here. But the swing vote, as in every one of these cases, Justice Anthony Kennedy. It's awesome, the power this man has. He seems skeptical of the law in oral arguments. He's a westerner with a libertarian streak. But this is a guy whose favorite play is Hamlet. So, go figure.

Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock is the senior news analyst for the Media Research Center and a contributing editor for NewsBusters.org