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By Kyle Drennen | | May 3, 2016 | 1:07 PM EDT

After 50 days of the network news censoring Hillary Clinton’s stated plan to cripple the coal industry in pursuit of a left-wing climate change agenda, on Tuesday, all three network morning shows finally covered the comments after a laid off West Virginia coal miner confronted the Democratic frontrunner. During an otherwise staged campaign round table discussion on Monday, unemployed coal miner Bo Copley cited Clinton’s comments during a March 13 CNN town hall that “We're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.”

By Scott Whitlock | | May 3, 2016 | 12:32 PM EDT

The co-hosts of The View on Tuesday leapt to the defense of Hillary Clinton after she was put on the spot by a West Virginia coal mineer. While talking to voters, the individual demanded to know how Clinton can call herself a “friend” of the state after saying, “We’re going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.” View co-host and ABC News journalist Paula Faris spun for Clinton: “This is a classic case, though, of listening to just part of the sound bite though. We do this all the time.” Co-host Sunny Hostin agreed, “We're not being fair. I was just going to say that.” 

By Geoffrey Dickens | | May 3, 2016 | 12:21 PM EDT

After Ted Cruz criticized Donald Trump for a National Enquirer-inspired accusation that Cruz’s father Rafael was linked to the JFK assassination, MSNBC host Tamron Hall actually had the audacity to ask “Is this a man unraveling?” During the 11 am hour of MSNBC’s The Place for Politics, on Tuesday, Hall brought on Republican strategist Susan Del Percio to dissect Cruz’s press conference where the Texas Senator defended not only his father but his wife

By Daniel Garza | | May 3, 2016 | 12:02 PM EDT

Leave it to Fusion, Univision’s sister English-language network, to once again find a way to smear House Speaker Paul Ryan and all Republicans when covering the Speaker’s latest statements on U.S. immigration policy. The network’s report on Ryan’s remarks, titled Top Republican says some shockingly reasonable things about undocumented immigrants, paints the Speaker as out of step with most Republicans on immigration and specifically faults him for not working with President Obama to pass immigration reform legislation.

By Tim Graham | | May 3, 2016 | 11:45 AM EDT

In 2013, NPR host Rachel Martin spent eight minutes of taxpayer-subsidized air time on the last Sunday before Christmas promoting the atheist band Bad Religion wrecking Christmas songs and found no time to question if it offended.

NPR devoted almost 12 minutes to promoting atheist actor/writer Ricky Gervais on the morning of May 1.  Weekend Edition Sunday anchor Rachel Martin found a piety worth defending. She hounded Gervais about being insensitive to Bruce “Caitlyn” Jenner and the “trans community.” Gervais surely raised some liberal eyebrows for testily responding “I hope we’re all grown-ups” when it comes to Jenner humor.

By Mark Finkelstein | | May 3, 2016 | 10:24 AM EDT

One of our media bias categories at NewsBusters is Double Standards. There was a classic example of the phenomenon on today's Morning Joe. The show's running theme was relentless mockery and ridicule of Ted Cruz for crossing the street yesterday to calmly debate a group of Trump supporters. 

But later in the show, when a clip was run of Hillary being confronted by a West Virginian over her boast that she would "put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business," the panel reverentially praised Clinton, giving her "credit" for her courage in doing so. The panel had the chutzpah to insist that Hillary's moment was "organic" and wasn't staged. Really? She's sitting around a table with a handful of voters. Is Morning Joe asking us to believe that the former coal company worker wasn't hand picked and that Hillary wasn't fully briefed on what to expect? Please. Earlier, Mika Brzezinski actually introduced the Cruz segment by saying it was an example of someone "choking like a dog." The double standard was glaring and outrageous.

By Rich Noyes | | May 3, 2016 | 8:45 AM EDT

A look at the past four months of news coverage shows Donald Trump received three times as much TV news coverage as his closest rival, Ted Cruz, and a whopping 15 times as much as John Kasich. On the Democratic side, however, the gap was much narrower, with Bernie Sanders getting more than two minutes of TV news coverage for every three minutes given to Hillary Clinton. In other words, the Democratic race was treated as an actual contest between Clinton and Sanders, while TV news coverage of the GOP race was organized around Donald Trump, with his competitors treated as afterthoughts.

By Tim Graham | | May 3, 2016 | 6:10 AM EDT

New York Times media columnist Jim Rutenberg likes how Comedy Central host Larry Wilmore “keeps it 100" (percent honest). So he declared in Monday’s newspaper that Wilmore and his fellow Comedy Central host Trevor Noah aren’t up the task of satirizing the 2016 campaign. In a story on Stephen Colbert revamping his Late Show on CBS, Rutenberg lamented there is a “Where Is Superman?” feeling about Jon Stewart and Colbert sitting this one out – not just in “Left America,” but yes, in “Media America.”

By Brad Wilmouth | | May 3, 2016 | 12:54 AM EDT

On Monday's Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN, after New York magazine's Andrew Sullivan slammed Donald Trump's proposal for a temporary ban on Muslim immigrants, host Anderson Cooper grasped at straws to suggest an equivalence with banning Jews because "Jewish extremists" have "committed acts of terrorism against Israeli leaders" as he pushed back against conservative CNN commentator Kayleigh McEnany's support for Trump's plan.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | | May 2, 2016 | 11:07 PM EDT

The White House has been coming under increasing pressure in recent days calling for the public release of 28 pages that were omitted from the 9/11 Commission Report. Many speculate that the pages contain evidence that Saudi Arabia aided in the attacks and Charles Krauthammer and Laura Ingraham dialed up their own presser Monday on Fox's Special Report with Bret Baier. Both called for pages to be released to the public. 

By Jack Coleman | | May 2, 2016 | 11:00 PM EDT

Hundreds of thousands one year, hundreds of thousands more the next. At some point all those dead babies start adding up, regardless of whether Eleanor Clift looks the other way. The Daily Beast columnist, in her recurring gig as a panelist on The McLaughlin Group, did her part over the weekend to defend the industrial-scale abortionists at Planned Parenthood.

By Curtis Houck | | May 2, 2016 | 10:30 PM EDT

Leading off Monday's All In on MSNBC, host Chris Hayes and his fellow panelists giggled their way through a discussion about the possible collapse of the Never Trump movement to the point that they predicted that the push by conservatives to not support the billionaire frontrunner is on a "slow death march" to accepting and backing his nomination.

By Edgard Portela | | May 2, 2016 | 9:55 PM EDT

If you were depending on Telemundo or Univision for your news as Puerto Rico careened toward its largest default yet on May Day 2016, you would have to be forgiven for having absolutely no idea about the real causes behind the territory’s massive default, including a public sector apparatus that has remained pathetically addicted to unsustainable levels of spending at all levels.

By Kristine Marsh | | May 2, 2016 | 9:45 PM EDT

The evening news broadcasts set the negative tone for Ted Cruz Monday night, all virtually predicting that Cruz would lose to Trump and his chances at the nomination were slim to none.

By Tom Johnson | | May 2, 2016 | 9:34 PM EDT

In March of 2013, the Republican National Committee issued what soon became known as the “autopsy report,” which discussed how the party might improve its chances of winning presidential elections. Last Thursday in The Atlantic, reform conservative (or former conservative) Frum provided the GOP with a sort of pre-autopsy document that it might consult after Donald Trump’s “almost certain failure in November.”

Frum argued that conservatives need a new approach which avoids both “toxic” Trumpism and “the entrepreneur worship of the past few years.” He mused that “much of the old conservative message is out of date. Not all of it, but much. Yet the people who formed the conservative coalition remain. They’ve misplaced their faith and trust in Donald Trump. But then, it’s not as if their faith and trust were honored by the party’s plutocratic former leadership, either.”