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By Tim Graham | September 11, 2014 | 6:42 PM EDT

Flag-burning used to be a free-speech cause celebre in the liberal media, back when Maoists were burning the American flag. But the media isn’t paying attention to the new “Burn ISIS Flag Challenge.”

By Scott Whitlock | September 11, 2014 | 5:09 PM EDT

In 2012, gaffes and scandals by Republican candidates, such as Todd Akin, prompted a wave of coverage by the three networks. Yet, ill-conceived comments by Democrats in the 2014 midterms have created no such interest. Incumbent Democratic Senator Mark Udall made this cringe-inducing comment during last week's debate in Colorado. Speaking of two beheaded Americans, he insisted, "Steve Sotloff and James Foley would tell us, don't be impulsive. Horrible and barbarous as those executions were, don't be impulsive." 

By Kyle Drennen | September 11, 2014 | 5:08 PM EDT

On Thursday's NBC Today, several hours after NBC chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel ripped President Obama's strategy to combat ISIS as being "wildly off-base," correspondent Peter Alexander promoted the commander-in-chief's Wednesday primetime address: "President Obama announced that he would lead a broad coalition to destroy ISIS....The war will be more like those in Yemen and Somalia, Mr. Obama stressed..." [Listen to the audio]

At the core of Engel's criticism of the President was the notion that the same strategy used to combat Al Qaeda forces in places like Yemen and Somalia could also be used to fight ISIS in Syria and Iraq. Engel dismissed the idea as "an oversimplification of the problem," warning that the situations were "not comparable at all."

By Ken Shepherd | September 11, 2014 | 4:51 PM EDT

A sixth grade teacher at Washington, D.C.'s McKinley Middle School gave students an assignment asking that they compare George W. Bush and his "abuse of power" with that of the late Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler. Local NBC-owned Washington station WRC-TV's Derrick Ward covered the controversy on the September 10 evening newscast. But the following morning, none of the Big Three morning newscasts so much  as mentioned the story.

By Cheri Jacobus | September 11, 2014 | 3:30 PM EDT

At the outset of war in 2003, Andrea Mitchell mocked Bush's "coalition of the willing" as a "show." But now, she's promoting the Obama coalition-building and praising his "reaching out" to foreign policy experts for advice at dinner parties.

By Geoffrey Dickens | September 11, 2014 | 2:07 PM EDT

On this 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, ABC, CBS, NBC and MSNBC appropriately devoted time to commemorating that tragic day in our history. But today also marks the second anniversary of the Benghazi attacks that led to the deaths of U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens, foreign service officer Sean Smith and two CIA contractors, Tyrone Woods and Glenn Doherty.

So how much time did the Big Three and MSNBC, on Thursday morning, devote to their memories and the surrounding controversy around the attack? Zero seconds. 

By Jeffrey Meyer | September 11, 2014 | 1:57 PM EDT

In the wake of President Obama announcing that the United States will use air strikes to target the terrorist group ISIS in Iraq and Syria, the Washington Post’s Dana Milbank decided to go after liberals’ favorite punching bag, former Vice President Dick Cheney.

In an op-ed that appeared in Thursday’s Washington Post, Milbank proclaimed “Dick Cheney, Still Blindly Beating The Drums of War.” The Post columnist proceeded to trash the Republican for daring to suggest that the United States should aggressively go on the offensive to eliminate the ISIS threat.

By Tom Blumer | September 11, 2014 | 1:38 PM EDT

A new Gallup poll reports that Americans trust the federal government less than they ever have. Given that President Obama has increasingly insisted on acting on his own, it's not unreasonable to infer that this result means, consistent with other polling the press has stubbornly ignored — documented in a new Media Research Center study — that they also trust his leadership less than they ever have.

Gallup's main headline dressed up the results up by focusing on only half of what it found: "Trust in Federal Gov't on International Issues at New Low." But the subheadline says, "Americans' trust in government handling of domestic problems also at record low." Okay, guys. What problems aren't either domestic, international, or a combination of both? So trust in the federal government to handle any problems is at an all-time low. How tough is it to say that?

By Tim Graham | September 11, 2014 | 1:13 PM EDT

In today’s Biased Headlines department, see today’s Reid Wilson report on the Washington Post website from Wednesday: “Nevada is about to pass the biggest corporate tax giveaway in its history.”

But has the Post recently described welfare programs or food stamps as a "giveaway"? It doesn't look like it.

By Scott Whitlock | September 11, 2014 | 12:43 PM EDT

All three network morning shows on Thursday highlighted Barack Obama's primetime speech from the night before, promoting his talk of a "broad coalition." Yet, Germany and Britain have announced that they won't take part in the President's planned air strikes. In 2003, ABC, NBC and CBS hit George W. Bush for "going it alone" with a coalition of 18 countries. 

By Tom Blumer | September 11, 2014 | 10:55 AM EDT

As the midnight oil-burning Curtis Houck at NewsBusters noted last night, John McCain ripped into Jay Carney's attempts to rewrite history Wednesday evening on CNN. Among other things, he reminded the former White House Press Secretary that "We had it (the Iraq War) won, thanks to the surge." In other words, our military and Iraqi government had achieved victory. Barack Obama and his administration, perhaps until last night, have seemed indifferent at best and dismissive at worst at what has happened in Iraq since then.

After McCain got in his rips, it was Newt Gingrich's turn. The former House Speaker, whose assertion, as will be seen later, is supported by contemporaneous reporting by Tim Arango at the New York Times, took apart Carney's hypocrisy in whining about how a status of forces agreement with Iraq with the number of American troops our generals believed would be necessary to maintain the peace would have meant our presence there "in perpetuity":

By Mark Finkelstein | September 11, 2014 | 8:38 AM EDT

President Obama is a great leader.  Really.  Just ask him. Seemingly ignored in the coverage of the president's ISIS speech last night was the moment when President Obama claimed that the ISIS threat was being met with "strength and resolve," then boasted that his strategy—and by extension he himself—represented "American leadership at its best."

Can anyone imagine truly great American leaders--from Washington to Lincoln to Reagan--feeling the need to claim that their plans represented "American leadership at its best?"

By Matthew Philbin and Katie Yoder | September 11, 2014 | 8:14 AM EDT

Qatar-owned network avoided Hamas ‘terror,’ Israeli casualties.

By Curtis Houck | September 11, 2014 | 7:07 AM EDT

After President Obama’s speech to the nation on Wednesday night, MSNBC host Rachel Maddow asked NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel what he thought of President Obama’s analogy that the U.S. strategy in fighting terrorism in Yemen and Somalia would carry over to dealing with the Islamic terrorist group ISIS in both Iraq and Syria. Needless to say, Engel was not at all pleased with the comparison the President made, telling Maddow immediately that “I think it is wildly off base, frankly” and “[i]t's an oversimplification of the problem.”

By Randy Hall | September 11, 2014 | 7:06 AM EDT

Disappointed on the far left, Michael Moore tells Obama, "When the history is written of this era, this is how you’ll be remembered: “He was the first black president.…Eight years of your life, and that’s what people are going to remember....That's it."