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By Ken Shepherd | February 11, 2015 | 8:53 PM EST

Race-obsessed Hardball host Chris Matthews seems to have used the occasion of his February 11 interview with David Axelrod to puff up the former Obama campaign strategist as a gallant white liberal riding to the rescue of black Democratic politicians.

By P.J. Gladnick | February 11, 2015 | 8:47 PM EST

It wasn't what CNBC hosts Simon Hobbs nor Sarah Eisen expected or wanted to hear. In stark contrast to the upbeat Federal Reserve forecasts, Steven Ricchiuto, chief economist of Mizuho Securities weighed in with a distinctly glum picture of the near future.
 

By Curtis Houck | February 11, 2015 | 8:27 PM EST

On its first broadcast since the announcement of anchor Brian Williams’s suspension, NBC Nightly News took the step of dropping both Williams’s name from the program’s title, opening graphics, recorded introduction, mastead of the show's website, and Twitter account. Following four teasers from now-interim anchor Lester Holt, the opening theme of the program was played as normal, but instead of a recorded announcement from actor Michael Douglas, a separate recording by another voice was used that told viewers “this is NBC Nightly News” and “reporting tonight, Lester Holt.”

By Mark Finkelstein | February 11, 2015 | 8:21 PM EST

Imagine a Fox News host making an unflattering remark about some aspect of Hillary Clinton's appearance. Now imagine the MSM going into 24/7 outrage mode.

But on tonight's Hardball, Chris Matthews casually referred to Chris Christie as "the fat guy from New Jersey." And in walking back the crack, Matthews actually compounded his mistake.  Rather than acknowledging that it's simply wrong to insult someone for his obesity, Matthews instead observed that he shouldn't call Christie a fat guy, because "he's losing weight." So fat cracks are fine if the target is actually fat?

By Jack Coleman | February 11, 2015 | 7:09 PM EST

A seismic shakeup in media yesterday with NBC News announcing a six-month suspension without pay for serial fabulist Brian Williams, while Comedy Central's Jon Stewart revealed he's leaving The Daily Show at the end of this season.

The two departures are indirectly connected, Rush Limbaugh told radio listeners today, and bolster his long-held belief that "NBC is not a news organization any more."
 

By Matthew Balan | February 11, 2015 | 6:30 PM EST

Tabloid TV host Jerry Springer sang the praises of the supposedly "smart," "funny," and "witty" Keith Olbermann in a Wednesday post on Twitter, and proposed that the former MSNBC host should become Jon Stewart's successor at The Daily Show.

By Tom Johnson | February 11, 2015 | 6:07 PM EST

Ken Auletta reports that Williams had agreed to a suspension but “wanted a declaration by NBC that he would return as an evening-news anchor.” NBCUniversal CEO Steve Burke, “torn between wanting to take a hard line and feeling compassion for Williams,” sought Brokaw’s counsel regarding the matter. After Brokaw said he was “concerned about the effects of Williams’s actions on the reputation of the rank and file in the news division,” Burke decided to make the suspension “non-negotiable.”

By Ken Shepherd | February 11, 2015 | 5:18 PM EST

The Smoking Gun website has a great question today that the suits at NBC Universal really should be pressed to answer. Hint, it involves a certain Baptist preacher with his own show on MSNBC who has a penchant for repeatedly violating the Ninth Commandment (among others).

By Tom Blumer | February 11, 2015 | 5:14 PM EST

By yesterday afternoon, the Obama administration recognized that it had a serious problem on its hands. Zeke Miller at Time.com reported that 2008 presidential campaign manager and longtime adviser David Axelord's book revealed that, in Miller's words, "Barack Obama misled Americans for his own political benefit when he claimed in the 2008 election to oppose same sex marriage for religious reasons." Obama never opposed same-sex marriage, but acted on advice from Axelrod and others to act as if he did during the campaign.

Axelrod's claim generated enough coverage that Team Obama knew that even the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, was going to have to do some kind of story on his adviser's revelation. So how to do damage control without creating the kind of stir which would force the network broadcasters to inform low-information voters of the core deception? That's easy. Throw all pretenses of presidential dignity out the window and go to (holy moly) Buzzfeed.

By Kyle Drennen | February 11, 2015 | 5:09 PM EST

Reacting to the decision by NBC News to suspend NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams for six months following his Iraq war lies, Today 9 a.m. hour co-host Willie Geist acknowledged it was "kind of a difficult and strange morning." Fellow co-host Natalie Morales added: "...it is a difficult day here and we are certainly sharing our best wishes with Brian. It's a tough time for him and his family, so we hope and pray for the best."

By Joseph Rossell | February 11, 2015 | 5:05 PM EST

CBS "Evening News" attempted to show that there is no link between vaccines and autism on February 10, but seemed confused that anti-vaccination views got "traction at all."

CBS News National Correspondent Jim Axelrod did a good job of showing how a "discredited" study by Dr. Andrew Wakefield scared parents away from the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, but he failed to acknowledge that his own network played a part in that fearmongering.

By Jorge Bonilla | February 11, 2015 | 4:51 PM EST

It turns out that former North Carolina Senator John Edwards was right and there are, in fact, two Americas. In one America, concerns over an unsecure border vis-à-vis potential ISIS threats and the spread of communicable disease are totally reasonable and given a fair hearing. In the other America (pun fully intended), a network news program ostensibly solely devoted to the preservation of Obama’s Coalition of the Ascendant flippantly dismisses such concerns as racist paranoia, and no rebuttal need be sought or offered.

By Scott Whitlock | February 11, 2015 | 4:46 PM EST

In the wake of a six month suspension for NBC anchor Brian Williams, ABC and CBS on Wednesday offered mocking coverage of their competitor's downfall. New York Times reporter David Carr appeared on CBS This Morning to deride: "...Everyone, including Brian, thought he was maybe too big to fail...Turns out, he's not the most important thing." 

By Melissa Mullins | February 11, 2015 | 3:46 PM EST

Sharyl Attkisson knows a thing or two about media bias.  After all, it was Attkisson who blew the lid off CBS's blatant bias favoring the president and his administration in her recent book Stonewalled: My Fight for Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation, and Harassment in Obama's Washington.
 
On Monday, Attkisson appeared  on The Steve Malzberg Show on Newsmax TV, and told him she couldn’t understand how Hillary Clinton, a former secretary of state and presidential candidate, could withstand such a scandal, while NBC News anchor Brian Williams may not. Attkisson was a reporter acommpanying Hillary Clinton in Bosnia, and realized Hillary’s lie after NewsBusters unearthed the video.

By Matthew Balan | February 11, 2015 | 3:46 PM EST

On Wednesday's CNN Newsroom, Mark Feldstein channeled Michael Moore's take on the Brian Williams scandal. The former CNN journalist acknowledged that Williams likely wouldn't recover the "traditional credibility that he had as a news anchor," but later fell into the same Bush bashing as Moore: "Is it as bad a scandal as telling lies about the Iraq War to get us into it, as the Bush administration did? No. But in journalistic circles, telling a lie is the cardinal sin."