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By Tim Graham | January 8, 2015 | 9:05 AM EST

Edward Wong, the Beijing bureau chief of The New York Times, came under attack from conservatives for what Dana Loesch called the “idiotic tweet of the night.”

Wong tweeted: “Some call for an extreme use of force to respond to Paris attacks, but school shootings in US have killed more and US leaders do nothing.” Then Wong deleted it.

By Tom Blumer | January 8, 2015 | 1:38 AM EST

At 4:45 p.m. Wednesday afternoon, the New York Times, teasing an item entitled "‘Dangerous Moment’ for Europe, as Fear and Resentment Grow," tweeted that "The Paris terror attack seems certain to accelerate the growth of anti-Islamic sentiment in Europe."

Consistent with a long-established nasty habit, the opening sentence of the report by Steven Erlanger and Katrin Bennhold has since been revised without notice, and is tagged as appearing on Thursday's front page. The headline is the same, but the first sentence now reads: "The sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam staggered a continent already seething with anti-immigrant sentiments in some quarters, feeding far-right nationalist parties like France’s National Front." Yeah, those are Europe's biggest problems, not Islamic terrorism.

By Curtis Houck | January 8, 2015 | 12:15 AM EST

Following the deadly Islamic terrorist attack in Paris on Wednesday, major broadcast networks ABC and NBC joined other news outlets in not showing any of the controversial cartoons of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad from the Charlie Hebdo magazine during their evening newscasts.

Despite initially telling Buzzfeed that they would not be showing any of the cartoons, CBS News did go forward and displayed three of them on the air during the CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley. The three were shown as part of a report by CBS News foreign correspondent Elizabeth Palmer from Paris that led off the broadcast.

By Tom Johnson | January 7, 2015 | 9:44 PM EST

Chait writes that “the Muslim radical argues that the ban on blasphemy is morally right and should be followed; the Western liberal insists it is morally wrong but should be followed. Theoretical distinctions aside, both positions yield an identical outcome.”

By Curtis Houck | January 7, 2015 | 9:33 PM EST

On Wednesday night, the “big three” of ABC, CBS, and NBC ignored the contradicting statements made by President Obama in condemning the terrorist attack on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper in Paris as an attack on free speech, but stating in a 2012 speech at the United Nations that “the future does not belong to those who slander the Prophet of Islam.”

When it came to discussing the terrorist attack in France on Wednesday, the President struck a different tone from 2012 when it came to the freedom of speech and expression: “Our universal belief in freedom of expression is something that can't be silenced because of the senseless violence of the few.”

By Tom Blumer | January 7, 2015 | 9:28 PM EST

In an item time-stamped 4:11 p.m. ET at his "On Media" blog at the Politico, Dylan Byers wrapped up a post primarily about the Associated Press removing its "Piss Christ" photo from its image library by claiming, in reference to the Charlie Hebdo Magazine murders in Paris, that "Though there (sic) identity is as yet unknown, the masked gunmen are believed to be Islamic terrorists."

Here's most of Byers' post about the outrageous hypocrisy at AP, which shortly affter the massacre had publicly announced that it would not show any Charlie Hebdo Islamic cartoon images:

By Ken Shepherd | January 7, 2015 | 8:49 PM EST

Hardball host Chris Matthews is no rightie, but when it comes to Islamist terrorism, he takes a decidedly more conservative posture than others on his network. Witness Matthews's opening tease to Hardball tonight.

By Matthew Balan | January 7, 2015 | 7:27 PM EST

On Wednesday's Now With Alex Wagner on MSNBC, Eric Bates raised the specter of censorship by Christian conservatives during a panel discussion on the past Muslim backlash against Charlie Hebdo magazine – the target of an Islamic terrorist attack in Paris earlier in the day. Bates, a former executive editor for Rolling Stone magazine, cited Jerry Falwell's lawsuit against porn magazine Hustler in the 1980s as an apparent example of "religious fundamentalists of all stripes and of nationalities have this penchant to say, we want to be able tell you what you can and can't portray."

By Tom Blumer | January 7, 2015 | 6:14 PM EST

This afternoon, Matt Balan at NewsBusters covered Tony Barber's disgraceful evening (London Time) column at the Financial Times. In the wake of the terrorist attack at the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo which killed 12, Barber argued that "some common sense would be useful at publications such as Charlie Hebdo, and Denmark’s Jyllands-Posten." In other words, after sifting out the myriad paragraphs of weasel words and historical rehashes, Barber was contending that these outlets should self-censor to protect jihadists' delicate sensibilities.

Balan indicated that Barber is an associate editor at the Times, so readers could very well have interpreted the columnist's take as speaking for the newspaper. That is not so, as seen in its house editorial:

By Ken Shepherd | January 7, 2015 | 5:15 PM EST

"Obama agenda, meet the wrecking ball," the Daily Beast's Patricia Murphy groused as she opened her January 7 piece, "The Republican War on Kale." Murphy took issue with Senate Republicans setting their sights on a wildly unpopular element of the Obama agenda: the federal overhaul of school-lunch programs all over the country.

By Tom Blumer | January 7, 2015 | 4:29 PM EST

Correction: This post originally referred to Variety as the publication involved. It was Vanity Fair, and the text below has been corrected to reflect that.

At the Daily Beast on Tuesday, Vicky Ward, who profiled Jeffrey Epstein for Vanity Fair Magazine in early 2003, revealed that she and Graydon Carter, the publication's editor, were aware of and had specific details about the convicted ultrarich creep's sexual episodes with underage girls. They also apparently had proof that Epstein had forged denial documents from two of his victims. Epstein had recently become publicly visible as a result of his 2002 African travels with former President Bill Clinton.

At the last minute, Carter almost completely spiked the sexual elements of Ward's story, leaving only vague references to Victoria's Secret models, a party "filled ... with young Russian models" and to "beautiful women ... whisked off to Little St. James (in the Virgin Islands)." The published product focused almost entirely on the mystery of Epstein's career as a broker, including his admission to securities law violations, his subsequent business dealings, and his quirky but often lavish purchases and lifestyle.

By Scott Whitlock | January 7, 2015 | 3:47 PM EST

On the day that 12 people were murdered for publishing satirical cartoons about Islam, Daily Beast foreign editor Christopher Dickey on Wednesday fretted about how the "extreme right" of Europe played a role in increasing the conflict with Muslims.

By Jeffrey Meyer | January 7, 2015 | 3:39 PM EST

On Tuesday night, PBS aired its latest Frontline documentary aimed at attacking the NRA entitled "Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA." On multiple occasions, the program did its best to promote the activities of anti-gun activists while discrediting the efforts of the NRA to protect the Second Amendment. Throughout the hour long special, Frontline reporter Jim Gilmore highlighted several mass shootings over the past three decades, and the program expressed dismay at how the NRA could continue to successfully promote its agenda despite several high-profile shootings in America.

By Kyle Drennen | January 7, 2015 | 2:52 PM EST

Appearing on Wednesday's NBC Today to promote his new film Birdman, actor Michael Keaton oddly started the interview by taking a jab at the new Republican Senate Majority Leader: "...let me just read something. This is just too good. Mitch McConnell – this is from our boy, Mitch...Here's what he says, 'We all know that one of the things the Senate is best at doing is not doing much,' he said. 'Why don't we get started?' Why don't we get started at not doing much? Thanks, Mitch."

By Kristine Marsh | January 7, 2015 | 1:40 PM EST

Whenever a terrorist attack happens, it seems like the media jump through hoops to whitewash the incident to avoid using the dreaded “I” word. While it’s obvious to the public that the guy shouting “Allahu Akbar” during a televised beheading is probably not a practicing Methodist, the media would first speculate that he might be a white conservative, as they initially did with the Boston bombing. The latest deadly shooting on a French newspaper office that killed12 people is turning out to be another case of the media protecting radical Muslims. 

Just yesterday, left-wing news blog Raw Story ran a story that asked why Fox News was obsessed with Islamic terrorist attacks. What perfect timing! Blogger Eric W. Dolan attacked Fox for blaming a beheading that occurred in September on Islamic terrorism.