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By Tim Graham | October 2, 2014 | 10:22 PM EDT

President Obama tried desperately to talk up the economy in a speech at Northwestern University on Thursday, but he still ended up denouncing his own term in office. “When nearly all the gains of the recovery have gone to the top 1 percent, I find that a little hard to swallow," he said. Doesn’t that reflect on him?

Obama made a petulant attack on Fox News for presenting Obamacare as a “fanged threat to freedom,” and then he claimed it “working pretty well in the real world.”

By Jack Coleman | October 2, 2014 | 9:30 PM EDT

Well, it's official -- outspoken opposition to the commander in chief during wartime is no longer the supreme expression of patriotism. Even though this was all the rage a decade ago, while an earlier conflict raged in Iraq and a Republican named Bush was at the helm, anyone engaging in it today will face accusations of treason.

With the midterm elections only weeks away, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow is doing all she can for Democratic candidates, namely by smearing their opponents.
 

By Matthew Balan | October 2, 2014 | 6:36 PM EDT

Wednesday's CNN Tonight spotlighted the lawsuit of a homosexual woman, who mistakenly received sperm from an African-American man – instead of a "blond-haired, blue-eyed [man]...resembling my partner," as guest Jennifer Cramblett put it. Hosts Don Lemon and Alisyn Camerota gave Cramblett a platform to promote her case. Camerota underlined that the plaintiff "live[s] in eastern Ohio, in a town that you say is 98 percent white and racially insensitive." However, Lemon actually played a bit of hardball with Cramblett, over whether the racial make-up of her daughter really matters or not.

By Curtis Houck | October 2, 2014 | 6:29 PM EDT

NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams conducted a question and answer session on Facebook following Wednesday night’s program and defended his over 4-minute-long interview with actor and activist Ben Affleck that aired on Tuesday night after a woman asked him why such an interview would air “promoting his new movie on a hard news show.”

Williams responded by equating his show to a newspaper in that “newspapers have sections, and life’s too short.” He said that he “could EASILY [emphasis his] fill the entire 30 minute slot with nothing but hard news, especially in our post 9-11 era. But there’s variety to life.”

By Scott Whitlock | October 2, 2014 | 6:17 PM EDT

Liberal MSNBC anchor Ed Schultz could barely contain himself on Thursday as he gushed over Germany's "socialism." The country officially scrapped tuition fees and this sent Schultz into a fit of envy: " We need to take a page out of the country Germany. Here's some good socialism for you!"

By Scott Whitlock | October 2, 2014 | 3:51 PM EDT

Piers Morgan, who was forced out at CNN due to low ratings, gave an interview to Politico where he lashed out at his former colleague, Anderson Cooper. The journalist also discussed plans for a new documentary pushing gun control. Regarding Cooper, Morgan complained, "Could I have done with a better lead-in? Yes...Anderson is a great field reporter, but does he drive big ratings at CNN, outside of a big news cycle? I don’t see any evidence of it." 

By Joseph Rossell | October 2, 2014 | 3:51 PM EDT

In spite of revelations in recent months the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) mishandled strains of deadly bird flu, anthrax and botulism, the broadcast networks remained confident the government’s “disease detectives” could handle the Ebola outbreak.

On Sept. 30, the CDC announced that a patient in Texas was the first instance of Ebola in the U.S. But from the very beginning of the Ebola outbreak in March 2014, networks’ evening news programs have demonstrated their resounding faith in the capability of the CDC by ignoring agency failures in 98 percent of stories on Ebola (53 of 54).

By Kyle Drennen | October 2, 2014 | 2:52 PM EDT

Appearing on MSNBC's Jose Diaz-Balart on Thursday, former talk show host and retired Marine Montel Williams scolded the Obama administration for not taking action to free Marine Sergeant Andrew Tahmooressi, held in a Mexican prison for six months on a trumped up weapons charge: "...what I found out was extremely disturbing....Jill Tahmooressi has had a son in prison for six months who is ill. No one from the White House has reached out to her to say, 'We're going to do something.' The State Department hasn't even called her directly to say, 'We're going to do something.'"

Williams, who testified on behalf of Tahmooressi at a congressional hearing on Wednesday, pointed out the President's hypocrisy on the issue: "Remember, when [Sergeant Bowe] Bergdahl was let out, the President said he did so because he was in imminent risk of medical danger. Sergeant Tahmooressi's in the same position. The President should do the same thing. And not trade anybody, just make the call to the president of Mexico." [Listen to the audio]

By Bill Donohue | October 2, 2014 | 2:05 PM EDT

The New York Times has a story today about the Diocese of Harrisburg's decision to ban high school boys from competing against girls in school wrestling. This is the second day in a row that the Times has covered this story, and there is nothing new of any substance in today's piece.
 
Today's news story on the Pennsylvania Catholic high school wrestling policy merited 978 words. By contrast, today's New York Times ran a story on Oslo withdrawing from a bid to host the 2022 winter Olympics that totaled 406 words. A story on Derek Jeter starting his own web forum was a mere 599 words.

By Katie Yoder | October 2, 2014 | 1:30 PM EDT

Given the media’s recent fascination with rallies, let’s see how they (don’t) cover this one. 

On Sunday, Oct. 5, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee and Concerned Women for America CEO and President Penny Nance will host a “Stand with Israel Rally” in Washington D.C. In support of the Jewish State, the event will feature national speakers to “encourage sound defense of Israel" and decry "the threat of radical Islam."

By Matthew Balan | October 2, 2014 | 12:44 PM EDT

Brian Palmer revealed what many secularists feel about Christian missionaries in Africa in a Thursday piece on Slate, especially the role on the front lines of the ongoing fight against Ebola. Palmer acknowledged how "missionary doctors and nurses...have undertaken long-term commitments to address the health problems of poor Africans," but added that "for secular Americans...it may be difficult to shake a bit of discomfort with the situation....It's great that these people are doing God's work, but do they have to talk about Him so much?"

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 2, 2014 | 12:38 PM EDT

Kasie Hunt, MSNBC’s Political Correspondent, appeared on Thursday’s Morning Joe to promote her recent trip to Colorado, where she covered the highly contentious Senate contest between incumbent Democrat Mark Udall and his Republican challenger Congressman Cory Gardner. Hunt began her prepackaged report by playing up how “Washington Republicans were thrilled when Gardner decided to ran against Udall. His easy manner and moderate tone seemed like a good match for Colorado. It’s a purple state that rejected more inflammatory conservatives in 2010.” 

By Scott Whitlock | October 2, 2014 | 12:14 PM EDT

Why would PBS devote over six minutes to a midterm election race that looks to be headed towards a blowout? Perhaps it's because examining the Mississippi Senate race on the PBS NewsHour allows the network to dig into the bitter primary battle between Tea Party-backed Chris McDaniel and the victor, incumbent Thad Cochran. 

By P.J. Gladnick | October 2, 2014 | 10:53 AM EDT

New York magazine published an article dripping with condescension on how to psychologically fool conservatives into becoming believers in global warming. Its all a matter of using the correct "framing interventions" which, if done correctly, might perform the trick.
 

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 2, 2014 | 10:27 AM EDT

Following a Wednesday morning report in which the hosts of CBS This Morning celebrated California’s ban on plastic bags, on Thursday morning the hosts promoted a Seattle law that fines citizens for failing to compost properly. While co-host Norah O’Donnell skeptically argued that “garbage trucks may start to feel more like police cars” reporter Ben Tracy began his report by suggesting the fine for not composting didn’t go far enough and wondered “if you're really trying to incentivize people to do this, why is the fine only a buck?”