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By Clay Waters | October 20, 2014 | 11:33 AM EDT

The New York Times is one of the media's prime carriers of sickly White House assurances about Ebola, dictating unfounded claims that it has the disease under control, while dismissing calls from Republicans and health experts for banning flights out of infected countries as paranoid, unscientific overreaction.

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 20, 2014 | 11:13 AM EDT

Andrea Mitchell, NBC News Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent, appeared on Sunday’s Meet the Press and did her best to make excuses for potential Democratic losses in the November midterm elections. Speaking to moderator Chuck Todd, Mitchell complained that the “Texas Supreme Court decision on Saturday morning is going to be really telling, if there are more voter restrictions placed in some of those states, it's going to be really hard for Democrats.” 

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 20, 2014 | 9:53 AM EDT

On Sunday’s Nightly News, Kristen Welker, NBC News White House Correspondent, scolded the GOP over their criticism of the Obama administration’s handling of the Ebola crisis. The NBC reporter maintained that “with public fears spreading faster than the disease itself, some Republican candidates eyeing wins in the upcoming midterm elections are stoking public fears.”

By Mark Finkelstein | October 20, 2014 | 9:48 AM EDT

Tart-tongued Tina Brown is at it again. On today's Morning Joe, seeking to explain why Republicans are doing surprisingly well with women voters this year, Brown said: "they had their rabies shots."

By Rich Noyes | October 20, 2014 | 8:40 AM EDT

With the first confirmed cases of Ebola in America, CNN's Van Jones urges Democrats to exploit the issue: "We've got to get our base going....This Ebola thing is the best argument you can make for the kind of government that we believe in." But when Republicans criticize the Obama administration's response, journalists sneer. "This is the politics of fear. It's irresponsible," chastised MSNBC's Craig Melvin.

By Mark Finkelstein | October 20, 2014 | 8:28 AM EDT

Don't know what Dorian Warren's been smoking, but we can guess what he's been reading: Rolling Stone, and in particular a recent column in which Paul Krugman claims that Barack Obama is one of the most "successful presidents in American history" [ed.: not a typo].

On today's Morning Joe, MSNBC contributor Warren said he'd be happy to call his Vegas buddies to bet that "history will be very, very good to Barack Obama."   Warren was responding to Joe Scarborough's suggestion that history will lump Obama and George W. Bush together for their lack of effective leadership.

By Tom Johnson | October 20, 2014 | 12:01 AM EDT

A blogger says it seems that people “genuinely don't care what happens to this country or, for that matter, their own world anymore” and, therefore, vote for Republicans.

By Tom Blumer | October 19, 2014 | 11:16 PM EDT

To the relief of sex offenders throughout the state, Arizona Democratic gubernatorial candidate Fred DuVal, during a Tuesday forum at Redemption Church in Gilbert, said that, in the words of an unbylined Washington Free Beacon story, "he is opposed to mandating parental consent for a girl as young as 14 years old to get an abortion."

This is a non-story in the establishment press, which made it a mission to take out two GOP U.S. Senate candidates two years ago over abortion-related remarks with far less real-world impact. Based on a search on "DuVal parental consent" (not in quotes) at the Arizona Republic, the paper hasn't done a story specifically noting DuVal's outrageous position — even though it did manage to notice that DuVal, like Ed FitzGerald, the Democrat who is running for Governor in Ohio, has been known to drive without a valid driver's license, though far less often or brazenly.

By Tom Blumer | October 19, 2014 | 8:01 PM EDT

One would think, based on comparing dispatches from Reuters and the Associated Press, that President Barack Obama must have spoken at two different events in Upper Marlboro, Maryland today.

The two dispatches are so radically different in tone and content that they it doesn't seem possible that they both could be from the same event. But they are. Jeff Mason at Reuters (saved here for future reference and fair use purposes) observed "early departures of crowd members while he spoke underscored his continuing unpopularity." But at AP (saved here) Josh Lederman (pictured at left) described "a rowdy crowd of about 8,000 people" attending "a rally that had the feeling of a gospel service." A more detailed comparison follows the jump:

By P.J. Gladnick | October 19, 2014 | 7:10 PM EDT

Candy Crowley on what Rush Limbaugh would label the state run CNN show of State of the Union seemed to place her blind trust in the assurances of state affiliated medical personnel that a travel ban on the Ebola Hot Zone nations of West Africa was both unnecessary as well as harmful. It took guest  Senator Ted Cruz to make it clear to Crowley just why such a ban was absolutely necessary.

Bonus zinger!

By NB Staff | October 19, 2014 | 7:03 PM EDT

MRC president Brent Bozell appeared on "Cavuto" on the Fox Business Channel Friday night to discuss Ebola coverage. Substitute host Connell McShane asked if the media were either overdoing it or underdoing it.

Bozell said it was too early to render a verdict. If the disease never takes hold, then it might look like hype. But if the disease worsens, then all the attention is justified.

By Tim Graham | October 19, 2014 | 5:49 PM EDT

The Drudge Report noticed the New York Times suggested a new leftist documentary honoring Edward Snowden “Tests Hollywood Obama Backers,” as in Harvey Weinstein, who often promotes his films by taking them into the Obama White House for a screening. Probably not this time! Michael Cieply reported in the Times:

“As I saw the promise of the Obama administration betrayed, and walked away from,” says Mr. Snowden, referring to drone strikes and invasive monitoring by the National Security Agency, “it really hardened me to action.”

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 19, 2014 | 1:47 PM EDT

NBC’s Chuck Todd, who on Friday declared that he was “stubbornly neutral”, predictably peddled liberal talking points on Ebola by blaming the National Rifle Association for the country not having a Surgeon General. Speaking to Senators Roy Blunt (R-MO) and Bob Casey (D-PA) on Sunday, the Meet the Press moderator insisted that “this seems to be politics. The NRA said they were going to score the vote, and suddenly everybody’s frozen. That seems a little petty in hindsight, does it not?” 

By Tom Blumer | October 19, 2014 | 12:27 PM EDT

The White House is apparently feeling pretty full of itself over the fiscal 2014 federal budget result it has just reported.

Reacting to the news that this year's deficit was "only" $483.4 billion, White House budget director Shaun Donovan crowed that "This is a return to fiscal normalcy." The press, of course including Andrew Taylor at the Associated Press, has accepted all of this with little challenge, including the administration's misleading "percentage of GDP" assertions, which completely ignore how much more the national debt has grown than the reported budget deficits. Taylor went one step further, blatanty deceiving readers as to how much money the federal government borrows for every dollar it spends.

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 19, 2014 | 12:13 PM EDT

On Sunday, October 19, a panel on ABC’s This Week engaged in a highly contentious debate over the Obama administration’s handing of the Ebola crisis. Conservative Mary Matalin mocked PBS host Tavis Smiley for criticizing those who are calling for a travel ban on Ebola stricken nations. The former George W. Bush official argued that “the African leaders who have contained to five countries have done it on the basis of containment. Our CDC now stands for cannot do containment. The reason the president gets blamed for everything, Tavis, because he's responsible for it.”