I can't quite put my finger on it...

Democrat senator Vince Fumo has <a href="http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/states/pennsylvania/127279... forward</a> trying to keep the Philly Inquirer from firing the staff who are slated to go. Columnist John Baer just <a href="http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/news/local/12769071.htm">can't figure out why</a>. <blockquote>IT STRIKES me as odd. I mean Vince Fumo, the Prince of Philadelphia, a fixture of power and influence, reportedly under investigation for stuff involving a non-profit group, doggedly pursued by the Inky for what seems years, stepping forward to save 100 jobs at that same Inky and this Daily News. Since when, I wonder, does a politician, especially one in a newspaper's crosshairs, seek to help newspapers? Strange, no?</blockquote><p>Gee, why would a Democrat want a typical urban American newspaper to stay just as it is? I can't figure it out either. Hold on, hold on, I think I have it. </p><p>It might have something to do with the fact that even though said Democrat is under investigation for &quot;stuff&quot; involving a non-profit group, the newspaper in question still opens the piece with &quot;the Prince of Philadelphia, a fixture of power and influence&quot;, no? Or maybe he just likes a newspaper that refers to Democrats' illegal activity as &quot;stuff&quot; rather than defining the actual crimes he allegedly committed. </p><p>I can't help but notice they <a href="http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/12767490.htm">didn't define</a> what Tom Delay did as &quot;stuff&quot;: &quot;</p><blockquote><strong>The grand jury said</strong> that during DeLay's push to create more Republican-dominated congressional districts in Texas, <strong>his political action committee funneled $190,000 from corporations to state House candidates</strong> through an arm of the Republican National Committee.&quot;</blockquote>Wow, a grand jury said he actually committed the crime? That's interesting since most grand juries only find that enough evidence exists to warrant an actual indictment. <br /><br /><blockquote><a href="http://www.constitution.org/jury/jurymess.htm">Constitution.org</a>: A grand jury does not decide guilt. It investigates the facts in a case and recommends a course of action.</blockquote>