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By Tom Blumer | September 11, 2014 | 1:38 PM EDT

A new Gallup poll reports that Americans trust the federal government less than they ever have. Given that President Obama has increasingly insisted on acting on his own, it's not unreasonable to infer that this result means, consistent with other polling the press has stubbornly ignored — documented in a new Media Research Center study — that they also trust his leadership less than they ever have.

Gallup's main headline dressed up the results up by focusing on only half of what it found: "Trust in Federal Gov't on International Issues at New Low." But the subheadline says, "Americans' trust in government handling of domestic problems also at record low." Okay, guys. What problems aren't either domestic, international, or a combination of both? So trust in the federal government to handle any problems is at an all-time low. How tough is it to say that?

By Tim Graham | September 11, 2014 | 1:13 PM EDT

In today’s Biased Headlines department, see today’s Reid Wilson report on the Washington Post website from Wednesday: “Nevada is about to pass the biggest corporate tax giveaway in its history.”

But has the Post recently described welfare programs or food stamps as a "giveaway"? It doesn't look like it.

By Scott Whitlock | September 11, 2014 | 12:43 PM EDT

All three network morning shows on Thursday highlighted Barack Obama's primetime speech from the night before, promoting his talk of a "broad coalition." Yet, Germany and Britain have announced that they won't take part in the President's planned air strikes. In 2003, ABC, NBC and CBS hit George W. Bush for "going it alone" with a coalition of 18 countries. 

By Tom Blumer | September 11, 2014 | 10:55 AM EDT

As the midnight oil-burning Curtis Houck at NewsBusters noted last night, John McCain ripped into Jay Carney's attempts to rewrite history Wednesday evening on CNN. Among other things, he reminded the former White House Press Secretary that "We had it (the Iraq War) won, thanks to the surge." In other words, our military and Iraqi government had achieved victory. Barack Obama and his administration, perhaps until last night, have seemed indifferent at best and dismissive at worst at what has happened in Iraq since then.

After McCain got in his rips, it was Newt Gingrich's turn. The former House Speaker, whose assertion, as will be seen later, is supported by contemporaneous reporting by Tim Arango at the New York Times, took apart Carney's hypocrisy in whining about how a status of forces agreement with Iraq with the number of American troops our generals believed would be necessary to maintain the peace would have meant our presence there "in perpetuity":

By Mark Finkelstein | September 11, 2014 | 8:38 AM EDT

President Obama is a great leader.  Really.  Just ask him. Seemingly ignored in the coverage of the president's ISIS speech last night was the moment when President Obama claimed that the ISIS threat was being met with "strength and resolve," then boasted that his strategy—and by extension he himself—represented "American leadership at its best."

Can anyone imagine truly great American leaders--from Washington to Lincoln to Reagan--feeling the need to claim that their plans represented "American leadership at its best?"

By Matthew Philbin and Katie Yoder | September 11, 2014 | 8:14 AM EDT

Qatar-owned network avoided Hamas ‘terror,’ Israeli casualties.

By Curtis Houck | September 11, 2014 | 7:07 AM EDT

After President Obama’s speech to the nation on Wednesday night, MSNBC host Rachel Maddow asked NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel what he thought of President Obama’s analogy that the U.S. strategy in fighting terrorism in Yemen and Somalia would carry over to dealing with the Islamic terrorist group ISIS in both Iraq and Syria. Needless to say, Engel was not at all pleased with the comparison the President made, telling Maddow immediately that “I think it is wildly off base, frankly” and “[i]t's an oversimplification of the problem.”

By Randy Hall | September 11, 2014 | 7:06 AM EDT

Disappointed on the far left, Michael Moore tells Obama, "When the history is written of this era, this is how you’ll be remembered: “He was the first black president.…Eight years of your life, and that’s what people are going to remember....That's it."

By Curtis Houck | September 11, 2014 | 2:28 AM EDT

After President Obama’s speech to the nation on Wednesday night, CNN brought on its newly-minted senior political commenator and former Obama White House press secretary Jay Carney and Republican Senator John McCain (Ariz.) to comment on what the President’s speech regarding U.S policy in dealing withy the Islamic terrorist group ISIS. However, the next eight minutes instantly evolved into a heated debate between the two over the President’s actions of withdrawing troops from Iraq early in his administration and whether that allowed a threat like ISIS to proliferate.

By Curtis Houck | September 10, 2014 | 11:27 PM EDT

After President Obama’s speech on confronting the Islamic terrorist group ISIS on Wednesday night, each of the major broadcast networks offered some brief analysis before returning to regularly scheduled programming. Over on CBS, Face the Nation host Bob Schieffer anchored that network’s coverage and had nothing but good things to say in the few minutes before CBS’s coverage concluded.

Schieffer told the audience that Obama’s speech “shows us a real evolution in where the President was just in the last week of August” when he told reporters at a press conference that “we don’t have a strategy yet” in how to deal with ISIS and particularly in Syria.

By Ken Shepherd | September 10, 2014 | 11:00 PM EDT

As an MSNBC panel discussed congressional reticence with President Obama's strategy pertaining to ISIS, the Rev. Al Sharpton jumped in with a challenge to John Boehner (R-Ohio) and Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to call floor votes on congressional authorization for action against the terror group. 

By Tom Blumer | September 10, 2014 | 10:49 PM EDT

In quite remarkable testimony on the day before the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 Islamist terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, the Washington Free Beacon's Adam Kredo reported today that "Francis Taylor, under secretary for intelligence and analysis at DHS, told senators during a hearing that ISIL supporters are known to be plotting ways to infiltrate the United States through the (nation's southern) border."

Predictably, Taylor's statements are getting very little other press attention.

By Clay Waters | September 10, 2014 | 9:43 PM EDT

In the heated run-up to the September 18 independence vote in Scotland, where Scots will vote on whether to separate from the United Kingdom after 307 years, the New York Times has planted its flag on the liberal, pro-independence side in its coverage, with jabs at the ruling Conservative Party and some old-fashioned Margaret Thatcher-bashing thrown in.

By Connor Williams | September 10, 2014 | 9:00 PM EDT

Muslim author and religious “scholar” Reza Aslan has developed quite the reputation for making inflammatory statements about Christianity. This time, in an interview with HuffPost Live, Aslan claimed in no uncertain terms that Jesus Christ was a Marxist.

By Ken Shepherd | September 10, 2014 | 8:50 PM EDT

In the midst of his sit-down chat with MSNBC's Chris Matthews, comedian Bill Maher blasted Republicans for hyping the threat of ISIS, which he insists is not that big a deal for Americans on American soil. "I am much more afraid of ice, as in melting, than I am about ISIS."