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By Tom Blumer | November 18, 2014 | 11:41 PM EST

There were several more of those infamous "U-word" ("unexpectedly") sightings yesterday in the business press, as Japan — to the surprise of no one who has successfully avoided the Keynesian koolaid — reported that its economy shrank for the second quarter in a row, officially falling into yet another recession.

The U-word hit the trifecta, appearing in reports at the Associated Press, Bloomberg and Reuters.

By Brent Bozell and Tim Graham | November 18, 2014 | 10:49 PM EST

After the 2012 campaign, liberal journalists swarmed around Republican Party chair Reince Priebus offering what was called an “autopsy” on every way Republicans failed, with a special emphasis on more outreach to minority voters. Democrats and their media enablers painted a picture of demographic doom for an aging white Republican base.

Two years later, Republicans made dramatic gains among minority voters. In House races across America, Republicans won 50 percent of the Asian vote to 49 percent for Democrats. Republicans won 38 percent of the Hispanic vote in House races. Gov. Sam Brownback drew 47 percent of Hispanics in Kansas, and Gov-elect Greg Abbott pulled in 44 percent of Hispanics in Texas.

By Ken Shepherd | November 18, 2014 | 8:58 PM EST

Earlier today in a press conference, Speaker of the House John Boehner made a quip about President Obama's veto threat of a bill to authorize the Keystone XL oil pipeline which indirectly referenced Jonathan Gruber's infamous "stupidity of the American voter" line regarding the selling of ObamaCare. 

Hardball host Chris Matthews played the clip on his November 18 program, but seemed completely oblivious as to its meaning, instead using the remark as an opportunity to demand Keystone supporter Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.) to denounce Boehner's supposed ad hominem attack on environmentalists who oppose building the pipeline.

By Jack Coleman | November 18, 2014 | 8:49 PM EST

Thank you, Rush Limbaugh, for answering a persistent question about the deceitfully-named Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare -- where have I seen this before?

Turns out something similar was pulled off in a major Hollywood film from the early '70s, Limbaugh pointed out to his radio listeners yesterday.

By Tom Blumer | November 18, 2014 | 8:25 PM EST

As I noted yesterday, the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, finally broke down on Friday and mentioned the name "Jonathan Gruber" in a news story — a Friday afternoon item which, among other things, dishonestly attempted to distance the Affordable Care Act advisor from his long acknowledged and celebrated (until recently) "architect" role.

As of early this evening, the only other AP mention of Gruber has come in an unbylined Sunday morning story on President Barack Obama's insistence that, in AP's words, "the American public was not misled about certain provisions of his health care law," and that, again in AP's words, "there was no provision of the health care law that was not extensively debated and was not fully transparent." The terse, "Now will you people please go away?" five-paragraph report follows the jump:

By Curtis Houck | November 18, 2014 | 8:15 PM EST

On Tuesday night, NBC Nightly News continued its streak of ignoring comments made by ObamaCare architect Jonathan Gruber into an 11th day while ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir finally brought up Gruber’s comments on the “stupidity of the American voter” and the "advantage" of having a “lack of transparency” in getting ObamaCare passed.

Anchor David Muir discussed the story for one minute and 16 seconds with ABC News chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl and described the situation as a “controversy” and labeled Gruber as “one of the architects of ObamaCare” two days after President Obama brushed off Gruber as merely “some adviser who never worked on our staff.”

By Kristine Marsh | November 18, 2014 | 6:55 PM EST

While many attention-seeking celebrities would agree with the statement, “bad press is still press,” professional golfer Tiger Woods apparently does not. And he has good reason. A recent article in Golf Digest, which included photos of an actor posing as the golfer and a fake interview with the fictional golfer, was “really more like a grudge-fueled piece of character assassination,” according to Woods.

He called the ethics and integrity of Golf Digest into question with his response just published on Derek Jeter’s website, “The Players’ Tribune,” Nov. 18.

By Ken Shepherd | November 18, 2014 | 5:36 PM EST

MSNBC is no stranger to guest panelists from the New York Times, but don't expect Times writer Russ Buettner to appear on the network's air anytime soon as Mr. Buettner gave readers of the November 18 paper a look at how "Questions About [Rev. Al] Sharpton’s Finances Accompany His Rise in Influence."

By Melissa Mullins | November 18, 2014 | 5:04 PM EST

Appearing on "The O'Reilly Factor," Comedy Central star Jon Stewart said Democrats lost the midterms "Because they curled up in a little ball and tried to make sure that nobody hit them too hard...I don’t even know what they ran on....Right? Here’s what they ran on: ‘We don’t like Obama either. I don’t know who voted for him. We’ve got nothing to do with the guy.’”

But Stewart still claimed Obama isn't really the leader of the Democrats. He's only the president.

By Joseph Rossell | November 18, 2014 | 4:47 PM EST

First it was just conservatives who were accused of doing the bidding of the Koch brothers. Now a radical climate change alarmist is accusing Senate Democrats of “trying to build them [the Koch brothers] a pet project,” the Keystone XL pipeline.

Erich Pica, President of Friends of the Earth, ranted against Democrats and Republicans alike in a Huffington Post op-ed on November 17, 2014. According to Pica, Democrats need to take “the just, responsible and moral stance” against fossil fuels and to stop being “more concerned with politics than the planet.” Besides environmental activism, Friends of the Earth takes a stance against free market capitalism.

By Kristine Marsh | November 18, 2014 | 4:10 PM EST

Question: if there’s no such thing as a slut, how can anyone be guilty of “slut-shaming?” 

Don’t dismiss it as one of those timeless philosophical conundrums (ie. “Which came first, the slut or the shamer?”). The answer is an important key to navigating the shoals of perpetual feminist outrage.

By Matthew Balan | November 18, 2014 | 4:02 PM EST

On Monday's AC360 on CNN, retired Lt. General Russel Honore rebuked the media's coverage of the ongoing controversy surrounding the police shooting of Michael Brown. Anderson Cooper raised how a liberal legal analyst contended that Missouri Governor Jay Nixon's activation of the National Guard, in anticipation of a grand jury decision on the case, was an "escalation of this military-style approach that didn't work in the first place." He then asked, "Do you agree with that – that it could, in some ways, do more harm than – than good?"

By Jorge Bonilla | November 18, 2014 | 3:51 PM EST

When asked about the ramifications of potential executive action on immigration, incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) suggested such action by President Barack Obama would "poison the well". McConnell need no longer concern himself with that eventuality, given a recent tweet by Univision's Jorge Ramos.

By Katie Yoder | November 18, 2014 | 3:50 PM EST

If you asked a scientist to create a test-tube liberal, chances are his product couldn’t hold a candle to Maria Luisa Tucker. Tucker, a new mother, is celebrating the arrival of her little bundle of joy by mooning over the “environmental impact of procreation.” Really.

For a Nov. 13 piece for Alternet, Tucker asked, “Does Having a Child Make Me an Environmental Villain?” In it, Tucker outlined her “main source” of “maternal guilt:” “the mere fact that I created a person.” “Specifically,” she wrote, “an American person who will inevitably leave a large carbon footprint.”

By Kyle Drennen | November 18, 2014 | 3:36 PM EST

In a Tuesday article, Baltimore Sun media critic David Zurawik examined the reason behind Fox News beating every other TV news outlet in the ratings – including NBC, ABC and CBS – during November 4 midterm election coverage: "...it's time to think seriously about what that says about Fox, CNN, MSNBC, the state of network news today and the role TV plays or doesn't play in providing us with reliable, trustworthy information."