CBS Trumpets Caroline Kennedy as 'Representative of The Best In American Culture'

CBS again paid homage to Caroline Kennedy on Tuesday's CBS This Morning as they hyped her possible nomination to be the next ambassador of Japan. During her report, Jan Crawford featured liberal historian Robert Dallek, who gushed over the apparent worldwide reputation of the presidential daughter's family: "The Kennedys, generally, have an extraordinary, continuing hold on the public's imagination, both in this country and abroad."

Dallek later asserted that the U.S. might be "sending somebody as ambassador to Tokyo who is representative of the best in American culture." The correspondent also touted how Kennedy "would have an opportunity to test her political skills, but also, she would be able to put the Kennedy name back on an international stage" if President Obama named her to the key diplomatic post.

Jan Crawford, CBS News Correspondent; Screen Cap From 2 April 2013 Edition of CBS This Morning | NewsBusters.orgCrawford wasted little time before playing a clip of the daughter of JFK endorsing then-candidate Obama at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. She then outlined Kennedy's close association with the chief executive over the past several years, pointing out that "she has been among President Obama's biggest supporters."

The journalist then played two clips from the CBS morning show's fawning interview of the liberal personality on March 8, 2013, including anchor Gayle King's beyond softball question about the possible nomination: "There are rumors about you. Shall we say, as Charlie [Rose] said earlier, Madame Ambassador?" She also claimed that "in the 50 years since the death of her father, President John F. Kennedy, Americans have wondered whether and when one of his children would follow a political path."

Crawford played her soundbites from Dallek near the end of the segment. The liberal historian had previously sang the Kennedys' praises back on the September 19, 2012 edition of CBS This Morning. Correspondent Bill Plante turned to Dallek about decades-old pictures of JFK and Jackie Kennedy. He gushed that the pictures have "have a sort of Hollywood quality...a sense that these are celebrities." Dallek later singled out then-Senator Kennedy: "It was not just that he was handsome, but there was a kind of aura – a kind of charisma to the man that allowed him to capture the public imagination."

The full transcript of Jan Crawford's report from Tuesday's CBS This Morning:

CHARLIE ROSE: There is still no official announcement, but numerous reports suggest Caroline Kennedy will become our next ambassador to Japan.

Jan Crawford is in Washington. Jan, good morning.

JAN CRAWFORD: Good morning, Charlie; good morning, Norah. You know, Caroline Kennedy has long represented her family's legacy, but without ever holding any elected office. So, as America's ambassador to Japan, she would have an opportunity to test her political skills, but also, she would be able to put the Kennedy name back on an international stage.

[CBS News Graphic: "Madame Ambassador? Caroline Kennedy May Be Next Envoy To Japan"]

CAROLINE KENNEDY, PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY'S DAUGHTER (from August 25, 2008 at the Democratic National Convention): I have never had someone inspire me the way people tell me my father inspired them, but I do now: Barack Obama. (audience cheers and applauds)

CORDES (voice-over): Political appointments are often reserved for the President's closest allies, and since stepping into the spotlight in the 2008 campaign, Caroline Kennedy has been among President Obama's biggest supporters. Four years later, she was co-chair for Obama's reelection campaign.

JAY CARNEY, WHITE HOUSE PRESS SECRETARY (from press briefing): I have no personnel announcements to make.

CORDES: The White House on Monday would not confirm the appointment.

GAYLE KING (from March 8, 2013 edition of "CBS This Morning"): There are rumors about you. Shall we say, as Charlie [Rose] said earlier, Madame Ambassador?


CORDES: And Kennedy avoided the question in March during an appearance on 'CBS This Morning'.

KENNEDY: I'd love to serve in any way.

CRAWFORD: But the writing seems to be on the wall.

NORAH O'DONNELL (off-camera): And look what she wrote! 'Come to Tokyo! Caroline Kennedy' (Rose laughs).

PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY (from file footage): Oh, there's Caroline-

CORDES: In the 50 years since the death of her father, President John F. Kennedy, Americans have wondered whether and when one of his children would follow a political path.

ROBERT DALLEK, PRESIDENTIAL HISTORIAN: The Kennedys, generally, have an extraordinary, continuing hold on the public's imagination, both in this country and abroad.

CORDES: Historian Robert Dallek says President Obama's decision to send a Kennedy to Japan would convey a strong message to the region.

DALLEK: We're sending somebody as ambassador to Tokyo who is representative of the best in American culture.

CORDES (on-camera): Now, a presidential appointment requires no election – just a Senate confirmation. And if confirmed, Caroline Kennedy would become the first woman to be ambassador to Japan. Charlie and Norah?

ROSE: Jan, thank you very much.

Matthew Balan
Matthew Balan
Matthew Balan is a news analyst at Media Research Center