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By Tom Blumer | December 18, 2014 | 2:03 PM EST

Those who rail at Fox News for allegedly being a haven of unbridled, uninterrupted conservatism usually and conveniently fail to remember that Shepard Smith is there.

Smith's take yesterday on the potential pitfalls of a thaw in U.S.-Cuba relations, particularly on the commercial front, was nothing short of astonishing. His primary fear, expressed in an interview with Gerri Willis of the Fox Business Network, is that the new arrangements might "ruin the place." It would be "the last thing they need" to see "Taco Bell and Lowes" locations there. Smith also posed as a market analyst, wondering if the Dow was up 300 points because of President Obama's related announcement. Video (HT Mediaite) and a transcript follow the jump:

By Connor Williams | December 18, 2014 | 1:47 PM EST

In case you missed it, censorship of ideas that do not adhere to liberal orthodoxy is happening at the University of Michigan. The PC police have struck once again. A Muslim student, Omar Mahmood, wrote a satirical piece titled "Do the Left Thing" for the conservative Michigan Review mocking social justice fads like trigger warnings and micro-aggressions, but also political correctness in general. The result? A firing and a vandalized apartment.

By Jack Coleman | December 18, 2014 | 12:36 PM EST

When Senator Elizabeth Warren makes it official that she's running for president, she ought to hit up late night talk show host Seth Meyers for a campaign contribution. Better yet, his checkbook.

While chatting with Fox News's Bill O'Reilly last night, Meyers joked (or did he?) that he's more comfortable with Warren deciding what to do with his money than he is.

By Gerardo Abascal | December 18, 2014 | 11:42 AM EST

This past Nov. 28, legendary Mexican comedian Roberto Gómez Bolaños, creator and protagonist of several television comedy series enjoyed for decades throughout the Spanish-speaking world, died at age 85. 

As to be expected, Univision, the leading Spanish-language television network in the United States, featured the news of Gómez Bolaños, better known as “Chespirito”, prominently as the lead story of its flagship newscast that day. But Chespirito’s passing wasn’t only the lead story on Nov. 28. It was the ONLY story during the entire Noticiero Univision broadcast, not only on the day of his passing, but on Nov. 29 and Nov. 30 as well. 

By Scott Whitlock | December 18, 2014 | 11:38 AM EST

The journalists of Good Morning America on Thursday cheered Barack Obama's efforts to "help thaw a Cold War" and offered little in the way of criticism for the President's actions to normalize relations with Cuba. Reporter Jim Avila hyped, "Well soon many more Americans will be able to hop a plane to Havana, take a tour, even legally buy one of those famous cigars."

By Jeffrey Meyer | December 18, 2014 | 11:23 AM EST

On Thursday, CBS This Morning interviewed Colin Powell, former Secretary of State and supporter of President Obama, to discuss whether or not the president made the right call in normalizing relations between the United States and Cuba. Despite Powell being an open supporter of Obama, CBS ignored his close ties to the president. Instead, co-host Charlie Rose introduced him by noting how “President George W. Bush supported the economic embargo on Cuba, so did the Secretary of State during his first term, Colin Powell. The retired Army General is with us from Washington.” 

By Katie Yoder | December 18, 2014 | 8:55 AM EST

It’s the reason for the season, so naturally, attacks on Christianity tend to pick up around this time of year. The mocking and sacrilege gets a bit more pointed in the media. The sneering contempt from entertainers and lefty activists gets a bit thicker. 

But insulting Christians is a year-round sport, like bowling. Unlike bowling, you’ll find all the best people doing it, from the New Yorker to Comedy Central, from CNN to Hollywood. Whether it’s a “beef baby Jesus,” “climate-change Christmas carols” or simply slandering core beliefs as “bigotry,” media liberals haven’t held back when it comes to Christians this year. 

 

By Mark Finkelstein | December 18, 2014 | 8:52 AM EST

It's good that we live in a country where citizens feel free to criticize elected officials to their face.  Just wondering, though: when was the last time that freedom was exercised on MSNBC to tell a Dem official that something he said was "inane?"

On today's Morning Joe, Donny Deutsch angrily asked Republican Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart of Miami "why do you say an inane thing like that?" Deutsch's diss came in the context of a heated exchange in which Diaz-Balart told Donny that his notion that the Cuba deal was "liberating" for the Cuban people was "naive" and that Deutsch was living "in la-la land."  Deutsch later retaliated, calling Diaz-Balart naive.

By Tim Graham | December 18, 2014 | 7:36 AM EST

Liberals are going into deep mourning over the television death of Stephen Colbert, Very Badly Disguised Liberal. They think this is an "unparalleled achievement." In Wednesday's paper, TV writer Bill Carter of The New York Times lined up all of Colbert’s competitors to call him a genius for disparaging conservatives with so much panache.

“For nine years, Stephen Colbert has relentlessly maintained his pompous, deeply ridiculous but consistently appealing conservative blowhard character he has left an indelible mark on late-night television comedy,” Carter wrote. “Consistently appealing?” To whom? Liberals presume “why, everybody enjoys mocking conservatives as opposed to reading.”

By Curtis Houck | December 18, 2014 | 2:21 AM EST

In the lead editorial for Thursday’s paper, The Washington Post blasted President Barack Obama’s decision to move toward normalized relations with the communist regime in Cuba as “naive” in awarding “an undeserved bailout” and “new lease on life” to “a 50-year-old failed regime.”

By Tom Johnson | December 18, 2014 | 1:03 AM EST

The Esquire blogger is pleased that with Obama’s executive action on immigration and the shift on Cuba, “the Republicans now have two major freak-outs in their base that will do nothing except inflame the implacable Right, and thereby cripple the party's ability to reach out to the new Hispanic voters it claims it wants to attract.”

By Curtis Houck | December 17, 2014 | 11:58 PM EST

Following the trend set when news broke early Wednesday, the major broadcast networks continued their praising of the move by President Obama to seek normalized relations with Cuba on their Wednesday night newscasts. 

Between the “big three” of ABC, CBS, and NBC, they made only a few, brief mentions over the course of their 30-minute programs that Cuba was both a communist country and brutal in the treatment of its own people (especially dissenters). 

By Tim Graham | December 17, 2014 | 10:12 PM EST

The blog Patterico’s Pontifications ably dismantled Washington Post writer Justin Moyer’s bizarrely titled blog “Why North Korea has every reason to be upset about Sony’s The Interview.” Moyer asked Americans to imagine how they'd like a film when "the leader assassinated in the film was a president of the United States." But when leftists made a Bush-assassination "documentary" in 2006, the Post praised its "dexterity."

By Curtis Houck | December 17, 2014 | 9:20 PM EST

During Wednesday’s NBC Nightly News, correspondent Mark Potter reported from Havana, Cuba on the news that President Obama was altering U.S. relations with the communist state and parroted a long-standing liberal argument as to why Cuba’s economy has struggled for over half a century.

Speaking about the regime of Fidel and Raul Castro, Potter chose not to blame the policies of the Castros, but those of the United States in why the island nation has suffered economically: “His revolution is showing its age too and Havana, known for its charm and vintage cars, is on life support, its economy crippled by the long-standing U.S. Embargo. People here now hope that will change.”

By Ken Shepherd | December 17, 2014 | 9:13 PM EST

During a discussion on Wednesday's Hardball about former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's reticence to speak out on pressing political issues and her tendency to eschew spontaneity in favor of carefully crafted, calculated statements, panelist Michelle Bernard did raise the point that Clinton has tended to evolve over time to be what she thinks her audience wants her to be. As an example, she raised the audio recording that came to light earlier this year wherein she chuckled as she recalled her successful defense of an alleged child rapist.

Yet when Bernard brought up that allegation, fellow panelist and leftist writer David Corn of Mother Jones magazine objected strenuously, trying to keep Bernard from recounting the details of the incident.