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By Kyle Drennen | October 8, 2014 | 12:13 PM EDT

In an interview aired on Wednesday's CBS This Morning, co-host Charlie Rose lectured former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta on criticizing President Obama in a new memoir: "There are those who say, you know, he appointed you to two of the highest positions that this country has to offer, just wait until he's out of office before criticizing."

Panetta pushed back: "Do you know what? It's exactly because I am very loyal to this president and because I want him to succeed that I think it's important to raise these issues now....And besides that, I don't think you put a hold on history. I think the American people are entitled to understand history and what's involved in the policy decisions that this country makes..."

By Tom Johnson | October 8, 2014 | 11:08 AM EDT

Talking Points Memo’s Josh Marshall says Ernst’s ideas about localism and the ACA are “insane” and remind him of something you’d hear from “militia types.”

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 8, 2014 | 10:10 AM EDT

Following a Tuesday night report in which the CBS Evening News blasted GOP campaign ads on ISIS, Wednesday’s CBS This Morning went even further in playing up the supposed outrage at a GOP congressional candidate’s campaign ad. CBS reporter Nancy Cordes pushed how Republican congressional candidate Wendy Rogers ran “the first ad to show an ISIS captive and reaction was swift. On Arizona Republican Wendy Rogers' Facebook page one person wrote “you have disrespected James Foley's parents and his memory.” The other called the ad “sick, pathetic, and disgusting.”’

By Tim Graham | October 8, 2014 | 7:13 AM EDT

It’s easily guessed that no one at the New York Times would welcome a book titled “The Assassination of Barack Obama.” But the Times is in love with a book titled “The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher.”

This book of short stories by British author Hilary Mantel graced the cover of Sunday’s book review, but mysteriously, that review by Terry Castle didn’t discuss the short story on killing Thatcher while she was Britain's prime minister until the penultimate paragraph. That’s because I missed the Gray Lady’s other celebrations of Mantel’s Maggie-murder tale.

By Curtis Houck | October 7, 2014 | 11:55 PM EDT

On Tuesday evening, the CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley was the only broadcast network newscast to have any coverage of the upcoming midterm elections, which are four weeks away from Tuesday. 

While that was the case, the just over two-minute-long segment wasn’t free of liberal bias, as it criticized Republican candidates for running ads on the issue of fighting the Islamic terrorist group ISIS since President Obama “does have a strategy now” for confronting the group in Iraq and Syria.

By Tom Blumer | October 7, 2014 | 11:28 PM EDT

The dictionary tells us that "a few" is "a small number of persons or things." Though there is some ambiguity in the guidance I have reviewed, it's fair to say that "Generally a few is more than 2."

Not at the Associated Press, where "a few" can apparently be two, at least when it comes to "fact-checking" President Obama's grandiose claims in his Thursday speech at Northwestern University. Thanks to Obama's primary contention that "it is indisputable that our economy is stronger today than when I took office," any economy-related statistic was fair game for the AP's Christopher Rugaber. But the AP reporter chose only to address two nitty-gritty items, while avoiding any attempt to evaluate Obama's core assertion.

By Brent Bozell and Tim Graham | October 7, 2014 | 11:02 PM EDT

Bill Maher is no one’s idea of a disinterested scholar on religion. He’s long been the loudest, most obnoxious barroom brawler for atheism. What makes his argument toxic is that it isn't an intellectual defense of atheism. It is a sophomoric, boorish attack on religion, wholly dependent on yuk-yuk lines. These attacks have drawn little attention of late, perhaps because he's so predictable, but in the last few weeks, Maher has drawn new attention for singling out Islam as the worst of all them all. He almost sounded pro-Christian (by comparison) in a surprisingly contentious PBS interview with Charlie Rose wherein he slammed militant Islam.

Then he fought with Ben Affleck on his HBO show on October 3. Suddenly  the liberal media discovered Maher's argument...and rushed to side with Affleck.

By Ken Shepherd | October 7, 2014 | 9:52 PM EDT

Former CIA director and Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta should have at least waited until after the 2014 midterms to publish his memoirs, seeing as they contain sharp criticisms of President Obama, Hardball host Chris Matthews argued on his October 7 program, lamenting Panetta's lack of "loyalty" to the administration. "Why's he doing this?!" Matthews whined.

By Curtis Houck | October 7, 2014 | 9:09 PM EDT

Ed Schultz used his opening monologue during his MSNBC show on Tuesday to paint Republicans as the “desperate” and “delusional” party in trouble ahead of the midterm elections and informed his audience that “people are better off today than they were four years ago” (before dismissing the struggling wages in the country as “a different thing”).

He began by dismissing the idea that Republicans are better positioned to gain ground in Congress following the midterm elections and strangely bashed The Washington Post and The New York Times for predicting GOP victories. He said The Washington Post was “trying to convince the world” that Republicans will succeed in November while the liberal New York Times apparently “doesn’t seem to get enough of it.”

By Randy Hall | October 7, 2014 | 8:01 PM EDT

One of the tightest races in this year's midterm election is the contest in Arkansas, where Democratic incumbent senator Mark Pryor is struggling to be re-elected over popular Republican candidate Tom Cotton, who currently is a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

During Monday's edition of MSNBC's Morning Joe program, political correspondent Kasie Hunt played a recording of her asking Pryor what was considered a “softball question” since the Democrat had run a 30-second advertisement a month ago accusing his GOP opponent of "being pro-Ebola" for “opposing more funding for public health programs while approving upper-class tax cuts.”

By Ken Shepherd | October 7, 2014 | 6:36 PM EDT

MSNBC.com front-page editors probably didn't consider just how bad this looks to the average person who has any awareness of Slick Willy's proclivities.

By Tim Graham | October 7, 2014 | 5:46 PM EDT

In an interview with Time for 10 Questions in the October 13 edition, Time’s Belinda Luscombe asked Marxist professor (and for a while, Tavis Smiley’s public radio co-host) Cornel West whether he voted for Obama in 2012. 

West replied "I couldn't vote for a war criminal. He's tied to war crimes and drones dropping bombs on innocent people."

By Ken Shepherd | October 7, 2014 | 5:24 PM EDT

"'Horrendous' Ruling: Federal court upholds controversial voter ID law" blared the top-of-the-page teaser headline for Zachary Roth's October 7 story on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals upholding the Badger State's 2012 voter ID law which has been tangled up in court for the past two years. 

By Matthew Balan | October 7, 2014 | 4:46 PM EDT

Left-wing academic Marc Lamont Hill blasted atheists Bill Maher and Sam Harris on Monday's CNN Tonight for their blunt views about the Islamic faith: "When he [actor Sam Harris] says that Islam is the mother lode of bad ideas, that is horrific; it is offensive; and, as Ben [Affleck] said...quite frankly, it's racist." Hill contended that "Islam is not uniquely violent or primarily violent or any more prone to violence than any other religion."

By Kyle Drennen | October 7, 2014 | 4:27 PM EDT

While ignoring any mention of the pivotal midterm election less than a month away that could decide control of the United States Senate, on Tuesday, NBC's Today instead devoted a full two-minute segment in its first hour to newly discovered photos of John and Jackie Kennedy's wedding – from 61 years ago.

Co-host Matt Lauer introduced the segment by announcing "a stunning series of never-before-seen photographs from the wedding of John and Jacqueline Kennedy." In the report that followed, correspondent Peter Alexander proclaimed: "It was one of the most celebrated American weddings of the 20th century, the handsome young senator and his beautiful bride....Now more than six decades since Camelot, a never-before-seen glimpse at that historic wedding day, September 12th, 1953."