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By Kristine Marsh | November 24, 2014 | 12:40 PM EST

Here’s today’s installment of “Imagine if this had been a conservative …” 

As Newsbusters reported last week, the founder of the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), which markets itself as the nation’s largest LGBT rights organization, was arrested Nov.18 for allegedly sexually abusing a 15-year-old boy. Terrence Bean, 66, is a Democratic money man, prominent liberal activist and Obama ally. Bean’s 25-year-old former boyfriend was also charged in the crimes. 

By Tom Blumer | November 24, 2014 | 12:10 PM EST

Demonstrating that serving as the Palace Guard for Dear Leader is a 24-7-365 enterprise, Zachary A. Goldfarb, policy editor at The Washington Post, somehow felt the need on Sunday morning to critique the Saturday Night Live opening skit which appeared the previous evening.

Twelve hours after the skit was first broadcast, Goldfarb, whose whose full archive going back to August indicates that he has not written a WaPo item for Sunday publication in the past four months, nitpicked a comedy skit for — oh the humanity! — failing to distinguish between an "Executive Order" and "executive action" (bolds are mine):

By Katie Yoder | November 24, 2014 | 12:00 PM EST

It’s called being a sore-loser. As journalists’ latest cause – pushing for the cancellation of the Duggar family show – fell flat, the media had a meltdown, complete with name-calling and murder accusations. 

A three-month-old Change.org petition demanding TLC cancel its “19 Kids and Counting” show reached 150,000 signatures Nov. 22. The petition bashed the show’s stars, the Duggar family, for “LGBTQ fear mongering.” In response, LifeSite organized a counter-petition on that now boasts 180,000 signatures – after four days. While TLC stayed silent, media attacked the “homophobic” family and faulted Michelle Duggar of “think[ing] that she’s stabbing gay Americans” while “bloodying herself.” 

By Jeffrey Meyer | November 24, 2014 | 11:06 AM EST

On Sunday morning, a heated debate broke out on NBC’s Meet the Press between former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and MSNBC’s Michael Eric Dyson surrounding a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri’s eventual decision on whether or not to bring charges against Officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown. During the combative segment, Mayor Giuliani argued that with regards to Ferguson “93 percent of blacks in America are killed by other blacks. We`re talking about the exception here.” Dyson, who is a frequent fill-in host on MSNBC, took particular offense to Giuliani’s comments and insisted that “ this is a defensive mechanism of white supremacy at work in your mind, sir.”

By John-Henry Westen | November 24, 2014 | 10:03 AM EST

Welcome to the newest battle in America's culture war. Last week, people who have long claimed they stand for "tolerance" engaged in vicious attacks on one of America's most-beloved families. In doing so, they proved once again that their primary goal is not peaceful co-existence, but the elimination of traditional values in America.

By Clay Waters | November 24, 2014 | 8:56 AM EST

New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan reluctantly waded into the paper's coverage of the Israel-Palestinian conflict in her latest Sunday column, relaying criticism from both sides before throwing up her hands and defending her paper as fair and balanced. But anyone who's read Jerusalem bureau chief Jodi Rudoren's coverage knows that's a sad joke.

By Mark Finkelstein | November 24, 2014 | 8:34 AM EST

You'd think Joe Scarborough would have learned by now to avoid inflammatory statements about the Trayvon Martin case. Back when that case first broke, Scarborough immediately branded George Zimmerman a "murderer," an accusation for which he later declined to apologize because he was not currently in office.

But there was Scarborough at it again this morning.  On today's Morning Joe, he sought to contrast the Michael Brown case with that of Trayvon Martin. In Ferguson, "we don't know the evidence," said Joe. Whereas in the Trayvon Martin case, said Scarborough, "you had a guy chase a guy around a neighborhood and shoot him because he was black."

By Tim Graham | November 24, 2014 | 8:02 AM EST

Monday's Washington Post carried a huge three-page article on its former employee, Jose Antonio Vargas, an illegal alien and amnesty activist. The headline was "HIDE, THEN SEEK: Amid Obama's executive actions, immigration activist Jose Antonio Vargas tirelessly pursues change -- even as he hopes to reunite with his mother." The headline inside was "From journalism to activism: A life on the run."

By Melissa Mullins | November 23, 2014 | 11:16 PM EST

On Friday, Bill Maher, host of HBO’s Real Time brought up Jonathan Gruber, the economist who was an advisor and main architect on Obamacare and got caught crediting the “stupidity” of Americans to get the bill passed. Maher joked they were “soulmates” and likened his fellow Americans to dogs, and didn’t understand why anything Gruber said about the average American's stupidity was considered controversial.

By Tim Graham | November 23, 2014 | 7:26 PM EST

The Washington Post has already declared the Best Books of 2014, with five weeks left to go. As usual, a pile of liberal favorites, like Capital by French socialist Thomas Piketty were on the list. There was one surprising result: the Post's Top 50 Nonfiction Books has three Obama-cabinet memoirs on the list, including the doorstop by presidential candidate Hillary Clinton:

By Tom Johnson | November 23, 2014 | 4:40 PM EST

The Talking Points Memo editor and publisher claims that illegal immigration is similar to same-sex marriage in the sense that “even if you think those things are terrible it's very hard to find a victim. And it's even harder to explain why that victim is you.” He writes that it doesn’t make sense to argue that “anti-immigration Americans -- and let's be honest, mainly white people -- are oppressed in some way by having undocumented immigrants be able to walk around in the open and be able to work in the open.”

By Jeffrey Meyer | November 23, 2014 | 1:00 PM EST

Chuck Todd, NBC News Political Director and moderator of Meet the Press, spoke with Senators Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) on Sunday to discuss a variety of issues including President Obama’s recent executive action on immigration as well as the Benghazi terrorist attack. After discussing immigration for the majority of the interview, Todd brought up a new House Intelligence Committee report on Benghazi and eagerly asked Republican Jeff Flake “is it time for the Republicans to drop the Benghazi conspiracy theories?”

By Jeffrey Meyer | November 23, 2014 | 10:28 AM EST

Following President Obama’s decision to ignore Congress and issue an executive action on immigration reform, Saturday Night Live hilariously mocked the decision on their Saturday night broadcast. During the show’s opening, SNL did their own “School House Rock” segment featuring an immigration reform bill being shoved down the steps of Capitol Hill by President Obama, played by Jay Pharoah, in favor of his preferred choice, an executive action. 

By Tom Blumer | November 23, 2014 | 10:08 AM EST

How long it would have taken from the time of its exposure for the press to have prominently reported on an email sent from the the Bush 43 White House to its Justice Department asking, "Any way we can fix the New York Times?" We can be confident that it would have taken less than a New York minute, and that saturation coverage would have continued for days.

Well, one revelation in a series of Saturday tweets by former CBS reporter Sharyl Attkisson, one of only a very few establishment press journalists who did serious reporting on the Department of Justice's Operation Fast & Furious Mexican gun-running operations beginning in 2011, is that the Obama administration was considering what it could do to "fix" another news operation.

By Jeffrey Meyer | November 23, 2014 | 9:39 AM EST

Chuck Todd, NBC News Political Director and moderator of Meet the Press, appeared on Sunday’s Today to preview his show and had some harsh words for Republicans in the wake of President Obama’s executive action on immigration. Speaking to co-host Erica Hill, Todd argued that “politically on Capitol Hill it’s very toxic. I think congressional Republicans they are united on one issue, they don't like how the president went about doing this. But after that, they don't quite know how to retaliate politically.”