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By Connor Williams | May 27, 2015 | 11:33 AM EDT

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul stopped by for a visit on the May 26 edition of the Daily Show, where host Jon Stewart attacked the Kentucky senator for his position on religious liberty. Stewart argued that Christians already serve sinners anyway, so serving gay weddings shouldn’t be any different:

By Tom Blumer | May 27, 2015 | 11:22 AM EDT

Associated Press reporter Sarah El Deeb and Abu Bilal al-Homsi, the person she now describes as a "Syrian fighter," have had a long acquaintance.

Sarah's and Abu's long-term relationship culminated in a Tuesday afternoon story which AP condensed into 140 characters on Twitter as follows: "Marriage, honeymoons and welfare: @AP exclusive shows Islamic State membership has its privileges." A great deal of justified outrage has followed the release of El Deeb's dispatch for "romancing the Stone Age" by glorifying the advantages accruing to an Islamic State jihadist. More attention needs to be paid to her history with al-Homsi, and her "reporting" in general.

By Tom Johnson | May 27, 2015 | 11:03 AM EDT

Tuesday’s New York Times piece on how the problematic phrase “established by the state” got into and stayed in the Affordable Care Act provoked a great many blasts from lefty bloggers at the plaintiffs’ case in King v. Burwell. Two especially heated posts came from MSNBC’s Steve Benen and Esquire’s Charles Pierce.

Benen, a producer for The Rachel Maddow Show and the primary writer for the show’s blog, claimed that almost no one believes there’s any merit to the plaintiffs’ case: “There are effectively two competing factions: those who acknowledge that the litigation is hopelessly insane, and those who know the case is hopelessly insane but pretend otherwise for the sake of appearances...The case [conservatives are] pushing…is based entirely on a lie.” Meanwhile, Pierce charged that the "preposterous" case emerged from a conservative “alternate universe” sustained by “wingnut welfare."

By Katie Yoder | May 27, 2015 | 10:51 AM EDT

Yes, on America’s college campuses, liberal commencement speakers outnumber conservatives (it would be shocking if they didn’t.) But not by the margin CBS would have viewers believe.

During CBS Evening News on May 26, host Scott Pelley played different clips of university commencement speakers offering advice to the class of 2015. Beginning with Bon Jovi and finishing with Bill Nye, “The Science Guy,” Pelley’s segment showed only one conservative speaker out of ten liberal speakers: former president George W. Bush. 

By Geoffrey Dickens | May 27, 2015 | 10:49 AM EDT

Social conservative-haters in the liberal media are sharpening their knives today as Rick Santorum is set to announce his 2016 presidential ambitions. From his arrival to the Senate in 1995 through his 2012 presidential run the media have attacked the former Pennsylvania Republican Senator as a “terrifying” “theocrat” who wants to impose a “Christian version of Sharia law.”

By Tim Graham | May 27, 2015 | 7:12 AM EDT

Washington Post reporter Caitlin Dewey’s beat is the Internet. But her big piece on the front page of Wednesday’s Style section is about something broader: “Forsaking monogamy: The evolution of relationships has made affairs less clandestine and less combustive. And of course there are Web sites to help match tryst-seekers.”

This being the Post, there is no space for critics of the "evolution" of online adultery Web sites or their users. Dewey promoted the “non-monogamous dating site Open Minded,” where her married female subject, Jessie,  advertised, “I’m into building deep and loving relationships that add to the joy and aliveness of being human.” She talked her husband into “ethical non-monogamy.”

By Curtis Houck | May 27, 2015 | 1:01 AM EDT

At the top of Tuesday’s Kelly File on the Fox News Channel, host Megyn Kelly tore into President Obama and his remarks at Arlington National Cemetery on Memorial Day where “America's commander in chief celebrate[d] the absence of a major war, while his own top security advisers warn the American people directly that the danger right now is greater than at any time in a half century.”

By Brent Bozell and Tim Graham | May 26, 2015 | 11:09 PM EDT

The latest scorecard from the American Conservative Union is out, and the voters of Virginia might want to file a complaint about truth in advertising with the press corps. Senators Tim Kaine and Mark Warner have routinely been portrayed in news reports as “moderates” and “centrists.” But after two years in the Senate, Tim Kaine has a perfect zero on the conservative scale. Mark Warner has a lifetime score of 10.33 percent conservative, but his last two annual scores have been a 4 and an 8. They could be mistaken for Barbara Mikulski (lifetime rating of 5.1).

By Ken Shepherd | May 26, 2015 | 9:25 PM EDT

Irish voters' approval of same-sex marriage via ballot referendum on Friday proved the perfect excuse for Hardball host Chris Matthews to bash Republican presidential contenders for their steadfast support for traditional marriage and criticism of judicial activism in redefining the institution.

For what it's worth, Matthews and his panelists all but smeared Ireland as, well, backwards for having held on to socially conservative policy positions while much of the rest of Europe was far more socially liberal.

By Curtis Houck | May 26, 2015 | 9:00 PM EDT

On Tuesday night, the “big three” of ABC, CBS, and NBC neglected to mention news that the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals had ruled earlier in the day against President Obama’s executive amnesty and denied another request that the injunction on the plan should be lifted. While the networks ignored this story, the Fox News Channel's Special Report with Bret Baier led its Tuesday show with a full report on the court’s 2-1 decision against the Obama administration. 

By Melissa Mullins | May 26, 2015 | 8:04 PM EDT

This has to go down as one of the most idiotic comparisons of all time.  On Sunday, Reuters posted a story trying to link the Texas biker gang shootings to the peaceful patriotic bikers making their way to the Rolling Thunder event held in Washington D.C., as they have done each Memorial Day weekend since 1988.

The story headline reads, “Thousands of bikers gather in Washington to honor vets.”  Sounds innocent enough, right?  Wrong. Check out the opening paragraph:

By Ken Shepherd | May 26, 2015 | 7:08 PM EDT

"Gun store raises hackles in Arlington," blared the Washington Post Metro section headline for Patricia Sullivan's May 26 story. "But neighbors have little recourse to block shop on Lee Highway," added the subhead.

By Scott Whitlock | May 26, 2015 | 5:54 PM EDT

Liberal newspapers to the History Channel: Don't make Texas look heroicThe New York Times, The Washington Post, Britain's Guardian newspaper and others are all trashing a new miniseries on the Lone Star State. The Post lamented the fact that the five episodes fail to portray the "Alamo and the Texas Revolution [as] a land grab by white slaveowners." 

By Connor Williams | May 26, 2015 | 4:45 PM EDT

Contrary to when Ted Cruz announced he was seeking the presidency, the extremist label has hardly been applied to self-avowed Democratic-Socialist Bernie Sanders (I-VT) as he prepared to launch his 2016 campaign with an event in Vermont. While the mainstream press frequently labeled Cruz radical, dangerous, and slimy, no such words were used to describe the Vermont Senator on the May 26 edition of The Rundown with Jose Diaz Balart. In fact, guests Mark Murray and Steve Kornacki both gave rather glowing reviews of Sanders.

By Tom Blumer | May 26, 2015 | 4:06 PM EDT

Seldom does one see such an obvious betrayal of reporters' biased mindsets as the one found in the opening paragraph of an Associated Press report earlier today on CEO pay at major U.S. publicly-held companies.

According to the AP's Steve Rothwell and Ryan Nakashima, that entertainers, whose incomes are derived from leveraging special physical and artistic talents, deserve all the money they can get their hands on. But CEOs at major companies — well, not so much: