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By Curtis Houck | March 30, 2015 | 10:35 PM EDT

On their Monday evening newscasts, the major broadcast networks kept up their attacks on the State of Indiana for having enacted a religious freedom law that aims to protect individuals from government infringement based on their religious beliefs. While ABC, CBS, and NBC mentioned that there are those supporting the law, their coverage continued to veer off in a slanted direction against the law by painting Republicans as being “in damage control mode” while the “avalanche of criticism” continues to grow.

By Laura Flint | March 30, 2015 | 10:23 PM EDT

Ayaan Hirsi Ali has risked her life to promote women’s rights in and outside of Islam. She was born in Somalia, where she survived female genital mutilation at the hands of her grandmother. She grew up to serve as a Member of Parliament in the Netherlands, wrote a script for a film that dared to criticize Islamic treatment of women, and when the death threats became too much for even the government secret service to handle, she was forced into hiding.

Of course, none of this mattered to Jon Stewart, who on the March 23 episode of The Daily Show chose to spend the entire interview feeling tenderly for Islam, claiming that people tend to “single out as though there is something inherently wrong with it that is not wrong with other religions.”

By Tom Johnson | March 30, 2015 | 9:18 PM EDT

It’s fair to say most conservatives aren’t big fans of Jon Stewart, but according to TV critic Sonia Saraiya, Trevor Noah, Stewart’s successor as host of The Daily Show, is in for an even nastier response from the right, much of it having to do with his skin color.

Apropos of Comedy Central’s Monday announcement that Noah, a biracial South African comedian, will take over for Stewart sometime this year, Saraiya remarked that “this country spent years embroiled in a debate over whether an American citizen who became the president was ‘really’ American; what are we going to do to Trevor Noah? Conservative critics have a practiced, doublespeaking method of piling on the heat on figures who stand out because of their race or gender or sexuality, while protesting that they are doing no such thing.”

By Ken Shepherd | March 30, 2015 | 8:58 PM EDT

If then-Senator John F. Kennedy could have looked into the future and seen his youngest brother's career in the world's greatest deliberative body, he'd have named Sen. Ted Kennedy as among the best to have ever graced its hallowed halls, insisted Hardball host Chris Matthews in his effusive Let Me Finish commentary on the March 30 program, pegged to the opening of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate.

By Tom Blumer | March 30, 2015 | 8:00 PM EDT

UPDATE, March 31: This morning in an email, the AP's Lederman pointed me to a Saturday afternoon "Big Story" item time-stamped the day before the report to which this blog post below links. For whatever reason, that earlier "Big Story" item has more detail than what appears, despite the Sunday time stamp, to be Lederman's original report posted at the AP's national site. In that "Big Story" item, Lederman writes that "Like last time, the White House arranged for the reporters covering the president to wait at a separate location nearby where Obama won't be visible," and that "Previous administrations have allowed brief news media coverage during presidential rounds of golf. Obama's policy generally is not to allow reporters to observe him." Lederman did not mention reporters' decision to stay in a shed rather than return to their hotels. The posts' point about reporters' willingness to submit to what I described as "dismissive, insulting treatment" stands.

At the Associated Press on Sunday, Josh "Lapdog" Lederman filed a brief report telling readers the names of the captains of industry who would be golfing with President Barack Obama that day. Bigwigs with the Floridian, the Boston Celtics, and (yes) even Halliburton, the former source of all evil during the Bush 43 administration, were in the foursome.

Lederman "somehow" failed to note that the White House ordered reporters back to their hotels, and that when they refused, they were banished to a shed. Paul Bedard at the Washington Examiner has the details Lederman didn't care to mention, even in passing:

By Tom Blumer | March 30, 2015 | 5:06 PM EDT

Maybe the left needs to rethink their oft-present and deep-seated hatred of all things associated with Comcast, other cable companies, and the satellite TV providers. It turns out that those "evil" entities have done quite a bit to cushion left-leaning CNN and MSNBC from what would otherwise be a harsh financial reality.

The Associated Press's David Bauder, in an item which somehow was deemed to be deserving of "Big Story" status, essentially acknowledged that in his Sunday afternoon review of the cratering and chaotic situation at MSNBC when he gave an overview of how the cable news channels' revenues shake out.

By Kyle Drennen | March 30, 2015 | 4:53 PM EDT

On Monday, Comedy Central announced that South African comedian Trevor Noah would be replacing Jon Stewart as host of The Daily Show. To get a feel for Noah's brand of humor, one could simply watch his debut on the fake news show in December of 2014, when he jokingly declared that present-day America had worse race relations than Apartheid South Africa.

By Ken Shepherd | March 30, 2015 | 4:34 PM EDT

Former Red Eye co-host Bill Schulz has a piece today at The Daily Beast where he jokingly (?) compares the Tea Party political movement to the Scientology cult.

By Matthew Balan | March 30, 2015 | 4:11 PM EDT

On Monday, the Washington Post's Sandhya Somashekhar zeroed in on the "unabashed approach" of Carafem, Washington, DC's latest abortion center, which, in her words, "reflects a new push to destigmatize the nation's most controversial medical procedure by talking about it openly and unapologetically." Somashekhar, the liberal newspaper's "social change" reporter, spotlighted how the upstart "aims to feel more like a spa than a medical clinic."

By Tim Graham | March 30, 2015 | 3:51 PM EDT

Tim Russert used to say “If it’s Sunday, it’s Meet the Press.” Of David Brooks, we might joke, “If it’s Friday, Brooks is bashing Ted Cruz.” On both NPR and PBS Friday, the purported conservative-leaning balance to public broadcasting’s natural socialist impulses insisted the problem was that Cruz was just too smart.

On NPR’s All Things Considered, the headline for the week-in-politics segment was “Sen. Harry Reid's Retirement, Cruz's Appeal To Far-Right.”

By Kristine Marsh | March 30, 2015 | 3:46 PM EDT

A new digital short is blasting Indiana as a state full of bigots. In the style of a tourism ad, the parody shows images of all things Indiana is famous for, from it’s “world class cities” to its NFL team to the Indianapolis 500. The narrator’s voice croons, “That hoosier hospitality makes everyone welcome --especially, bigots! Whether you’re a family of bigots, a couple of bigots or just an individual bigot” the ad claims, you can “shame and humiliate people who are different from you to your heart’s content.” The ad cites the newly-signed bill, “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” as the reason bigots live in Indiana. 

This ad isn’t just from a random Youtube user. The parody comes from “Internet Action Force” (IAF), a new digital shorts website launched by the New York Post. According to local news site Capital New York, IAF is run by a gamut of writers and comedians from left-leaning outlets such as Comedy Central, Conan O’ Brien’s TeamCoco.com, and Funny or Die. Senior Editor Nick Poppy even comes from working as a digital video editor for ABC News. 

By Scott Whitlock | March 30, 2015 | 3:46 PM EDT

Ever since Colorado legalized in 2014, CBS This Morning has obsessed over all things pot, showcasing the best places to get high. On Monday, reporter Mark Strassmann touted a new app called High There. Strassmann gushed, "Think of it as Facebook or Tinder for stoners where nearby cannabis users can connect." 

By Kyle Drennen | March 30, 2015 | 2:26 PM EDT

Early on Monday's NBC Today, fill-in co-host Willie Geist hyped "the growing debate over a controversial law that critics call anti-gay....[who] say it permits businesses, among other things, to refuse service to same-sex couples on religious grounds." Correspondent Gabe Gutierrez followed: "This morning a huge backlash against Indiana's new Religious Freedom Restoration Act and Governor Mike Pence is on the defensive."

By Tom Blumer | March 30, 2015 | 1:38 PM EDT

At the Washington Post on March 18, fact-checker Glenn Kessler gave Secretary of State John Kerry "four Pinocchios" for his resume-puffing "whopper" that he helped organize "the first hearings in the Senate" on global warming in 1988.

In the process, Kessler inadvertently perpetuated a related myth and got called out for it. He admirably corrected himself this morning. Additionally, while assigning four Pinocchios for himself, he dished out four Pinocchios to "all concerned." That's a long list, as will be seen after the jump.

By Katie Yoder | March 30, 2015 | 1:23 PM EDT

A new play aims to tell what the media didn’t: what really happened in Ferguson August 9, 2014. 

As the first dramatization of the Michael Brown shooting, Ferguson draws from grand-jury witness testimony to reveal the truth about the Ferguson, Mo. police shooting. The play hits the stage April 26 through 29 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles – and asks the audience to play jury.