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By Mark Finkelstein | December 15, 2014 | 6:40 PM EST

With 2015 only a couple of weeks away, Ed Schultz just managed to sneak under the wire in the race for Most Inane Question of the Year by an MSNBC Host.  Speaking to Valerie Plame's husband Joe Wilson on the The Ed Show this evening, Schultz suggested: "Your wife was outed by the Vice-President and now he's saying he has no problem with torture. How do you feel about that? I mean isn't it torture what your family went through?"

Wilson wasn't wacky enough to bite on Ed's bait, but in other comments made clear that he would like to see Cheney prosecuted in international and/or domestic courts.

By Matthew Balan | December 15, 2014 | 4:54 PM EST

On CNN's Reliable Sources on Sunday, University of Virginia student Alex Pinkleton revealed how Rolling Stone's Sabrina Rubin Erdely, who wrote the disputed Rolling Stone story on alleged rape at the college, acted more like an "advocate" than a reporter as she interviewed people for the article. Pinkleton, a friend of the woman who made the rape accusation, asserted that Erdely "did have an agenda, and part of that agenda was showing how monstrous fraternities themselves as an institution are, and blaming the administration for a lot of the sexual assaults."

By Ken Shepherd | December 15, 2014 | 4:19 PM EST

Washington Post metro columnist John Kelly has come under scrutiny here at NewsBusters for his disdain of gun rights and his push for more stringent gun control. So it is all the more amusing, in the Advent season no less, to read his December 15 column devoted to his disdain for... candles?!

By P.J. Gladnick | December 15, 2014 | 3:57 PM EST

An article about a dramatic decrease in the price of oil appeared in the Washington Post's WonkBlog. However a certain F-word is notable by its very obvious absence. So what is that word? "Fracking."

By Matthew Philbin and Kristine Marsh | December 15, 2014 | 3:47 PM EST

Thank Gaia for the ever-vigilant ACLU! Who else would have discerned the dire threat to civil liberty lurking in a California school’s effort to raise money for starving children in Africa? 

A middle school in San Marcos, Cal., partnered with a local charity, Friends and Family Community Connection (FFCC), to raise money to send meals to children in Tanzania – innocent enough, right? Wrong. It turns out FFCC also worked with Kids Around the World (KATW) to accomplish the same goal. KATW is [cue sinister music] a Christian charity. 

By Tom Blumer | December 15, 2014 | 2:33 PM EST

One of the more amusing aspects of observing today's left-biased establishment media environment is seeing agenda-driven journalists directly or indirectly convey a clearly inflated sense of their outlets' self-importance.

A recent example of this came Friday from Jacob Silverman at Politico Magazine. In his writeup on conservative firebrand Charles Johnson, Silverman employed the comparative version of a word - "fringy" - rarely used in the political realm. Silverman described Breitbart and The Blaze as "even fringier" than ... well, let's try to figure that one out.

By Katie Yoder | December 15, 2014 | 2:18 PM EST

Oh look, our betters at the New Yorker have found a way to trivialize a Christian holiday while warning us what happens if we don’t convert to their environmental religion. And it’s supposed to be funny, too! 

For the New Yorker’s Christmas issue (Dec. 22, 2014) contributor Ethan Kuperberg published his “Climate-Change Christmas Carols.” Using traditional Christmas songs, he changed the lyrics to reflect (you guessed it!) climate change. “Oh, Christmas Tree” became a salute “plastic branches [that] don’t shed” in his piece while “Silent Night” featured cannibalism instead of Christ’s birth. 

By Melissa Mullins | December 15, 2014 | 2:01 PM EST

So apparently there’s a uterus puppet going around the country making videos about abortion clinics and lack thereof.  Yes, there’s a puppet named Eunice, and she’s a sad uterus.

Hans Johnson from JillStanek.com found this great little gem and we just had to share. In the “You Can’t Make This Stuff Up” category comes a video called “The Abortion Desert.”

By Kyle Drennen | December 15, 2014 | 12:22 PM EST

On Monday's CBS This Morning, co-host Gayle King claimed that Americans were "divided" over the CIA's use of enhanced interrogation techniques after September 11th. However, the latest CBS News poll she cited "shows that 49% of Americans feel aggressive interrogation techniques like waterboarding are sometimes justified. 36% say they are never justified." The remaining 14% said that it "depends" or "didn't know."

By Scott Whitlock | December 15, 2014 | 12:19 PM EST

The journalists at CBS This Morning compared the violent, bloody attacks on African Americans during civil rights marches in 1965 to voter ID laws passed by various states in the last few years. Co-anchor Norah O'Donnell talked to Oprah Winfrey, producer of the new film Selma and the movie's star. O'Donnell marveled, "...Given the Voting Rights Act, 1965, I went back and looked. Thirteen states have passed more restrictive voter ID laws in the last three years, that states are trying to make it harder to vote."

By Tim Graham | December 15, 2014 | 11:55 AM EST

The most dishonest advertising in The Washington Post isn’t selling soap or shoes or automobiles. It doesn’t come phonier than this: “Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Post, offering reported opinion from a conservative perspective.”

Rubin spent 2012 insisting that every conservative presidential contender was unelectable except Mitt Romney, who was neither conservative nor electable, as it turned out. Now she's again taking after Sen. Ted Cruz, who she claims is "justifiably hated by his peers."

By Jeffrey Meyer | December 15, 2014 | 11:18 AM EST

On Sunday night, ABC’s Barbara Walters hosted her annual 10 Most Fascinating People program which featured billionaire businessman and conservative donor David Koch as one of the “most fascinating people of 2014.” A preview of the interview aired during Sunday morning’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos portraying Koch as “one of the biggest Republican donors, a reclusive billionaire, David Koch. Democrats love to hate him.” During the full interview, Walters expanded on the liberal attacks against Koch but also detailed the hundreds of millions of dollars he has donated to philanthropic causes over the last several decades.

By Rich Noyes | December 15, 2014 | 8:40 AM EST

This week, journalists seize on a partisan Senate Democratic report to scold the CIA for its conduct of the War on Terror during the Bush era, but deny there's any news value in Jonathan Gruber's admission that ObamaCare was sold using duplicitous tactics, calling it a "nothing burger."

By Tim Graham | December 15, 2014 | 7:08 AM EST

Washington Post media blogger Erik Wemple penned an obituary of sorts on Friday for “the full demise of Rolling Stone’s rape story,” based on the latest discovery from the Post that the man that Jackie (the story’s accuser) cited as her date that night appears to be a student at the University of Virginia.

"It all raises a mind-boggling possibility: that [reporter Sabrina] Erdely made an exhaustive effort to interview peripheral sources, leaving no time for the central ones."

By Tom Blumer | December 15, 2014 | 2:11 AM EST

It's a good thing that establishment press publications like the New York Times have those layers of editors and fact-checkers. They're able to prevent embarrassing things like misstatements of commonly known facts, misidentifications of key parties involved in recent events, and misspellings those sloppy bloggers and new media types routinely publish.

Oh, wait a minute. All three types of errors just occurred in just one New York Times item this weekend. After publishing its original story by Jennifer Steinhauer and Elena Schneider on this Saturday's so-called "Justice For All" March in Washington, which also included coverage of New York's related event, the Times issued a correction which has to be seen to be believed (HT Twitchy):