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By Ken Shepherd | September 16, 2014 | 9:04 PM EDT

MSNBC's Chris Matthews turned a September 16 Politico story about three ne'er-do-well Republican congressmen who are likely to get reelected into an excuse for a Hardball segment to hand-wring about why voters this November are likely to return them handily to Congress. Nowhere in the story, however, did any perpetually ethically-challenged Democratic incumbent get held up as a counterpoint.

By P.J. Gladnick | September 16, 2014 | 7:13 PM EDT

Despite the fact that Politico is reporting about groups that have formed to defend Hillary Clinton during the Benghazi hearing in Congress, no mention is made about Sharyl Attkisson's bombshell report about the scrubbing of documents by her advisers.
 

By Scott Whitlock | September 16, 2014 | 5:07 PM EDT

Time magazine's Joe Klein used the September 22 issue to knock Barack Obama from the left, decrying the "cynical" Barack Obama for giving in to the "ugly," nativist opposition to immigration. Denying any legitimate, philosophical opposition, Klein sneered, "For the first 190 years of U.S. history, opposition to immigration was mostly about religion–Catholicism and Judaism. For the past 50 or so, it’s been mostly about race–Mexicans and other Latinos." 

By Ken Shepherd | September 16, 2014 | 4:24 PM EDT

In an 11-paragraph piece in today's Washington Post, staff writer Rachel Weiner did Democrat John Foust a favor, promoting his new campaign ad savaging Republican opponent Barbara Comstock. Foust and Comstock are competing to win the approval of voters in Virginia's 10th Congressional District.

By Matthew Balan | September 16, 2014 | 3:57 PM EDT

Areva Martin brought in the specter of Jim Crow on Monday's Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN, as she commented on the child abuse case against NFL player Adrian Peterson. Martin contended that "corporal punishment, in any form, is abusive," and emphasized, "We used to not wear helmets when we rode bikes. Women used to smoke when they were pregnant. We used to send our kids to segregated schools. So, there are a lot of things we did twenty and thirty years ago that we now know are hurtful and harmful."

By Kyle Drennen | September 16, 2014 | 3:56 PM EDT

During the first installment of PBS's The Roosevelts: An Intimate History on Sunday, historian Clay Jenkinson and former Newsweek editor turned historian Evan Thomas slammed Theodore Roosevelt as a bloodthirsty "imperialist" who promoted the "glorification of war" and built up a "cult" of personality. [Listen to the audio]

Speaking on Roosevelt's command of the Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War, Jenkinson proclaimed: "There's no question that Roosevelt is an imperialist. Apologists like to try to play this down. But the fact is he's probably the most significant imperialist in American history." Jenkinson seemed troubled by Roosevelt's call for the United States to "take our place in the world's arena."

By Kristine Marsh | September 16, 2014 | 3:24 PM EDT

It’s no secret that Hollywood loves Hillary Clinton, and now some network execs are openly basing their White House characters on her. The media’s new favorite, Dem. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is also an inspiration for some new Fall shows.

CBS will premiere “Madame Secretary” this Sunday night, Sept. 21. According to Politico, the show’s creators were inspired by both Clinton and Gillibrand in their portrayal of a female politician who struggles to juggle work and family life. The show stars Tea Leoni as Elizabeth McCord, a former CIA agent who becomes the new Secretary of State. The character Leoni plays is both blonde and the mother of two children, like Gillibrand. 

By Katie Yoder | September 16, 2014 | 1:44 PM EDT

Oh, the irony. The liberal feminist media are proving to be trailblazers. At least, that is, for male comedians. 

Abortion is “a funny word” – just like “guacamole” – according to Comedian Stephen Colbert’s latest segment. For his Sept. 15 “The Colbert Report” show, Colbert invited actress Mindy Kaling on as a guest to discuss her comments against abortion sitcoms. Following Colbert’s lead, Kaling admitted her show “might” find a “hilarious take on abortion” in the future. 

By Matthew Philbin | September 16, 2014 | 12:44 PM EDT

Sure, nobody expects The Washington Post Editorial Board to earn a “Profile in Courage” entry anytime soon. But with its Sept. 16 editorial on the systematic decades-long sexual abuse of children in Rotherham, England, the Board showed the same cowardice that enabled the Rotherham abusers.

According to the Post, “Sorting out why officials closed their eyes or looked the other way as an estimated 1,400 young girls were raped and brutally exploited from 1997 to 2013 will require Rotherham and the rest of Britain to come to grips with uncomfortable questions about race, class and gender.” But what about the uncomfortable questions about Islam? The editorial never mentioned that.

By Scott Whitlock | September 16, 2014 | 12:18 PM EDT

Rosie O'Donnell appeared shocked by the suggestion that Barack Obama "doesn't love people." The View co-host sparred with Republican Nicolle Wallace over the President and demonstrated that she's still obsessed with George W. Bush. After Wallace suggested that Joe Biden has an easier time because "Joe Biden genuinely loves people," O'Donnell sputtered, "So, are you implying that Obama doesn't?...He doesn't love people? Oh, wow." 

By Tianna DiMartino | September 16, 2014 | 12:16 PM EDT

What is it with high-placed liberal women and crude talk? First we learn that Obama National Security advisor Susan Rice throws around the charming “motherf*****” in meetings with allies. Then Senator Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) makes a joke about testicles on national TV. Now a senator casually deploys biologically impossible suggestions. 

Appearing on HuffPost Live to hawk her new book Sept. 15, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) was discussing sexism she said she’s encountered in her career. After the host of the interview praised her restraint after receiving a particularly egregious comment, Gillibrand explained that her respectable response was only because she “wasn’t in a place to tell him to go f*** himself,” but in a later setting she did “unleash on him.”

By Kyle Drennen | September 16, 2014 | 11:07 AM EDT

NBC, ABC, and CBS completely ignored the latest setback for ObamaCare after news broke Monday that around 115,000 people were expected to lose health insurance coverage at the end of September due to their failure to verify their legal status as United States citizens.

Not only did CBS skip any mention of the bad news for President Obama's signature legislation, but on Tuesday's CBS This Morning, co-host Norah O'Donnell actually touted a good news story about the law in the New York Times: "Federal researchers say the number of uninsured Americans dropped by about 4 million to 41 million during the first quarter of this year. It's the first time the government has counted uninsured Americans since President Obama's Affordable Care Act kicked in last January." [Listen to the audio]

By Mike Ciandella | September 16, 2014 | 10:53 AM EDT

Legal battles against state governor’s with higher political aspirations keep cropping up. But looking deeper into attacks on Republican governors from Texas, Wisconsin and Louisiana reveals George Soros’ checkbook was behind it all – but the news media aren’t about to point that out.

The group that first filed an indictment charge against Texas Gov. Rick Perry was funded by Soros, the liberal billionaire, but the trail of his money didn’t end there. Both the recall election for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and an even less successful recall attempt for Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal were rooted in Soros-funded groups. Among them, these three potential Republican presidential candidates were targeted by groups receiving more than $6.3 million from Soros.

By Mark Finkelstein | September 16, 2014 | 8:14 AM EDT

What's next, Mika?  Giant alligators in the sewers of New York City?  On today's Morning Joe, Mika Brzezinski perpetuated the hoary urban legend that domestic violence spikes on Super Bowl Sunday.

Brzezinski's blunder came in the context of the panel's discussion of the NFL's domestic violence mess. Arguing that football is a violent game and that "there's a connection" with what happens at home, Mika continued, "domestic violence on Super Bowl Sunday. We've seen the numbers. Why is that?" Actually, Brzezinski has apparently not seen the numbers, since that myth has been thoroughly debunked, often by organizations fighting domestic violence, as here, here and here.

By Curtis Houck | September 16, 2014 | 12:15 AM EDT

In a conversation on Twitter with Fox News Channel (FNC) contributor Richard Grenell, Boston Globe reporter Bryan Bender continued the media’s double standard of slamming then-President George W. Bush’s international coalition for the Iraq War and President Obama’s current coalition for fighting the Islamic terrorist group ISIS. 

Writing in a tweet addressed to Grenell, Bender stated that “Bush had no coalition” when going into Iraq. To that claim, Grenell cited how 48 countries were actually part of Bush’s “coalition of the willing” compared to the nine for President Obama’s ISIS coalition (as of Sunday morning).