Chris Matthews: ObamaCare Like a ‘Brilliant Writer…Who Turns In A Paper With A Lot Of Misspellings’

Obama sycophant and Hardball host Chris Matthews just landed what MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell called a “big get” interview this Thursday with the president. So naturally he took to the air on Tuesday's Andrea Mitchell Reports to gush about the chief executive who's been known to send tingles up his leg.

Matthews compared President Obama to a “brilliant writer…with a great theme” who “turns in a paper with a lot of misspellings or bad handwriting.” [One wonders if this is in anyway autobiographical, with Matthews thinking of his misadventures in book writing.] [See video after jump. MP3 audio here.]  

Matthews went on to describe the disastrous ObamaCare rollout as merely “strange” and proclaimed his support for “all the great strengths potentially of a national health care system.”

You can chalk Matthews’ comments to the list of “Chris Matthews’s Multiple Obamagasms” which my colleague Scott Whitlock compiled in preparation for the “exclusive” interview the MSNBC host has with President Obama later this week.

 

See relevant transcript below.


MSNBC

Andrea Mitchell Reports

December 3, 2013

1:36 p.m. Eastern

ANDREA MITCHELL: And in fact President Obama is going to be playing "Hardball" on Thursday. Our own Chris Matthews is going to have an exclusive interview with the president at American University as part of "Hardball's" college tour. Chris Matthews joins me now. Chris, thanks so much for being with us. Big get, huge exclusive. I'm excited to see -- I don't want to take away any thunder or any surprise, but obviously you’re going to have to talk to him about this health care rollout and how he's going to try to turn the page. 

CHRIS MATTHEWS: Well, I'll say this to the people watching from the White House, that if you watch "Hardball," and the way that we have handled that issue and all the other issues to where we put our focus, I'll be doing that Thursday night. I'll be talking about executive accountability and the strange way of this rollout as it has occurred. I think I would compare it, Andrea, to a brilliant writer, perhaps, with a great theme who turns in a paper with a lot of misspellings or bad handwriting. It's a bad way to roll out something. With all the great strengths potentially of a national health care system along these lines the way it was rolled out has hurt it. It hurt its reputation. It's given the other side a lot of talking points to use against the president generally in terms of his competence.

And I'm going to ask about that and focus on the things we have, but also talk about political dysfunction in this country and the inability of the two parties to work together. I was dismayed by the speaker's comment the other day which was picked up in the Post, "Washington Post," that the reason we can't get anything done is that we have divided government. Well hell, we're going to have divided government for years ahead. If the Republicans grab control of the senate by a couple of votes, they won't have the presidency to pass laws and have them signed. They won’t have the 60 votes in the senate. That's the excuse. That we can't get anything done because we have divided political parties who fight with each other. We’ll never get anything done in this country.

So I think there's a failure at the top to get things done. And I don't think you can blame it on the fact the American people haven't made up their mind, they want one political party to run the country. They haven't decided that. They want both political parties to work together. I want to talk about political dysfunction, executive accountability and the questions of how we fight our wars with drones or ground troops. That kind of questioning the president has to deal with in terms of moral principle. It will be the big issues. 

Jeffrey Meyer
Jeffrey Meyer
Jeffrey Meyer is a News Analyst at the Media Research Center.