Gibson Reaches Back to Teddy Roosevelt to Tout 'Universal Health' as Closer Than Ever

ABC's Charles Gibson and CBS's Katie Couric led their newscasts on Tuesday night in a manner which suggested they are along for the ride with President Barack Obama as they celebrated how a Senate committee's vote moved Obama's quest to impose ObamaCare closer to reality.

“In 1912, almost a hundred years ago,” Gibson trumpeted at the top of World News, “Teddy Roosevelt called for universal health care. It now may be closer than at any time since then.” Couric championed “a major victory for President Obama” and how “health care reform cleared a major hurdle today” so “health care reform is closer than it's ever been,” but, she warned, “the battle is still far from over.”

Gibson teased: “Tonight, vital vote. A key Republican joins with Democrats in an historic move forward on health care. We cover today's vote, and talk with Senator Olympia Snowe.” With “Crucial Vote” on screen, he led: 
Good evening. In 1912, almost a hundred years ago, Teddy Roosevelt called for universal health care. It now may be closer than at any time since then. The Senate Finance Committee today voted 14 to 9 in favor of a bill that would overhaul the nation's health care system. President Obama called it a milestone...
Gibson's first question to Snowe: “Senator, you are now the only Republican, House or Senate, to vote for any of the health care reform bills that are out there. What do you know that your fellow Republicans don't?”  

Couric teased the October 13 CBS Evening News: “Tonight, a major victory for President Obama as the Senate Finance Committee passes a health care reform bill with one Republican vote. But there's still a long way to go.”

Over “First Hurdle” as the on-screen tag, Couric opened her newscast by seeing ultimate success within reach as she raised just one shortcoming, the lack of a public option:
Good evening, everyone. Well, health care reform cleared a major hurdle today when the Senate Finance Committee passed its version. It does not include a public insurance option. It was approved by a vote of 14 to 9 and technically you could say it's a bipartisan bill, but just one Republican joined the majority Democrats, Olympia Snowe. Although she's not making any promises. And with that, health care reform is closer than it's ever been, but the battle is still far from over. We begin our coverage tonight with Nancy Cordes and that long-awaited committee vote.
Brent Baker
Brent Baker
Brent Baker is the Steven P.J. Wood Senior Fellow and VP for Research and Publications at the Media Research Center