MSNBC's Wolffe: GOPers 'Have Not Tried to Find Any Compassion'

Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, MSNBC.com Executive Editor Richard Wolffe asserted that Republicans "have not tried to find any compassion" since last year's election as he reacted to comments from Maine Republican Governor Paul LePage on the number of his state's residents who are not working. Wolffe:

When you look at what the lessons are coming out of the last election, you'd have to say they're doubling down. They have not tried to find any compassion for people who are still struggling in this economy. And the language speaks to more than just, it's not just a number here. It's the whole idea that there are undeserving people at all, that we don't have a common responsibility to give people a hand up and not a handout.

Below is a transcript of the relevant portion of the Tuesday, October 22, PoliticsNation on MSNBC:

AL SHARPTON: The GOP may not invoke the word 47 percent like Governor LePage, but isn't it alive in their policies?

RICHARD WOLFFE: Well, Rev, you know, when you look at what the lessons are coming out of the last election, you'd have to say they're doubling down. They have not tried to find any compassion for people who are still struggling in this economy.

SHARPTON: Right.

WOLFFE: And the language speaks to more than just, it's not just a number here. It's the whole idea that there are undeserving people at all, that we don't have a common responsibility to give people a hand up and not a handout. There's nobody out there, neither the Democrats, not people like President Obama is saying you don't need to find your own health insurance. He's actually saying, "No, go be self-reliant." This is a debate that is stuck in the 1970s and '80s. Actually, the Democrats have moved on. It's about time Republicans did the same.

(...)

SHARPTON: You know, the Tea Party has been leading this charge to cut everything, Richard. Cut entitlements, cut government programs. And look at the approval rating as a result. Back in February 2010 just 25 percent had an unfavorable view of the Tea Party. Now 49 percent view it unfavorably.

WOLFFE: Yeah, you know, not good policy, not good politics. And it's fine for a Tea Party House Republicans because their districts are so narrowly defined. But if you're running statewide, if you're looking at a Senate race, if you're looking at a governor's race, you've got to find that place in the middle. I don't know how a governor can get elected insulting half of the people he expects to vote for him. It doesn't make any sense. Didn't work for Romney. But also what kind of person are you? I mean, how can you ask people for a vote when you don't respect them?

--Brad Wilmouth is a news analyst at the Media Research Center. Click here to follow Brad Wilmouth on Twitter.