ABC Plugs Gay Marriage as Economic Stimulus, ‘Former Republican’ Bloomberg Lectures GOP

 On Sunday’s World News, ABC correspondent T.J. Winick filed a report in which he presented same-sex marriage as a way to stimulate the ailing economy - potentially of the entire nation - by getting lots of new married couples to spend money on weddings.   Winick also featured a soundbite of New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg criticizing Republicans for opposing same-sex marriage.

And, as Christiane Amanpour appeared on the same day’s Good Morning America to plug her interview with Bloomberg on This Week, she showed a similar soundbite after GMA co-host Bianna Golodryga brought up Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann’s views on homosexuality.

On World News, after anchor David Muir introduced the report by referring to the legalization of same-sex marriage in New York state as a "money maker," correspondent Winick soon elaborated:

It all means millions of dollars in state revenue at a time when New York needs it most. Gay marriage is expected to bring in $391 million to New York over the next three years. And if gay marriage was legalized nationwide, it's estimated it would add $9.5 billion a year to the economy. Business is already booming at City Cakes in Manhattan.

Winick then gave New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg - currently an independent - an unchallenged soundbite to criticize the Republican Party for not supporting gay marriage. Without noting that Bloomberg had originally been a Democrat - before turning Republican and then independent - the ABC correspondent bolstered the New York mayor’s criticism of the GOP by labeling him as a "former Republican":

T.J. WINICK: Along with the governor, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg lobbied for same-sex marriage. Bloomberg - a former Republican - says the party's stance against same-sex marriage is at odds with the GOP philosophy of personal freedom.

MICHAEL BLOOMBERG, NEW YORK CITY MAYOR: They want the government out of your personal life - government should not tell you who you can marry. And they think that marriage is a stabilizing influence on society and they value the sanctity of marriage.

Sunday’s Good Morning America showed the same soundbite earlier that day when This Week host Christiane Amanpour appeared to preview her interview with the mayor. Co-anchor Bianna Golodryga brought up comments that Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann had made about homosexuality, setting up Amanpour to show her clip of Bloomberg lecturing the GOP. Golodryga:

You asked him about Michele Bachmann's past comments about homosexuality calling it, quote, "personal bondage, despair and enslavement," even comparing it to Satan. What did Mayor Bloomberg have to say about that?

Amanpour gave Bloomberg’s view before showing the clip. Amanpour:

I did ask them in that context, and he basically said this is a trend that's going to be growing, people's ideas on this issue are evolving around the country, and in the not too distant future, he predicted that people will turn around and say, well, what was all the fuss about? But in specific reference to what Michele Bachmann is quoted to have said in the past, this is his response.

Golodryga concluded the segment by bringing up the economic impact of the increase in weddings: "And it's interesting, as a prominent businessman, he also thinks it will do a lot to help the bottom line in New York state, as well."

Below are transcripts of relevant portions of the Sunday, July 24, World News on ABC, followed by the same day’s Good Morning America on ABC:

#From World News:

DAVID MUIR: Across New York state today, they were lining up at the altar, the first day same-sex marriage became legal, a milestone in the gay rights movement, and apparently a money maker, too. Here's ABC’s T.J. Winnick.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: I now pronounce you legally married.

T.J. WINICK: It began at midnight when the law took effect in that classic wedding destination, Niagara Falls. Across New York state today, thousands of same-sex couples said, "I do."

UNIDENTIFIED GIRL: I'm glad that my parents are getting married.

WINICK: Robyn and Karin Cook are long-time partners and parents.

KARIN COOK: We’ve always felt married in our hearts, and that’s certainly the way our children experience our family.

WINICK: There are over 800 same-sex couples getting married in New York City alone today, and it’s projected 21,000 same-sex couples will tie the knot statewide over the next three years. It all means millions of dollars in state revenue at a time when New York needs it most. Gay marriage is expected to bring in $391 million to New York over the next three years. And if gay marriage was legalized nationwide, it’s estimated it would add $9.5 billion a year to the economy. Business is already booming at City Cakes in Manhattan.

MARC MATTHIAS, CITY CAKES CO-OWNER: We're anticipating probably about a 30 percent growth in our overall business.

WINICK: Along with the governor, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg lobbied for same sex marriage. Bloomberg - a former Republican - says the party’s stance against same-sex marriage is at odds with the GOP philosophy of personal freedom.

MICHAEL BLOOMBERG, NEW YORK CITY MAYOR: They want the government out of your personal life - government should not tell you who you can marry. And they think that marriage is a stabilizing influence on society and they value the sanctity of marriage.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: You may seal your vows with a kiss.

WINICK: New York is the biggest state yet to approve gay marriage, but 41 states still ban it. So, while the political battle is not over, today was a day for thousands to declare a very personal victory. T.J. Winick, ABC News, New York.

 #From Good Morning America:

  BIANNA GOLODRYGA: I do want to talk about one of the other issues you're going to be focusing on. That is gay marriage, the first gay weddings took place at midnight in New York state, and you’re going to be sitting down with New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, a proponent of gay marriage. You asked him about Michele Bachmann's past comments about homosexuality calling it, quote, "personal bondage, despair and enslavement," even comparing it to Satan. What did Mayor Bloomberg have to say about that?

CHRISTIANE AMANPOUR: Well, of course, I talked to him, and he is going to be marrying a pair of his aides. And I did ask them in that context, and he basically said this is a trend that's going to be growing, people's ideas on this issue are evolving around the country, and in the not too distant future, he predicted that people will turn around and say, well, what was all the fuss about? But in specific reference to what Michele Bachmann is quoted to have said in the past, this is his response:

MICHAEL BLOOMBERG, NEW YORK CITY MAYOR: The values that she espouses, that the Republican Party espouses are exactly the values that should be promoting this. They want the government out of your personal life, the government should not tell you who you can marry, and they think that marriage is a stabilizing influence on society, and they value the sanctity of marriage, and here are two people who want to get married.

AMANPOUR: So that was what he was saying, and also I asked was he worried and were the couple who he's marrying worried about a potential backlash, and they said, no, because they said look at the polls in the United States, look at young people, a majority of them have really evolved their views and are on board on this issue.

GOLODRYGA: And it's interesting, as a prominent businessman, he also thinks it will do a lot to help the bottom line in New York state, as well. We're looking forward to seeing the rest of the show.