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By Mark Finkelstein | October 31, 2014 | 7:24 AM EDT

Did the editor of Politico's Daily Digest notice that the arrangement of the two top stories this morning played directly into the Dem playbook?  We sure did.

The first headline is "Democratic donors prepare for disappointment," and the sub-headline reads "The plan is to shift focus to 2016, when Democrats face a much more hospitable Senate map."  And sure enough, Politico's very next story obliges Dem desires.   The headline: "Why a GOP Senate could be short-lived," and the sub-headline reads "A half-dozen blue-state Republicans could be in trouble during the 2016 elections."

By Tim Graham | October 31, 2014 | 7:23 AM EDT

Ed Morrissey at Hot Air ably announced that liberal reporters and analysts are breaking out the latest spin – that victory will be terrible for Republicans. I’d call it the Mary Tillotson special: after the GOP took the house in 1994, CNN’s Tillotson suggested this 52-seat landslide was bad news for 1996.

Morrissey calls it “the media’s Sour Grapes Index, in which analysts posit that a big win is really a loss, or that a loss is really a big win.” Alexander Bolton at The Hill offers the classic take, “Civil war looms for the GOP":

By Tom Johnson | October 31, 2014 | 1:14 AM EDT

The Esquire blogger Charles Pierce says Elizabeth Warren’s economic message is popular, but, for reasons that include a Republican “campaign of vandalism” and Democratic ineptitude, she doesn’t get the credit she deserves for it.

By Clay Waters | October 31, 2014 | 12:23 AM EDT

James Taranto's Opinion Journal page features a long-running gag, "Fox Butterfield, Is That You?" an homage to former New York Times crime reporter Fox Butterfield, who wrote an article under a now-notorious headline: "Crime Rates are Falling, but Prisons Keep on Filling." Yet the paper's liberal confusion had a straightforward explanation: Crime was down at least partially because more criminals were locked in prison. Now Taranto has struck again.

By Tom Blumer | October 30, 2014 | 11:51 PM EDT

An unbylined "Q&A" column at the Associated Press yesterday began with the following false declaration: "The $4 trillion experiment is over." That just isn't so.

Maybe the Federal Reserve is done building up its debt holdings — that is by no means certain — but the "experiment" known as "quantitative easing," or "QE," won't be over until the Fed fully unwinds those balances. In the meantime, it has unwarranted leverage over the stock and bond markets. Fed Chair Janet Yellen has what appears to be a de facto veto over Washington policies she doesn't like should she decide to use her leverage in that manner. The rest of the AP item wasn't much better, particularly how it wormed around the reality that if the Fed wishes to avoid winding down its balances, it's going to have to keep buying Treasury and mortgage-backed securities as current holding mature:

By Curtis Houck | October 30, 2014 | 11:37 PM EDT

On Thursday’s NBC Nightly News, Louisiana Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu told NBC News political director and Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd that President Barack Obama is unpopular in the South because the region “has not always been the friendliest place for African-Americans” and thus “[i]t’s been a difficult time for the President to present himself in a very positive light as a leader.”

Prior to Landrieu’s remarks, Todd emphasized that the one thing he learned while on a bus tour meeting voters was “that the most omnipresent person on the campaign trail is somebody you don't see on the campaign trail” in President Barack Obama.

By Curtis Houck | October 30, 2014 | 10:14 PM EDT

The broadcast network blackout of Hillary Clinton telling an audience that corporations and businesses don’t create jobs ended on Thursday night as the CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley brought it up during a segment that continued the liberal media’s hammering of New Jersey Republican Governor Chris Christie for confronting a heckler at an event on Wednesday. While CBS deserves some credit for finally mentioning this, they just as easily lost it when anchor Scott Pelley and CBS News political director John Dickerson rationalized away what she said as an attempt to please the Democratic base.

By Randy Hall | October 30, 2014 | 7:31 PM EDT

With less than a week to go before the midterm elections arrive, David Firestone -- a member of the New York Times Editorial Board -- vented his anger in an attempt to diminish the influence the National Rifle Association has on the political process.

In an article entitled “The NRA's Instant Classic Attack Ads,” Firestone accused the national organization of producing false advertisements as part of its role as the “grand master” of fear, “which thrives on putting guns in nervous hands.”

By Tom Blumer | October 30, 2014 | 6:03 PM EDT

At NewsBusters yesterday, P.J. Gladnick justifiably went after the over-the-top hackery pervading Alexander Burns's Politico story on how "Scott Walker limps toward 2016." Burns bitterly criticized Walker's "divide-and-conquer strategy," and the governor himself as "confrontational" and (of course) "polarizing."

Given that his column was allegedly updated this morning, I expected Burns to revise his writeup to react to two recent newsworthy campaign developments. Incredibly, he didn't mention either.

By Curtis Houck | October 30, 2014 | 5:49 PM EDT

As of Thursday morning, both ABC and NBC have ignored the latest rift in the relationship between the United States and Israel as “a senior Obama administration official” told Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was nothing more than a “coward” and "chickens***." 

Both the Wednesday evening and Thursday morning newscasts on ABC and NBC made no mention of this story, which further cements the chilly reception Netanyahu and President Obama have had for each other throughout Obama’s presidency. 

By Kyle Drennen | October 30, 2014 | 5:41 PM EDT

In the only full report on the upcoming midterm election on Thursday's NBC Today, correspondent Gabe Gutierrez shared his journey aboard the "Pot Bus" in Florida, a campaign effort urging voters to back legalized medical marijuana in the state: "...supporters say that they've made about 200 stops over the past few months to rally support....It's a ride full of high hopes."

By Ken Shepherd | October 30, 2014 | 5:32 PM EDT

David Freedlander of the Daily Beast just doesn't get it. Gov. Dannel Malloy (D-Conn.) is the Left's "dream governor," pushing through "higher taxes on the rich....  [a] state earned income tax credit for the poor...higher minimum wage" and a laundry list of other "progressive" agenda items like "mandatory paid sick leave, repeal of the death penalty, more liberal marijuana laws, easier ballot access, a transgender rights bill, strict new gun control laws, and massive new spending on public education, higher education, and infrastructure."

So then, "Why isn’t Connecticut grateful?" Why is Dannel Malloy on the Democratic governors endangered species list this November?

By Mark Finkelstein | October 30, 2014 | 5:26 PM EDT

Could this be the most cynical statement of the campaign season?  The woman whose recent wedding President Obama attended is okay with stoking the racial fears of black Americans—if that's what it takes to drive them to the polls and secure Dem victories. Alex Wagner devoted a segment of her MSNBC show today to the naked appeals to the racial fears of black Americans that Democrats are making in campaign ads.  Wagner discussed Dem ads that seek to stoke black fear toward Republicans by invoking Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown.

You might think Wagner would have condemned these ugly tactics, explicitly aimed at driving Americans apart based on their race.  Think again. To the contrary, Wagner concluded the segment by saying that it shouldn't have to be the kind of threats contained in these ads that get people to vote, "but if it does, so much stronger the party is for it."

By Matthew Balan | October 30, 2014 | 4:19 PM EDT

Don Lemon surprisingly brought on a Catholic seminarian on Thursday's CNN Tonight for his take on cancer patient turned euthanasia advocate Brittany Maynard's controversial plan to kill herself. Philip Johnson, who, like Maynard, is afflicted by a terminal brain tumor, recently published an open letter to his fellow cancer patient – calling on her to cancel her suicide plans and "fight this disease," so that she can be an "inspiration to countless others in her situation."

By Katie Yoder | October 30, 2014 | 3:56 PM EDT

The feminist media claim they’re all for what’s best for women – and their choices. But are they? Take the quiz below to discover their scariest tactics.