Latest Posts

By Tim Graham | | August 22, 2016 | 1:06 PM EDT

If it’s Sunday, The Washington Post is imagining President Trump as an authoritarian dictator. A few weeks ago, the Sunday Outlook section compared Trump to fictional dictators. Yesterday, the Sunday Arts section gave Philip Kennicott a huge 2,000-word space for his own fictional-dictator scenario: imagining how Trump would ruin artistic free expression if he wins in November.

By Curtis Houck | | August 22, 2016 | 12:38 PM EDT

While Donald Trump was hate-tweeting on Monday morning about Morning Joe and the gossip site rumors surrounding co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough, the latter co-host prided himself as being a Trump critic (he wasn’t) but more importantly called out the Obama administration and government for collectively having “blood on our hands” for the inaction in Syria’s civil war to, in part, preserve the Iran nuclear deal. 

By Scott Whitlock | | August 22, 2016 | 12:24 PM EDT

CBS This Morning on Monday eagerly hyped a new expose by the Washington Post: As a child, Donald Trump pulled pigtails and threw rocks at kids. This is the same Washington Post that went after Mitt Romney for allegedly forcing a haircut on another boy in 1965. Talking to reporters Marc Fisher and Michael Kranish, CBS co-host Norah O’Donnell wondered, “You go all the way back to his childhood to help reveal some of Donald Trump. What did you learn?” 

By Brad Wilmouth | | August 22, 2016 | 11:38 AM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Sunday's CNN Newsroom with Poppy Harlow, CNN political commentator and New York Times columnist Charles Blow became the latest example of liberals accusing Republicans of racism when they talk about helping black Americans solve problems that they are disproportionately affected by, as he asserted that recent efforts by the Donald Trump campaign at "outreach" to blacks are just an excuse for the GOP candidate to speak negatively about blacks in front of white audiences.

After declaring that "This is just a backhanded way of criticizing black people in front of white people," leading host Harlow to bring up a clip of CNN political commentator Ryan Lizza suggesting that the Trump campaign was just trying to convince college-educated white Republicans that he is not racist, Blow reiterated his charge as he responded: "There may be something to that. I think it's worse than that, though. I do think that it is a backhanded way of criticizing black people in front of white people."

By Kyle Drennen | | August 22, 2016 | 11:27 AM EDT

Talking to longtime Democratic strategist and Clinton operative James Carville on Monday’s NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer fretted that Donald Trump visiting the flood zone in Louisiana could give him an edge in the presidential race: “He goes down there, looks at the damage first hand, talks to people, before President Obama. It wasn’t until after his visit that Hillary Clinton picked up the phone, called the governor there. Did he appear more presidential in the wake of that tragedy than Hillary Clinton?”

By Jorge Bonilla | | August 22, 2016 | 8:00 AM EDT

This post was originally going to be written as a "what to expect" sort of pre-analysis to how our domestic Spanish-language news media might react to news of a potential Donald Trump shift on immigration. Of course, that pretty much went out the window once Jorge Ramos logged on to Twitter today.

By Karen Townsend | | August 22, 2016 | 2:14 AM EDT

The star-crossed bipartisan relationship of Democrat staffer Laurel Healy and Republican chief-of-staff Gareth Ritter bombed like a Michael Moore documentary on last night's episode of CBS’s BrainDead.

By Alexa Moutevelis Coombs | | August 22, 2016 | 1:14 AM EDT

It's the eighth episode of the revamped left-wing version of Match Show on ABC and what do we have tonight but the second mention of Donald Trump this season.

By Tim Graham | | August 21, 2016 | 10:57 PM EDT

It was a nightmare for the BBC, as they described it: "An interview by BBC reporter Catrin Nye on Islamophobia has been interrupted by Islamophobia." A passer-by named Paul told Nye’s interviewee Ruqaiya Haris, a Muslim advocate and student: "There's no Sharia law here." Haris wasn’t going to take the interruption sitting down.

But it's a bit funny when the the taxpayer-funded BBC objects to an opposing point of view forcing its way into their tilted conversation.

By Scott Whitlock | | August 21, 2016 | 7:30 PM EDT

The Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza offered up a defensive piece on Thursday explaining “why President Obama isn’t stopping his vacation to visit the Louisiana flooding.” Obama has since reversed course and said he would visit, but the Cillizza dismissed the attacks against the President, condescendingly explaining, “Cue outrage.” The Post, however, is the same paper that called George W. Bush’s Hurricane Katrina flyover to be the second “worst” moment of George W. Bush’s presidency. 

By Brad Wilmouth | | August 21, 2016 | 5:15 PM EDT

Substituting for allegedly right-leaning columnist David Brooks on Friday's PBS NewsHour, Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin repeated a smear from the left against Breitbart News linking the conservative group and its former executive chairman, Steve Bannon, to "very anti-Semitic and anti-minority" sentiments as she responded negatively to Donald Trump's choice of Bannon as his new campaign CEO.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | | August 21, 2016 | 4:34 PM EDT

On Sunday’s Reliable Sources CNN’s Brian Stelter brought up a serious issue for journalists,Hillary Clinton's major lack of press conferences. He brought on NPR’s White House Correspondent Tamara Keith to discuss the importance of pressers. “So with a press conference, you can pull out more information, or you can -- or it will be more clear that the candidate simply isn't answering,” she explained. But Stelter was more interested with Clinton’s health conspiracies than say a real issue, such as the e-mail scandal.

By Clay Waters | | August 21, 2016 | 2:41 PM EDT

So long, democracy. Larry Wilmore's Comedy Central show got cancelled. That was the dramatic message from the far-left culture magazine Salon, with a headline ripe for ridicule: “Losing ‘The Nightly Show’ matters: Larry Wilmore’s satire was crucial for our democracy,” especially "in the middle of an election cycle where many segments of our society feel totally disenfranchised, if not outright persecuted." Lest you think the headline was clickbait, the piece by Sophia A. McClennen, a professor at Penn State, face-planted right out of the starting gate with the same magnificent exaggeration: "This week saw the end of one of the most significant satire news shows in our nation’s history. "

By Tom Johnson | | August 21, 2016 | 1:54 PM EDT

Once upon a time, the right had (some) reason to complain about media bias, acknowledges Talking Points Memo’s Josh Marshall, but these days, not so much. According to Marshall, when conservatives back in the day “went about creating their own counter-establishment,” what they built wasn’t a normal mirror image, but a funhouse-mirror image. For example, "Fox News [was] the supposed antidote to the 'liberal media'. Of course, Fox is 'conservative' in a way that the mid-century elite media simply never was. And with generations of ref-playing what had been a vaguely establishment liberal national press ceased almost entirely to be so."

By Tim Graham | | August 21, 2016 | 12:23 PM EDT

Sunday’s Washington Post Magazine has two cover stories, one for Bill Clinton and one (if you turn it upside down on the other side) for Melania Trump. As expected, Bill Clinton is going to get a gushier treatment. Post writer Neely Tucker is so tender to the president that he mangles a fact, and the copy editors (also tender hearts) allowed it. “Fact Checker” Glenn Kessler will not be assigned to this story.

Tucker wrote, “He allegedly cheated on his wife, repeatedly, even in the Oval Office, and with a young woman who wasn’t that much older than their daughter.”