Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog,, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer
June 13, 2016, 6:05 PM EDT

In his second speech on Sunday morning's terrorist massacre in Orlando, Florida, President Barack Obama said on Monday that "the shooter was inspired by various extremist information that was disseminated over the Internet," that "we see no clear evidence that he was directed externally," and that "this is certainly an example of the kind of homegrown extremism that all of us have been so concerned about for a very long time."

The press, led as usual by the Associated Press, is certainly cooperating with those characterizations. Presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has clearly made up her mind that Omar Mateen committed a "lone wolf" attack, and that banning "assault weapons" would somehow prevent future such attacks. The problem, of course, is what one means by "homegrown" and "directed."

June 12, 2016, 5:50 PM EDT

Imam Muhammad Musri, the president and senior imam of the Islamic Society of Central Florida, made a statement to reporters Sunday morning at 10:32 a.m. Eastern Time.

Jim Hoft at Gateway Pundit reports that "This was the first press conference held by Orlando officials after the massacre," and that "No Christian or Jewish leaders were invited to speak to reporters." Curious reporters, assuming there are still any out there, should wonder, if religious beliefs had nothing to do with Omar Mateen's terrorist killing spree, why a representative from just one religion would be present to comment.

June 12, 2016, 12:13 PM EDT

Hours after this morning's massacre in Orlando, Florida, the Associated Press is already brandishing the gun-control agenda.

In a report with a time stamp of 9:16 a.m. Eastern Time, the AP, with its list apparently always at the ready, gave the following headline to its rundown of "some of the nation's deadliest rampages since 2012": "Florida nightclub attack just the latest US mass shooting." In other words, Dear Reader, while we're busy minimizing the larger significance of the massacre, we want to make sure you understand that events such as these will continue to occur as long as guns are available.

June 9, 2016, 11:54 PM EDT

Another major employer has decided to join the long list of companies moving jobs from California to more business-friendly states. This time, it's $12 billion titan Jacobs Engineering, which is moving its "corporate operations," almost definitely meaning its headquarters, from Pasadena to Dallas, Texas. Press reaction, especially outside of business-oriented outlets, has ranged from nonexistent to muted to, in the case of the Los Angeles Times, a bit snarky.

June 9, 2016, 12:53 PM EDT

In news which appears to have first become known to the general public at the Financial Times on Wednesday, research done by Goldman Sachs indicates that the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, has led to more involuntary part-time employment — something which the Act's proponents claimed is something that wouldn't happen, and still insist hasn't happened. How much more? According to the Times, "The New York investment bank reckons “a few hundred thousand workers might be working part-time involuntarily” as a result of the legislation’s employer mandate."

June 9, 2016, 6:21 AM EDT

Until very recently, those of us who follow the routine instances of journalistic malfeasance committed at the Associated Press only thought that its writers are so enamored of the idea of a Hillary Clinton presidency that they simply accept her campaign's spin as the gospel truth and willingly dress it up as "objective news."

That's obviously bad enough. But Monday night, that all changed for the worse — and in the following days, it has became even more obvious. It is now eminently reasonable to believe that the wire service has been proactively involved in real time in advancing and even planning the Clinton campaign's strategies and tactics — essentially serving her as a stenographer, like the Soviet Union's old Pravda.

June 8, 2016, 12:12 PM EDT

If we're to believe the pose struck by five Associated Press reporters who contributed to a Sunday afternoon story on the topic, the spike in violent crime in the U.S. during the past nearly two years apparently needs its own episode of the old Unsolved Mysteries TV series.

"Experts can't point to a single reason" for the rise. The increase "is stumping law enforcement officials." FBI Director James Comey says, "I don't know what the answer is." But don't worry, say the AP reporters, because "the jump isn't enough to suggest there's a trend," and "it's a far cry from the more notorious early 1990s." The obvious genuine answer, the one which people who don't have blinders on clearly recognize, known as the "Ferguson effect," got scant notice, and wasn't directly named. It's almost as if the wire service has a Stylebook rule against using the term — and especially against recognizing the effect's legitimacy.

June 6, 2016, 11:59 PM EDT

Taking a cue from the Associated Press's Martin Crutsinger in March of last year, two Los Angeles Times reporters told readers on Monday that the economy is about to complete a seventh year of expansion. No it's not, at least not if historical benchmarks for determining expansions are consistently and properly heeded.

Reporters Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee couldn't even keep their own standards for expansion straight, as seen in this damning sentence: "The economy has been growing for 84 months, a stretch that is well above the 58-month average post-World War II expansion." No it hasn't, and no it isn't.

June 6, 2016, 12:04 AM EDT

In a remarkable "Who do they think they're kidding?" exercise seen on Thursday, a New York Times editorial cited the findings of a Federal Reserve study released in late May showing that 76 millions are, in the Fed's words, "struggling to get by" or "just getting by."

Gosh, I wonder why? The Times apparently wants readers to believe that these conditions couldn't possibly have anything to do with the fiscal and regulatory policies of the Obama administration, even though, last time I checked, it has been in charge of these areas during the past 7-1/2 years. Neither Barack Obama's name nor any reference to his administration are present in the editorial.

June 4, 2016, 9:03 PM EDT

Philip Bump and the Washington Post have apparently had a couple of pretty bad days. The Post had to endure having to cover, and cover for, an absolutely awful jobs report released Friday morning. That news made their beloved Dear Leader, who had just celebrated the allegedly wonderful economic accomplishments seen during his presidency on Wednesday, look quite foolish. Never fear: By Paragraph 4 of its related story, the Post found an "expert" who claimed that "This just does not square with all the other things we’re seeing in the economy." Actually, the job market has been virtually the only exception to otherwise uniformly weak data since the fourth quarter of last year.

Perhaps partially influenced by the bad jobs news, Bump, who toils at the Post's "The Fix" blog, came completely unhinged in reacting to a Thursday evening retweet by presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

June 3, 2016, 10:51 PM EDT

A Pew Research report published three weeks ago on America’s Shrinking Middle Class presented a fundamentally misleading narrative which the press was only too eager to relay and continues to use, namely that the middle class has been seriously shrinking since the turn of the century. Christopher Rugaber at the Associated Press typified the initial press coverage, writing: "In nearly one-quarter of metro areas, middle-class adults no longer make up a majority ... That sharp shift reflects a broader erosion that occurred from 2000 through 2014."

The not particularly subtle message: "It all started with George W. Bush, and it hasn't let up since then." This post will disprove and thus discredit that notion.

June 2, 2016, 9:13 AM EDT

Demonstrating a remarkable ability to ignore the obvious, Anne Gearan at the Washington Post, covering plans by Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton to deliver "a major foreign policy address" on Thursday, wrote that "National-security issues offer Clinton a way to play up her experience in contrast to (Donald) Trump."

To make that laugh-out-loud clause appear credible, Gearan, the Post's "chief Hillary booster," purged any reference to the long list of national security and foreign policy negatives in Mrs. Clinton's resume. Thus, at least the following words and terms relating to Mrs. Clinton's actual "experience" did not appear in her story: "email," "server," "classified," "inspector general," "Libya," "Syria," "Russia," "Iraq" — or even "Obama." In fact, though it is in an accompanying photo caption, Gearan's actual story never used the term "Secretary of State."

May 30, 2016, 7:37 AM EDT

On Saturday morning, Tom Johnson at NewsBusters called attention to how Paul Waldman at The Week recently crowed about the Obama administration's supposedly scandal-free record consisting of "only piddling little scandalettes." 

Waldman's fever-swamp take is made even more hilarious by the fact that he considers George W. Bush's "selling of the Iraq War" a genuine scandal. But somehow, President Barack Obama's selling of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare — where even the reflexively leftist evaluators at Politifact labeled his core "If you like your plan, you can keep your plan" promise the Lie of the Year in 2013 — must not be a scandal, or is at worst a "piddling little scandalette."

May 29, 2016, 10:24 PM EDT

On Fox News Sunday, in a segment comparing statements in the State Department Inspector General's report with claims Hillary Clinton has made about her emails and use of a home-brew private server while she was Secretary of State, host Chris Wallace had to endure Democratic Congressman Adam Schiff's obsessive insistence on bringing up former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who left office over 11 years ago, at seemingly every turn.

At one point in the Sunday morning segment, Wallace said, twice: "We’re done with Colin Powell," and then told Schiff that "I would expect more from you," clearly meaning, "I expected better." But then, after quoting a section of the IG's report noting that Powell was interviewed, while Mrs. Clinton, despite public assurances to the contrary, refused to cooperate with the investigation, Schiff basically said, "Aha, you brought up Powell!" Wallace's final comeback was priceless: "You know what? I’m not going to vote for Colin Powell for president this time." He did not give Schiff a chance to speak again — nor should he have.

May 27, 2016, 9:25 AM EDT

Those poor, naive folks who have been expecting a mea culpa from Katie Couric for the deceptive insertion into her Under the Gun documentary of a long silence following a question directed at Virginia gun-rights supporters will be disappointed at what has transpired since the controversy arose.

As of Thursday afternoon, no one was genuinely apologizing for anything. Stephanie Soechtig, the film’s producer, employed a tired "I apologize if anyone was offended, but I didn't mean any harm" excuse — garbage which the Washington Post's Erik Wemple, as Tim Graham at NewsBusters noted, should cause anyone using it to lose "their standing as professionals." For her part, Couric issued a statement saying “I support Stephanie’s statement and am very proud of the film.” Early Thursday evening, however, Couric appeared to move into damage-control mode, but in a way that should forever earn her the nickname "Katie Coward."

May 27, 2016, 8:47 AM EDT

Wednesday evening, Bill O Reilly at Fox News sharply criticized the Black Lives Matter movement, assigning it primary blame for the spike in violent urban crime seen throughout the nation since late 2014.

Though his monologue contained one significant exaggeration, his overall take — expressed in layman's terms, that the "Ferguson effect" is real — was spot-on. Leftists, up to and including President Obama, with the full cooperation of a sympathetic establishment press, have denied the linkage between the orchestrated attempt begun in Ferguson, Missouri in August 2014 to embed into the nation's consciousness the false idea that police are on a mission to gun down innocent black youths and the rising crime levels which have since arisen in so many of the nation's cities. O'Reilly also sharply rebuked the press, which has been far too quick to downplay the serious increase in urban crime and to ignore the violent records and actions of BLM and its leaders.

May 24, 2016, 11:43 AM EDT

Seldom have there been more clear-cut examples of bias than those found in Juliet Linderman's Associated Press story yesterday on the acquittal of Baltimore Police Officer Edward Nero on all charges relating to the death of Freddie Gray last year.

The first half of Linderman's first sentence reads: "Prosecutors failed for the second time in their bid to hold Baltimore police accountable for the arrest and death of Freddie Gray." We're sorry you're so obviously disappointed, Juliet, but the fact is that the judge in the case, by rendering not-guilty verdicts, concluded that Nero was not legally accountable for the death of Freddie Gray. The AP reporter's opening presupposes that any failure to convict Nero or other officers involved automatically means that the justice system has failed.

May 23, 2016, 2:29 PM EDT

Liberal interviewers are quick to question reasonable but somehow "controversial" assertions made by Republicans and conservatives, while loony statements uttered by leftist interview subjects often slide right on by without challenge.

On Tuesday, MSNBC host Thomas Roberts heard Bernie Sanders delegate Angie Morelli claim that single-payer health insurance might "help those people out" who made "death threats" against Democratic Party officials after Nevada's contentious delegate selection process last week. Instead of bursting out in laughter or questioning Morelli as to how she could possibly believe what she had just said, Roberts wrapped up the segment as if she had just made a perfectly reasonable statement.

May 23, 2016, 10:51 AM EDT

In what he should have recognized as damning self-criticism, Chris Matthews admitted to MSNBC's infamous self-promoting fabulist Brian Williams Friday afternoon that the establishment news media is "not representative of the country," especially in regards to how the U.S. is "uniquely pro-gun as a country."

But those who observe the Hardball host's choice of words, his demeanor, and his tone of voice will detect the predictable condescension of the smug media elites, specifically that the rubes outside of New York, Washington and L.A don't possess "the usual sophistication we’re used to" or the "cosmopolitan attitude we all share."

May 22, 2016, 11:07 PM EDT

On Tuesday at, 2015 Noel Sheppard Blogger of the Year recipient Mollie Hemingway pointed to several outrageous examples of poor press coverage of the Supreme Court's unanimous move to send Obamacare's HHS contraception mandate case back to the lower courts.

Hemingway's core observation was that usually plaintiff-sympathetic establishment press outlets "suddenly have trouble even naming the Little Sisters of the Poor" until their stories' very late paragraphs. She even found that Adam Liptak's story at the New York Times, one of the establishment press's two primary gatekeepers, failed to mention the Little Sisters at all in a 1,283-word report. One item she did not cite was at the Associated Press, the other primary gatekeeper, where the coverage was in some respects even worse.