Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer
September 29, 2014, 9:41 PM EDT

Early voting in Ohio was supposed to start tomorrow, a full 35 days before Election Day. But today, the U.S. Supreme Court, by a 5-4 majority allowed the state to carry out voting law as passed by the legislature instead of what a group of misnamed "civil rights" groups wanted.

The final paragraph of Ann Sanner's Associated Press coverage of the ruling illustrated how absurd this controversy has become. It related to the lower court ruling the Supremes reversed, and showed that to so many members of the press and public, world history apparently started less than a decade ago.

September 29, 2014, 3:07 PM EDT

Democratic State Representative Christina Ayala has been arrested and charged with 19 felony charges of voter fraud. Eight of the counts are for fraudulent voting. Other Ayala family members are under investigation, and criminal charges have been recommended but not made against one of them.

The press is letting Connecticut's Secretary of State claim that the Ayala prosecution proves that the Nutmeg State's elections system works, even though the charges go back to elections held as far back as five years. Why are we supposed to be impressed?

September 29, 2014, 1:45 PM EDT

According to a poll which is described as the state's "gold standard," Republican U.S. Senate candidate Joni Ernst now leads Bruce Braley, her Democratic Party opponent, in the Iowa U.S. Senate race for the seat being vacated by Democrat Tom Harkin.

The Des Moines Register's "Iowa poll" has Ernst up by a six-point margin, 44% - 38%. That Ernst's lead isn't larger is apparently attributable to a statement she made to the Register's editorial board which has been treated as a misstep, but really wasn't. The truth is that the statement Ernst made — that she had "reason to believe there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq" — really wasn't strong enough.

September 29, 2014, 10:16 AM EDT

As I noted Sunday evening, Fox News's Megyn Kelly, on her Friday show, characterized the beheading of Colleen Hufford at the hands of Alton Nolen, if true, as "the first American beheading on American soil reportedly in the name of jihad."

It turns out that someone allegedly tried to beat Nolen out for that distinction, and failed. Take a look at what the Oklahoman's Nolan Clay described as a "bizarre coincidence" in a Friday report (HT Ed Driscoll; excerpted nearly in full because of the story's importance and the paper's subscription wall; bolds and numbered tags are mine):

September 28, 2014, 11:10 PM EDT

National Journal’s Ron Fournier was apparently among those who endured President Obama's appearance on "60 Minutes" this evening.

Fournier was able to succinctly summarize the contents of Obama's interview with Steve Kroft, the network's designated softball pitcher, in a tweet appearing shortly after its conclusion (HT Twitchy):

September 28, 2014, 8:38 PM EDT

The story of alleged Moore, Oklahoma murderer Alton Nolen, who reportedly beheaded co-worker Colleen Hufford, is fading from the headlines. Barring further developments, I don't expect it to be a news topic on any of the Big Three networks' morning or evening news shows tomorrow.

That's because it has already disappeared from prominence at the Associated Press. At 10:20 this morning, the latest story on Nolen had already dropped to Number 6 on the AP's top list of U.S. stories. By 5:30 p.m., it was gone. The top story at 5:30 was oh so predictably about Ferguson, Missouri. The "big news": a police officer was shot in the arm, and "was treated and released from a hospital."

September 28, 2014, 9:41 AM EDT

During the Trayvon Martin-George Zimmerman saga, the press was widely and deservedly criticized for repeatedly and almost exclusively using a photo of Martin as an innocent-looking 13 year-old over others more recently taken which were readily available.

Perhaps they're at it again with alleged murderer Alton Nolen. On Saturday morning, the Associated Press described Nolen as having "beheaded a woman with a knife and was attacking another worker when he was shot and wounded by a company official." Photos of Nolen from 2013, 2011 and 2010 have accompanied press reports, while the one which will be seen after the jump from Nolen's own Facebook page just three weeks ago has been absent (HT to an emailer):

September 27, 2014, 9:31 AM EDT

The establishment press, and now apparently the FBI, have a problem on their hands: an alleged killer who converted to Islam; expressed sentiments favored by terrorists; killed a woman by employing terrorists' favored method, i.e., beheading; shouted Islamic slogans while carrying out his evil deed; and was trying to kill someone else when another armed person shot and wounded him.

Their problem is that political correctness demands that they try to convince the public that Alton Nolen's deeds weren't linked to terrorism, and that they weren't even terrorist in nature.

September 26, 2014, 11:30 PM EDT

Debbie has been caught doing it again.

Early this month, Democratic National Committe Chairmwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz went after Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, claiming that he "has given women the back of his hand," and that "Republican tea party extremists like Scott Walker are ... grabbing us by the hair and pulling us back." I wrote at the time that Wasserman-Schultz's supposed "walkback" was not genuine. The Washington Free Beacon has corroborated that suspicion, reporting, with video support seen after the jump, that the Badger State incident was not the first time she used the language of domestic violence to smear a Republican officeholder:

September 26, 2014, 10:05 PM EDT

It wasn't that long ago that Obamacare defenders were ridiculing those of us who pointed out that the fully loaded cost of HealthCare.gov would surely top the $1 billion mark.

Well, we were wrong — to be so conservative. The real number is "about" $2.1 billion and counting, according to a Bloomberg report which is mostly being kept out of the non-business press.

September 26, 2014, 1:22 PM EDT

USA Today, gave the equivalent of almost a full page to Eric Holder's resignation in Friday's print edition.

The paper's primary story by Gregory Korte, at the top right of the front page, described him as having "championed gay, civil, voting rights." The item's continuation on Page 8A included a quote from Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Campaign, which calls itself "America's largest civil rights organization working to achieve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality." Griffin called Hold "our Robert Kennedy." How odd, given that Michael Lind's 2000 book on RFK described him as "prudish and homophobic." That's what happens when you grow up learning airbrushed history, Chad. The paper's second story went into puffery by describing how "Holder Took Work as AG Personally." Excerpts from each follow the jump.

September 24, 2014, 9:43 PM EDT

The Politico's Josh Gerstein wants readers not to have a problem with President Barack Obama singing the praises of American exceptionalism when in front of U.S. audiences but deep-sixing it when speaking at the United Nations. Though Obama has almost always avoided actually using the E-word, he has recenlly taken to speaking of this nation's "unique" abilities and capabilities, and for some time has described the U.S. as "the one indispensable nation."

But Gerstein, in his column today, indicated that it's okay that "Obama watered down his noble-America rhetoric" at the U.N. today. Oh, and in the Politico reporter's fantasy world, Obama's back-and-forth foreign policy postures — it's hardly accurate to call them genuine "positions" — are really no different than what we saw under George W. Bush. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds and numbered tags are mine):

September 23, 2014, 11:54 PM EDT

Twitter users happening upon a Monday evening tweet by the Associated Press's Josh Lederman can be forgiven if they thought they were visiting a parody account.

Lederman is a White House reporter for the AP. His LinkedIn profile indicates that his journalism career began about three years ago. His education, up to and including "a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism" after obtaining "a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from The George Washington University," apparently left him woefully short of genuine knowledge of recent U.S. history, as indicated in the tweet which follows the jump (HT Twitchy):

September 23, 2014, 9:18 PM EDT

This morning (at NewsBusters; at BizzyBlog), I noted that Texas Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis's awful performance in Friday's debate with Republican aspirant Greg Abbott was predictably ignored by the Politico, the New York Times, and the Associated Press's national site.

The AP did have a story it apparently limited to distribution within Texas. As I also noted this morning, though it's probably not the case, it would not surprise anyone if we learned the wire service's Paul Weber wrote his story in advance and stayed in his hotel room during the event. That's because his Saturday dispatch was so divorced from reality that it's hard to imagine that he could really have written it based on what he and other viewers actually saw.

September 23, 2014, 10:17 AM EDT

The two major-party Texas gubernatorial candidates, Democrat Wendy Davis and Republican Greg Abbott, debated Friday night. I knew it didn't go well for Davis, once a national media darling, when I searched on "Wendy Davis Abbott debate" (not in quotes) and found no coverage of the event at the Associated Press's national web site, the New York Times and the Politico.

Davis, trailing significantly in the polls, did not acquit herself well. Her most awful moment, seen in the video after the jump, came when she insisted that Abbott, currently Texas's Attorney General, should stop defending the state against an education funding lawsuit, when doing so would violate a law Davis herself supported. After the Republican pointed out that inconvenient fact, Davis lost it, ranting out of turn for a solid 15 seconds, talking over the debate's moderator as he tried to bring the proceedings back to order.

September 22, 2014, 7:08 PM EDT

Politico's Kenneth Vogel and Byron Tau filed a long Friday article moaning about how influential opposition research has become in the conduct of this year's political campaigns. My takeaway is that they really don't like it this time around — not because the money involved has increased, and not because supposedly lax campaign-finance laws have accommodated this increase. No, they're really upset because, according to Joe Pounder, a cofounder of the conservative American Rising, "so far, at least — Democrats had endured more such hits than Republicans."

So I guess the next step for the Politico pair inevitably had to be to minimize the importance of hits against Democrats. Here's their one-sentence evaluation of one of them: "[S]maller scoops have proliferated as well — an Ohio gubernatorial candidate caught driving without a license, for example." You've got to be kidding.

September 21, 2014, 11:46 PM EDT

At Tea Party and conservative events, the press routinely seeks out any shred of evidence of far-right extremism, racism or even uncivil behavior exhibited by attendees. If found, it then tries to portray even one or a few such people out of thousands as somehow typical.

Rallies in support of liberals' pet causes get a completely different treatment. The press almost invariably ignores rampant left-wing extremism clearly on display. Sunday's "Climate March" in New York City, along with other smaller marches in other parts of the world, exemplifies the blatant double standard. The Blaze, Gateway Pundit, and others reported no shortage of Gotham protesters often uncivilly advocating an end to capitalism and its replacement with "a socialist future." The Associated Press and the New York Times ignored it all.

September 20, 2014, 10:48 PM EDT

On Sunday, CBS's "60 Minutes" will broadcast Scott Pelley's recent interview of former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta.

In CBS's promotional tease, which was broadcast on Friday, in response to Pelley's question about whether he was confident that the U.S. troop withdrawal "was the right thing to do" at the time it was done, Panetta said, "No, I wasn't." That's big news. How big? So big that, based on searches on Panetta's last name, the Associated Press and the New York Times have yet to cover it. In other words, it's fair to contend that these two leading icons of American journalism are waiting for an administration response before they run the story, so they can then turn it into a "White House denies" piece. The video follows the jump.

September 20, 2014, 9:37 PM EDT

The real problem with Wisconsin Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mary Burke's "jobs plan," the detailed version of which appears to be no longer available at her campaign's web site, isn't its plagiarized material. It's the content. The presence of certain obviously wrong facts and patently pathetic assertions indicates that Ms. Burke, a successful entrepreneur who one would think should have known better, hardly scrutinized her plan at all before allowing its publication.

Thursday evening, BuzzFeed reported that "Large portions of Wisconsin Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mary Burke’s jobs plan (saved separately by BuzzFeed — Ed.) for Wisconsin appear to be copied directly from the plans of three Democratic candidates who ran for governor in previous election cycles." As would be expected, the Associated Press's Scott Bauer attempted to come to the rescue, finding an "elections expert" who said that "it's not really plagiarism because the person working for her did it." But Bauer also noted that Burke "has no plans to change the material, which she called a small part of the 40-page plan," so criticism of its content remains fair game.

September 19, 2014, 11:23 PM EDT

When White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest made his first Fox News appearance in that role, he may have thought that having Shepard Smith interview him would make the exercise a relative cakewalk.

It didn't happen. Even though Smith, as Matt Sheffield observed last year at NewsBusters, is "not known as any sort of conservative," he was clearly critical of Earnest's breezy claims about the wondrous "coalition" allegedly being assembled to fight ISIS/ISIL without U.S. combat forces, calling it "as the president once put it, something of a fantasy." The video and a transcript of key segments follow the jump.