Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer
March 9, 2016, 4:11 PM EST

Actual sales at the wholesale level in January, as reported today by the Census Bureau, fell sharply from December. That's to be expected. But this time was different — really different, because the drop was to a level lower than January 2012, i.e., four years ago.

Four press outlets which covered today's release either missed (or ignored) this shocking news. They only told readers about what happened with the seasonally adjusted data — which, while still pretty dismal, didn't look quite as awful.

March 8, 2016, 4:37 PM EST

Beginning early in 2014, shortly after its initial disastrous rollout, there has been a virtual blackout on anything resembling negative coverage of the "Affordable Care Act," aka Obamacare.

It hasn't been due to a lack of horror stories: plan cancellations, shocking rate increases, shrunken provider networks, co-ops going out of business, etc. It's because the nation's establishment press has worked mightily to minimize their exposure and to avoid dealing with their larger significance, calling them "glitches," "tricky situations" and the like, while mostly ignoring individual local nightmares. Now several Minnesota residents, clearly kept in the dark until now about something yours truly and several others on the center-right warned of in late 2013, have learned that Obamacare has saddled their children with tens of thousands of dollars in debt.

March 7, 2016, 9:06 PM EST

Since the economy finally began consistently regaining jobs in early 2010, the establishment press has had a consistent, predictable and annoying reporting (and non-reporting) pattern.

It starts with the Friday morning jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics at or near the beginning of the month. Virtually without fail, it has spit out positive and sometimes even very positive seasonally adjusted increases in overall payroll employment (one small exception: the Census hiring season in mid-2010). Later that day, or in some cases a week later, but in either case in the late afternoon when most reporters are thinking about their weekends instead of their jobs, the USDA releases its report on enrollment in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), aka Food Stamps. If you didn't know that the economy was adding jobs, the Food Stamp figures would lead you to believe that it wasn't. Somehow, this is never news.

March 7, 2016, 3:16 PM EST

Score another blow for (allegedly) "unintended consequences."

A proposed 33-page rule applying to investment advisers emanating from the Department of Labor would redefine the fiduciary relationship between investment advisers and their clients investing for retirement, which is the predominant objective of most investors. According to the Wall Street Journal, the rule "could be released as soon as this month." One side effect of the rule is that it could mark the beginning of the end of financial talk radio and TV broadcasts. Since such programs tend to lean center-right (there are exceptions, including Suze Orman), it seems mighty convenient for the government and its regulatory army that the press, particularly the Associated Press, has paid no visible attention to this apparently imminent rule.

March 6, 2016, 11:45 PM EST

Former First Lady Nancy Reagan died today.

The Associated Press's Christopher Weber, in an otherwise predictably passive-aggressive obituary, got one thing right: "The Reagans' mutual devotion over 52 years of marriage was legendary." How nice of him to acknowledge that now. The fact is that while it was visible during Ronald Reagan's presidency, everyone with eyes to see could recognize the special bond Nancy and husband Ron shared — except the condescending New York-Washington press corps, which as Weber noted, gave her "look of such steady adoration" a mocking moniker: "the gaze." Talk about "mean-spirited."

March 6, 2016, 12:15 PM EST

Columbia Journalism professor Dale Maharidge has produced a lengthy lament about the state of print and newsroom journalism, and how hard it's been on those forced out of their jobs. It's present online at The Nation, one of the far-left's flagships, and at BillMoyers.com, the web site of the former Johnson administration press secretary. The delusional Moyers believes that "We have an ideological press that's interested in the election of Republicans."

The title of Maharidge's mournful missive at Moyers' site asks a question: "What Happens to Journalists When No One Wants to Print Their Words Anymore?" The answer, Mr. Maharidge, is that when all of you had the chance, you failed to be reporters, and did so in the name of agenda-driven "journalism." You failed to give the public the basic information it had every right to expect, and in the process frequently demonstrated contempt for your audience. As a result, the public has largely tuned newspapers out, and they're not coming back.

March 5, 2016, 8:27 PM EST

The press is mostly thrilled over yesterday's Employment Situation Summary from the government, which reported that the unemployment rate stayed at 4.9 percent and that the economy added 242,000 seasonally adjusted payroll jobs. President Barack Obama took the opportunity to take what CNBC's Jeff Cox described as "a victory lap ... in Friday remarks to the media."

Well, why not? Obama was secure in the knowledge that the establishment press would mostly play along, even though February's larger number of private-sector workers put in 16 million fewer hours per week and earned $540 million fewer dollars per week than those who were employed in January.

March 3, 2016, 12:59 AM EST

The Washington Post's obsession over Donald Trump is a sight to behold — but not a pretty one.

On Monday, following two week-earlier Trump-demonizing columns, one comparing the billionaire to medieval emperor Charlemagne, and another claiming that Trump's electoral progress thus far had helped her understand "exactly how Hitler could have come to power in Germany," the Post issued a house editorial directly comparing Trump's "assault on democracy" to Hitler's rise to power. In other words, last week's columns were merely appetizers for the paper's institutional assertion that, as far as they're concerned, the "authoritarian" Trump should be rejected because of the likelihood that once in power, he will become another monster like Hitler — or, if we're lucky, only as bad as one of the world's current thug rulers.

March 2, 2016, 2:45 PM EST

To believe what the Associated Press's Tom Krisher and Dee-Ann Durbin wrote yesterday about February's auto sales, you have to believe that last month's car buyers were either: "a) affected with vertigo; dizzy"; or b) "frivolous and lighthearted; impulsive; flighty."

That's because they claimed that in February, "consumers - giddy from Super Bowl ads - returned to showrooms after a snowy January." Good grief.

February 29, 2016, 5:34 PM EST

It appears that there's an effort underway to expand the definition of "deniers" beyond the realm of climate change/"global warming."

Ideally, in leftists' minds, a "denier" would be "anyone who doesn't accept leftist dogma without reservations." That definition would apparently extend to anything relating to the economy, if Associated Press White House reporter and dedicated Barack Obama groupie (yes, I mean "groupie") Darlene Superville had her way. Her story's headline, as she covered President Obama's remembrance of the wonders of the "Recovery Act" — formally known as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and informally known as the "stimulus plan — directly targeted those who dare to disagree with Obama, and even attempted to concoct another phony version of "consensus" clearly intended to eventually stifle historians' dissent:

February 29, 2016, 2:07 PM EST

At the Associated Press, in a Friday morning writeup, the wire service's headline writers and reporter Martin Crutsinger demonstrated extraordinary auditory powers.

The headline writers somehow heard the entire U.S. economy start the year off "with a bang." Meanwhile, Crutsinger, continuing to earn his designated title of "worst economics writer" given by Kevin Williamson at National Review almost three years ago, picked up the sound of consumers who "roared back to life" in January. Those of us in the real world utterly failed to detect these things. What would we ever do without the extraordinary talents of the people at AP?

February 29, 2016, 12:00 AM EST

Two categories of news the press has studiously avoided during the Obama era came together this week, causing it to (in my view) proactively decide to ignore emotional congressional testimony which should have been front-page news almost everywhere.

The first is their virtually complete disinterest in reporting on congressional hearings. The list is longer than can be recounted here, but certainly includes Operation Fast & Furious, the IRS targeting scandal (now on Day 1,025) and implementation of Obamacare. The second is their reluctance to report any news casting the government's handling of legal and illegal immigration in a bad light. Leo Perrero's shocking testimony, which detailed the treatment of American IT workers at Disney who were replaced by lower-skilled foreign workers they were required to train, contained both elements. It was thus ripe to be ignored — and was.

February 28, 2016, 4:37 PM EST

The simmering feud between the Democratic Party establishment and leftists who believe that the Democratic National Committee (DNC) has acted more like "Democrats Nominating Clinton" than a genuine political party presenting viable alternatives to Hillary Clinton, visibly erupted today.

This morning, Hawaii Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard resigned her position as Vice Chair at the DNC and immediately endorsed Bernie Sanders for President. Reuters jumped on the news quickly, and has a seven-paragraph story. The New York Times has also devoted a story to the matter. By contrast, the Associated Press posted a brief blurb in a running timeline at 9:55 this morning, and has reported nothing since, effectively burying the news so deep that almost no one will see it. Perhaps AP is awaiting word from either Team Clinton or the White House as to what they're going to be allowed to report.

February 28, 2016, 10:06 AM EST

532,000 people voted in the South Carolina Democratic Party presidential primary in 2008. In this year's primary, completed yesterday, only 370,000 did. In the meantime, the state's pool of eligible voters increased by about 8 percent.

Thus, turnout in this year's Democratic primary in the Palmetto State, down by just over 30 percent in absolute terms, was down by about 35 percent on a population-adjusted basis. Beyond grudging, routine and non-specific recognitions of the decline, that's barely news. Moreover, the fact that this result occurred in a state no Democratic Party candidate has won in 40 years and in a region Republicans have mostly swept during that time certainly can't be allowed to distract from Hillary Clinton's "sweeping victory."

February 27, 2016, 11:29 PM EST

In August 2008, presidential candidate Barack Obama pledged, as paraphrased in a New York Times story, "not to use signing statements to undermine legislation passed by Congress," and "called Mr. Bush’s frequent use of such statements an abuse of his power."

On Wednesday, Obama issued another signing statement — there have now been over 30 during his presidential tenure — to put a thumb in Israel's eye, and to give aid and comfort to the misguided international anti-Israel BDS (boycott, divestment, sanctions) movement. The establishment press is minimizing its exposure of Obama's move, and, as usual, utterly failing to note Obama's about-face on signing statements since he took office.

February 27, 2016, 10:41 AM EST

Conservative and center-right columnists often have to do far more digging than their liberal counterparts, simply because overwhelmingly left-leaning beat journalists, aka "Democrats with bylines," provide such unbalanced reporting on current events on a daily basis.

Fortunately, the Washington Post's Marc Thiessen did the necessary work by rummaging through available information about federal court nominations in 1988 and 1992. Any beat reporter could have done the same thing, but either didn't, or decided not to report what was found. What Thiessen unearthed makes an argument-ending mockery of Vice President Joe Biden's claim, made in a Monday tweet, that when he was then Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, he "urged the Senate and White House to work together":

February 26, 2016, 11:51 PM EST

Hillary Clinton, the current frontrunner for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination, seems to have forgotten something that was almost definitely taught in schools around the country 50 years ago — even though it appears that it has all too often been abandoned in our current Common Core-infected system.

In a softball interview with Steve Harvey on Wednesday, Mrs. Clinton, who is on record saying that Australia's gun confiscation regime "is worth looking at," discussed what she sees as the basis for additional gun laws in this country's founding documents. If a Republican or conservative made a fourth-grade mistake such as the one readers are about to see, the Big Three networks would have headlined it on their nationwide news broadcasts for the next several days.

February 25, 2016, 11:38 AM EST

The political career of California State Senator Leland Yee, a Democrat who had been running for Secretary of State, came to an abrupt end in March 2014 when the strident gun-control advocate was arrested and charged with "six counts of depriving the public of honest services and one count of conspiracy to traffic in guns without a license."

Last week, Yee, who pled guilty last year to "one count of conspiracy to engage in racketeering," begged for a relatively lenient sentence of five years and three months. Yesterday, he got sentenced to five years. Separate Associated Press stories in these two instances each failed to identify Yee as a Democrat.

February 24, 2016, 9:55 PM EST

In the context of his pathetic writeup on the government's disappointing report on January new-home sales, Josh Boak at the Associated Press had the nerve to claim that "demand for housing has recovered over the course of the 6 ½-year recovery from the recession."

Wow. Who knew that the industry has made it all the way back to an acceptable level at long last? The obvious answer to that question is "nobody." Even the incomplete picture Boak drew in his dispatch contradicted his ridiculous claim.

February 24, 2016, 6:37 PM EST

Hillary Clinton is still sticking to her "I'll show you mine if you show me yours" strategy as the reason she won't release transcripts of her paid speeches to big banks and Wall Street firms.

She can do this because outfits like the Associated Press are covering for her. The only recognition of Mrs. Clinton's problem, beyond a strategically segregated story (more on that later), is buried deep in unbylined timeline coverage of the presidential campaign. In an entry which goes way back to 9:10 p.m. last night buried deep in the timeline, the AP tells us that "Clinton is also reiterating her pledge to release transcripts of paid speeches to Wall Street banks only if every other presidential candidate does the same." What no one seems to have noticed is that in responding to her "challenge," declared socialist Bernie Sanders, her lone Democratic Party opponent, explained why it is so phony — not just for him, but for the other remaining serious candidates of both parties.