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NewsBusters Archive

NB Staff | August 23, 2014 | 23:32

MRC president Brent Bozell repeated his criticism of the media's rush to judgment in Ferguson on Fox's The Kelly File on Friday night. (His column appeared in Investor's Business Daily on Friday as well.)

Bozell has been out front urging the media to show restraint and dwell on the facts instead of getting emotional and deciding what the facts are going to be. He called the coverage so far a "travesty" in its lurch to leftist assumptions (Video, transcript below):

Tim Graham | August 23, 2014 | 22:31

When conservative Sen. Jesse Helms died in 2008, Brent Bozell wrote about how NBC substitute anchor Lester Holt could only talk about what he opposed: "He staked out firm positions against everything from communism and foreign aid to civil rights and modern art." NBC reporter Martin Savidge called Helms an "ultra-rightist."

But when Sen. Jim Jeffords died – a man best known for leaving the GOP and throwing the Senate majority to the Democrats in the summer of 2001 – NBC anchor Brian Willliams described him on Monday as a “giant of Vermont and national politics for decades.” He was a “moderate,” not a liberal:

P.J. Gladnick | August 23, 2014 | 19:11

Just how far kooky left does a Democrat candidate have to go before ABC News will cease hyping him or her? Apparently so far left that we can't even imagine.

Writing articles for a far left socialist website or posting a profile photo of a former chairwoman of the Communist Party USA on your Facebook page is still not kooky enough to deter Benjamin Siegel of ABC News from writing an adulatory article about just such a person, the Montana Moonbat herself, Democrat Senate candidate Amanda Curtis. Here is Siegel gushing over her in a way that you just know he would never do for a Tea Party candidate:

Connor Williams | August 23, 2014 | 17:00

Is the beheading of an American journalist – along with the genocide of Christians and other religious minorities – enough to label the Islamist terror group ISIS as the consummation of evil? According to CNN.com, the answer is really quite complicated.

In fact, James Dawes, director of the program in Human Rights at Macalester College, argued in a piece for CNN’s online arm that “there are few things more dangerous now than allowing ourselves to think” that ISIS does “evil things for evil ends,”as NRO’s Jonah Goldberg phrased it in a tweet earlier this week. Dawes’s assertion is that Americans need to “do the hard work of understanding the context that made them, so that we can create a context that unmakes them.” He added that“understanding” will “help us see the world through their eyes.” [See Goldberg's tweet and excerpts from the piece after the jump.]

Brent Baker | August 23, 2014 | 15:44

“What really gets” actress Chloe Grace Moretz “going” is Hillary Clinton, a USA Today reporter discovered in meeting her for a profile piece on the 17-year-old star of If I Stay, the movie which opened yesterday (Friday) that’s based on the young adult novel by Gayle Forman.

“‘I cried when I met her,’ says Moretz, who calls Clinton an ‘icon.’”

P.J. Gladnick | August 23, 2014 | 14:57

The science is settled. General Electric Vox is now widely recognized as a tedious Web laughingstock.

I could Voxsplain it to you with a whole bunch of annoying and condescending Voxcards but others have already done so including James Taranto last month in the American Spectator. However, while his criticism and that of others might be Voxsplained away by founder Ezra Klein as just having a political axe to grind, now even the liberal Politico has written Vox off as mostly hype and little substance as you can see in the article by Dylan Byers:

Tom Johnson | August 23, 2014 | 14:25

Last Saturday, we noted that three well-known liberal bloggers had written that criticism about presidential vacations is silly and dopey. Vox’s Ezra Klein not only agrees with his brethren, but further contended in a Friday post that when a POTUS goes on vacation, he should get some real R&R, to the point that the vice president would “take over for a week or two,” with the president “get[ting] a call if something really goes wrong.”

Klein mused that “it's probably good for vice presidents to get a few weeks in the Oval Office now and again — that way, if they do have to step up to the presidency, they have a bit of experience. If Acting President Joe Biden had delivered the US's response to ISIS while Obama vacationed with his family, that would have been better for everyone involved.”

Jeffrey Lord | August 23, 2014 | 13:10

The headline couldn’t be missed.

The Huffington Post could not be any plainer if Arianna Huffington herself were walking down the main street of Ferguson at the head of a screaming mob swinging a noose. The liberal online web site wanted Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson arrested - pronto - and damn any investigation into the facts of the case - aka the truth - surrounding the shooting of Michael Brown.

Tom Blumer | August 23, 2014 | 10:38

The Associated Press's Top Business News page lists the headlines and opening passages of what the wire service believes are the ten most important business stories at the moment. Its 9:16 a.m. version had a story entitled "JACKSON HOLE DEMONSTRATORS RALLY AGAINST RATE HIKE" listed fifth. Earlier in the morning it was fourth.

Surely, I thought to myself, this must be about a group of at least several hundred to merit this level of attention. Not at all. The opening sentence at Matthew Brown's Friday afternoon story tells us it was "a group of about 10," but that one group member somehow got to speak with Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen (bolds are mine):

Mark Finkelstein | August 23, 2014 | 09:55

Dial MSNBC for Murder . . . The Lean Forward network is the place to go if that's the way you want to hear the death of Michael Brown described.  On August 12th, NB'S Ken Shepherd noted that Chris Hayes didn't utter a peep of protest when a Missouri state senator called Brown's death an "execution-style" killing.  Three days later on MSNBC, Luke Russert called Brown's death "murder" before catching himself.  

It's happened again.  On today's Up With Steve Kornacki, guest L. Joy Williams pointedly called the Brown death "murder."  Did Kornacki challenge his guest's assertion in any way? Of course not.  At the end of her statement, Kornacki blandly posed a question to Williams about poll results.  Courageous journalism, Steve!  View the video after the jump.

Brent Bozell and Tim Graham | August 23, 2014 | 08:05

The amount of mockery presidents endure usually corresponds with their polling. It applies to Republicans (Nixon, Bush, Bush), but sometimes also to Democrats (Carter). 

In 2012, the Center for Media and Public Affairs found network late-night shows told twice as many jokes about Mitt Romney as they told about President Obama. Was it because Obama was more popular than Romney? Or did it make Obama more popular than his opponent? 

Tom Johnson | August 23, 2014 | 07:10

The ESPN-affiliated, Bill Simmons-run website Grantland, which specializes in sports and popular culture, claimed on Friday that Fox News Channel is a major source of what Simmons calls “unintentional comedy” (or maybe "subconscious comedy" would be more accurate).

In a feature about the history and influence of Saturday Night Live’s “Weekend Update” segment, Grantland staff writer Brian Phillips opined that “the structure of Fox News is so deeply and basically comic that it’s impossible not to read it into the tradition of news satire” and that “like ‘Weekend Update,’ Fox succeeded by taking the elements of a normal news broadcast and exaggerating them to ludicrous proportions.”

Tom Blumer | August 22, 2014 | 20:53

Don Lemon at CNN isn't interested in being told what an "automatic" rifle is. He's decided what it is, and the truth doesn't matter. Even after recognizing after the fact that the person correcting him was right, he has no remorse for his demonstrated ignorance.

On Wednesday, as Charles C. W. Cooke noted at National Review's The Corner blog the next day, Lemon claimed that “most people can go out and buy an automatic weapon,” because he was able to do so "within 20 minutes" in Colorado two years ago. Radio host, CNN political commentator, and author Ben Ferguson corrected him. It didn't matter, because as Lemon lamely explained, "For me, an automatic weapon is anything that ... can shoot off a number of rounds very quickly." Video is after the jump, followed by Lemon's vain attempt to recover the next day.

Jack Coleman | August 22, 2014 | 20:11

Look no further for an example of why police in Ferguson, Mo., don't trust the media.

USA Today reporter Yamiche Alcindor appeared on MSNBC shortly before midnight on Aug. 18 for an interview with Rachel Maddow on the chaotic situation in Ferguson since the shooting death of an unarmed 18-year-old black man by a white police officer two weeks ago. (Video after the jump)

Cheri Jacobus | August 22, 2014 | 18:24

When the Left can't defend their plagiarists, they attack -- the original author?  Reagan biographer Craig Shirley's work has been lifted almost word for word by liberal historian Rick Perlstein in his book, Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan in no fewer than an astonishing allegation of 19 instances of plagiarism and as many as 50 instances of using his work without referencing him.  Shirley is the author of the 2004 book Reagan's Revolution.
 
The New York Times
published an article on the fact that Mr. Shirley had made the accusations, and aired his evidence. Then their "public editor" Margaret Sullivan publicly claimed  the paper was in error for -- get this -- even airing Craig Shirley's "accusations."  Jeffrey Lord reported on this here as well.

Ken Shepherd | August 22, 2014 | 16:45

In the center of CNN.com's front page right now is a headline demanding, "Where's Officer Wilson?" "As Ferguson calmed after nights of protests over the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teen, the question remains: Where's the police officer who pulled the trigger?" a caption below a file photo of Wilson added.

Yes, now that things have calmed down and returned to normal, what's the harm in stoking outrage about a "missing" police officer who hasn't been charged with a crime. Here's how CNN.com's Fatih Karimi and Michael Pearson opened their August 22 story:

Kyle Drennen | August 22, 2014 | 16:28

Filling in for Andrea Mitchell during MSNBC's 12 p.m. ET hour on Friday, Hardball host Chris Matthews hit President Obama from the left while praising Attorney General Eric Holder's visit to Ferguson, Missouri: "...it may be a lesson for the President, too, and I'm not usually a critic of him. But I have to say that I thought that in a very positive way Eric holder showed how you lead in this country. And a big part of leading is showing up." [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

The comment was prompted by correspondent Craig Melvin reporting from the community: "Attorney General Eric Holder being here earlier this week...that was a big deal for a lot of people because a lot of people on the ground here do not have a great deal of faith in the local jurisdiction but they do have a fair amount of faith in the administration."

Geoffrey Dickens | August 22, 2014 | 14:38

Liberals from David Axelrod to Alan Dershowitz have decried the grand jury indictment of Rick Perry as a hatchet job, but to NBC senior political news editor Mark Murray it’s still a political “error” for the Republican Governor of Texas.  

Appearing on Friday’s edition of MSNBC’s The Daily Rundown, Murray admitted that the indictment had “rallied a lot of conservatives” but in the end he determined it was a political loser for Perry. Murray charged: “The problem it creates is, that it just creates an error for a guy who had no margin for error.” (video after the jump)

Tim Graham | August 22, 2014 | 14:22

The Washington Post editorial board (the group that writes every day’s unsigned editorials) announced with fanfare that they would no longer use the word “Redskins” as they continue to agitate for a change in the team name. So “while we wait for the National Football League to catch up with thoughtful opinion and common decency, we have decided that, except when it is essential for clarity or effect, we will no longer use the slur ourselves.”

“What we are discussing here is a change only for editorials. Unlike our colleagues who cover sports and other news, we on the editorial board have the luxury of writing about the world as we would like it to be,” they wrote in their best Robert F. Kennedy impression.

Tom Blumer | August 22, 2014 | 13:39

The press never let George W. Bush forget about that "Mission Accomplished" banner on the USS Abraham Lincoln after Saddam Hussein was overthrown and his government's military was routed in Iraq. They often pretend that Bush said it, or adopted it. He did no such thing, saying only that “Our mission continues.”

So while the press has come close to making a claim Bush 43 never made an article of faith, it is virtually ignoring something current U.S. President Barack Obama actually said, namely that, concerning ISIS, "The analogy we use around here sometimes, and I think is accurate, is if a jayvee team puts on Lakers uniforms that doesn’t make them Kobe Bryant." Kristina Wong at the Hill is a rare exception. She reminded readers of what Obama said in January as she reported Thursday on how the nation's defense secretary and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff completely disagree (bolds are mine):